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市場調查報告書

高度汽車安全技術分析:駕駛的注意力散慢防止,ADAS(先進駕駛輔助系統),HMI(人機介面)

Advanced Auto Safety Report 2014 - Driver Distraction, ADAS & HMI

出版商 TU Automotive 商品編碼 310593
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 104 Pages; 57 Figures & Graphs; 13 Tables
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高度汽車安全技術分析:駕駛的注意力散慢防止,ADAS(先進駕駛輔助系統),HMI(人機介面) Advanced Auto Safety Report 2014 - Driver Distraction, ADAS & HMI
出版日期: 2014年09月30日 內容資訊: 英文 104 Pages; 57 Figures & Graphs; 13 Tables
簡介

安全性對汽車廠商而言經常是最優先考慮事項。而近年來更是朝獨特的安全性機能開發前進。由於第一、二代之技術已搭載在各種汽車上,目前各家廠商都在研發第三代技術。

本報告提供全球汽車產業的安全駕駛技術開發情形相關分析,基於對各家汽車廠商之經營者、技術人士所做的訪談,專就防止駕駛分散注意力之技術、ADAS(先進駕駛輔助系統),自動駕駛技術,及其技術管理、操作用HMI(人機介面)至今的開發狀況及今後的開發、市場化的預測等相關資訊,為您概述為以下內容。

第1章 駕駛的注意力散慢相關理解

  • 「駕駛的注意力散慢」是什麼?
    • 司機的「疏忽大意」和「注意事項」
  • 駕駛注意力散慢的原因
  • 闡明駕駛注意力散慢的結構
    • 司機能力相關實驗的研究
    • 自然駕駛方法相關研究
    • 衝撞(交通)事故為基礎的研究
    • 觀察為基礎的研究
  • 一次的·二次的事務相關重新評估
    • 認知力的散漫化和視覺·行動的散漫化:哪邊更危險
    • 語音控制並非萬能
    • 人·技術注意事項的影響
  • 駕駛的注意力散慢相關研究:資訊來源

第2章 與指南法規

  • 關係組織與法規當局
    • 歐洲委員會
    • NHTSA(高速公路交通安全產業團)
    • AAM(汽車製造商聯合)
    • ISO(國際標準化組織)
    • SAE(汽車技術人員協會)
    • JAMA(日本汽車工業會)
    • ITU(國際電信聯盟)
    • ITS相關歐洲·美國·日本的合作關係
  • 防止駕駛分散注意力·誘導相關里程碑(過去·未來)
  • 今後的介面·技術相關法規的發展

第3章 民生用家電·行動通訊設備的趨勢

  • 內容和連接型(連網型)服務:數量
  • IoT(物聯網)
  • 穿戴式技術
    • 數位醫療技術
  • 為求物體感應,安裝各處的相機

第4章 介面和互動

  • 語音·自然的嗓音·發音
    • 語音控制
    • 語音辨識
  • 抬頭顯示器內的AR(擴增實境)
  • 大型觸控螢幕
  • 手勢的互動
  • 具有觸覺性回饋的觸控·互動

第5章 駕駛的注意力散慢緩和策略,及為未來汽車所設的富有魅力的HMI設計

  • HMI的設計策略
    • 簡單化
    • 個人化
      • 跟行動通訊設備的一體化
        • Apple
        • Google
        • MirrorLink
      • 摘要
    • 多模式·互動
    • 優先顯示司機視線前方的資訊
    • 情境察覺適應性的HMI
      • 心理負擔
      • 司機的監測
    • 設計·實行的品質
      • 前面設計
  • 流程的改善
    • 無法等到正式指南和法規所公佈
    • 改善跟合作夥伴的合作關係

第6章 ADAS和未來的自動駕駛

  • 自動駕駛發展藍圖
    • 法律規章
  • 情境察覺與控制回復
  • 認識ADAS的警告的相關課題

產業方面的教訓

簡稱集

圖表一覽

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目錄

Safety has always been at the top of the agenda in the mind of automakers, and recently it has been propelled to new heights with the development of safety specific functions. There are already vehicles on the road with L1 and L2 capabilities - with L3 being the next step for the automakers. It's the perfect time to conduct in-depth research, to ensure strategies are in line with industry trends and developments.

