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西班牙裔