This report takes a step by step approach, taking the reader through all aspects that require consideration when devising safety solutions. These range from driver distraction, through to ADAS and autonomous features.

The report draws on in-depth interviews with more than 30 industry specialists, and an exclusive Telematics Update survey of international market sentiments drawing on the answers of 352 executives. Telematics Update then turned these insights into an impartial assessment of the market.

Key Takeaways

  • Driver distraction :Understand what driver distraction is and what its many causes and effects are. Get a solid overview of the most important driver distraction studies to date. Rethink your views on the safety of voice-based interfaces and the relative dangers of cognitive driver distraction
  • Guidelines and regulations : Get to know the most important regulatory bodies and professional organizations in the area of driver distraction and HMI design. Learn about their latest regulatory efforts and understand how to keep up with their ever-evolving and, at times, conflicting demands
  • Consumer electronics and mobile trends : Consider the many consumer electronics trends pushing their way into modern cars and the various HMI design/driver distraction challenges they engender
  • Interfaces and interactions : Learn about the latest advances in interface technologies - from natural voice processing and large touchscreens to gesture controls and augmented reality - and what advantages they offer modern HMIs for safe and exciting use
  • Strategies for mitigating driver distraction through HMI design : Understand how to combine various interfaces and interactions into overall strategies for managing driver distraction. Review product simplification and personalization plus multimodal interfaces and context-aware HMIs
  • Driver distraction and automated driving : Realize that until self-driving cars are commercially available, distraction will continue to be a significant concern. Understand the situations where a driver's attention will still be required, from ADAS warnings to retaking control of the vehicle

Companies Who Contributed

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Previous Buyers

Companies that have bought previous editions of this report include:

  • Daimler
  • Homda
  • Hyundai Mobis
  • Toyota Motor Europe
  • LG Electronics
  • Fujitsu Ten

Table of Contents

Welcome

Industry reviews

Thought leadership

About Telematics Update

Thought Leadership

Acknowledgments

List of figures

List of tables

Introduction

Executive summary

Chapter 1: Understanding driver distraction

  • Figure 1: Percentage of driver
  • 1.1 What is driver distraction 2
    • 1.1.1 Driver inattention vs. driver distraction
  • 1.2 Sources of driver distraction
  • 1.3 Building a picture of driver distraction
    • 1.3.1 Experimental studies of driving performance
    • 1.3.2 Naturalistic driving studies
    • 1.3.3 Crash-based studies
    • 1.3.4 Observation-based studies
  • 1.4 Rethinking primary vs. secondary tasks
    • 1.4.1 Cognitive distraction vs. visual-manual distraction: Which is more dangerous
    • 1.4.2 Voice control is not the panacea31
    • 1.4.3 People and technology influence distracted driving
  • 1.5 Resources for driver distraction research

Chapter 2: Guidelines and regulation

  • Figure 1: Percentage of driver
  • 2.1 Organizations and regulators
    • 2.1.1 European Commission
    • 2.1.2 National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)
    • 2.1.3 Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers (AAM)
    • 2.1.4 International Organization for Standardization (ISO)
    • 2.1.5 Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)4
    • 2.1.6 Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA)
    • 2.1.7 International Telecommunication Union (ITU)
    • 2.1.8 EU-US-Japan cooperation in ITS
  • 2.2 Milestones in driver distraction regulation and guidance (past and future)
  • 2.3 Regulatory developments for future interfaces and technology

Chapter 3: Consumer electronics and mobile trends

  • Figure 1: Percentage of driver
  • 3.1 Content and connected services: Strength in numbers
  • 3.2 The Internet of Things
  • 3.3 Wearable technology
    • 3.3.1 Digital healthcare
  • 3.4 Cameras everywhere with object recognition

Chapter 4: Interfaces and interaction

  • Figure 1: Percentage of driver
  • 4.1 Sound, voice and speech
    • 4.1.1 Voice control
    • 4.1.2 Sound perception
  • 4.2 Augmented reality in Head-Up Displays
  • 4.3 Large touchscreens
  • 4.4 Gestural interaction
  • 4.5 Touch interaction with haptic feedback

Chapter 5: Strategies for mitigating driver distraction anddesigning winning HMI in the vehicles of tomorrow

  • Figure 1: Percentage of driver
  • 5.1 HMI design strategies7
    • 5.1.1 Simplification
    • 5.1.2 Personalization
      • 5.1.2.1 Integration of mobile devices
        • 5.1.2.1.1 Apple
        • 5.1.2.1.2 Google
        • 5.1.2.1.3 MirrorLink
      • 5.1.2.2 Summary
    • 5.1.3 Multimodal interaction
    • 5.1.4 Prioritize information in the driver's line of sight
    • 5.1.5 Context aware and adaptive HMI
      • 5.1.5.1 Mental workload
      • 5.1.5.2 Driver monitoring
    • 5.1.6 Quality of design implementation
      • 5.1.6.1 Font design
  • 5.2 Process improvements
    • 5.2.1 Don't wait for official distraction guidelines and regulations before acting
    • 5.2.2 Improve collaborative partnerships

Chapter 6: ADAS and the future of automated driving

  • Figure 1: Percentage of driver
  • 6.1 Automated technology roadmap9
    • 6.1.1 Legislation
  • 6.2 Situation awareness and taking back control
  • 6.3 The challenge of making ADAS warnings noticed

Industry learnings

List of acronyms

List of figures

  • Figure 1: Percentage of drivers involved in fatal crashes for different age groups in 2012
  • Figure 2: Broad views on driver distraction vs. driver inattention (mean values)
  • Figure 3: Graphical representation of driver inattention showing driver distraction as a specific type of inattention
  • Figure 4: Methods of assessing driving performance and driver demand
  • Figure 5: Cell phone distraction goes underreported in crash-based studies
  • Figure 6: Activities are placed on the continuum based on how essential they are to the driving task and overall workload
  • Figure 7: Driver distraction and risk to safety
  • Figure 8: Understanding driver distraction for the purpose of HMI design
  • Figure 9: Tasks listed in ascending order for the amount of off-road glance time that occurred during the completion of each task
  • Figure 10: Milestones in driver distraction regulation and guidance (past and future)
  • Figure 11: Consumer purchase priorities
  • Figure 12: Consumer interest in ADAS compared with connected services
  • Figure 13: Forecast of connectivity penetration in Western Europe
  • Figure 14: The IoT will connect all kinds of infrastructure, devices and Cloud services
  • Figure 15: Samsung Gear Fit
  • Figure 16: Google Glass
  • Figure 17: Nissan Nismo watch
  • Figure 18: Smart contact lens prototype for detecting glucose levels in tears
  • Figure 19: Importance of different functions for managing driver distraction
  • Figure 20: Customer satisfaction with speech recognition
  • Figure 21: A spatial auditory display aiding the driver by warning him of another vehicle approaching a blind intersection
  • Figure 22: Head-up display showing typical navigation and speed information
  • Figure 23: Theodolite AR app superimposes real time information about position, altitude, bearing, range, and inclination on the iPhone's live camera image
  • Figure 24: Honda's projected path AR concept
  • Figure 25: Continental's augmented reality HUD concept displays ADAS and navigation information
  • Figure 26: Land Rover's augmented reality Transparent Bonnet concept infographic
  • Figure 27: Land Rover's augmented reality Transparent Bonnet concept
  • Figure 28: Customer satisfaction with touch screens
  • Figure 29: BMW research investigating new interaction concepts on large screens.
  • Left: Enlarge interactive areas. Middle: Offer haptic guidance points. Right: Allow for position-independent touch gestures
  • Figure 30: The display can be split into two, or a single function like navigation can be shown full screen
  • Figure 31: Adjusting settings with small target areas can be awkward, although the on/off toggle buttons are easy to swipe
  • Figure 32: Long lists like media libraries or contacts are easier to scroll on such a tall screen
  • Figure 33: Adjusting some common climate controls like fan speed and direction required you to enter a sub menu
  • Figure 34: Touchpad in new Mercedes C-Class, with multi-touch capability and haptic feedback
  • Figure 35: Importance of specified HMI design objectives
  • Figure 36: Opel Intellilink infotainment system showing favourite contacts, radio stations, playlists and nav locations pinned to bottom row of touch screen
  • Figure 37: Top five smartphone operating systems by worldwide shipments
  • Figure 38: Apple CarPlay in 2015MY Volvo XC90
  • Figure 39: Home screen of 'Windows in the Car' smartphone mirroring concept
  • Figure 40: Visteon's multimodal Horizon Cockpit concept with gesture, voice and touch interaction
  • Figure 41: Controlling volume with 3D gesture control in Visteon's Horizon Cockpit
  • Figure 42: Mitsubishi multimodal navigation interface for Chinese-language character input
  • Figure 43: Interior of 2015MY Audi TT has fully reconfigurable instrument cluster and no center display
  • Figure 44: Aviate intelligent homescreen for Android, and EasilyDo personal assistant for iOS/Android
  • Figure 45: Mitsubishi Ultra-easy HMI prototype
  • Figure 46: Interior driver monitoring cameras can observe the position of the driver's head and the viewing angle
  • Figure 47: Audi TT virtual instrument cluster (2015MY) features a 3D model of the car with a confusing radial menu of icons
  • Figure 48: Square grotesque Eurostile font vs. humanist Frutiger font highlighting characteristics thought to improve legibility
  • Figure 49: Importance of HMI and driver distraction guidelines
  • Figure 50: Likely policies that companies will follow to minimize driver distraction
  • Figure 51: SAE J3106 Levels of driving automation
  • Figure 52: Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) data showing percentage of owners who drive with lane departure warning turned on
  • Figure 53: IIHS data showing percent change in vehicle damage claims per insured vehicle year for vehicle 5collisions
  • Figure 54: Breakdown of TU's April 2014 survey by primary business of respondent
  • Figure 55: Breakdown of TU's April 2014 survey by job function of respondent
  • Figure 56: Breakdown of TU's April 2014 survey by main target market
  • Figure 57: Breakdown of TU's April 2014 survey by geographic region

List of tables

  • Figure 1: Percentage of driver
  • Table 1: Drivers involved in fatal crashes by age in 2012
  • Table 2: Broad views on driver distraction vs. driver inattention
  • Table 3: Driver distraction and risk to safety
  • Table 4: Understanding driver distraction for the purpose of HMI design
  • Table 5: Research groups and organizations
  • Table 6: ISO standards produced by ISO/TC 22 Road vehicles /SC 13WG 8
  • Table 7: ISO standards produced by ISO/TC 204 Intelligent transport systems
  • Table 8: SAE-issued standards overseen by the Safety and Human Factors Standards Steering Committee
  • Table 9: SAE work-in-progress standards overseen by the Safety and Human Factors Standards Steering Committee
  • Table 10: Breakdown of TU's April 2014 survey by primary business of respondent
  • Table 11: Breakdown of TU's April 2014 survey by job function of respondent
  • Table 12: Breakdown of TU's April 2014 survey by main target market
  • Table 13: Breakdown of TU's April 2014 survey by geographic region
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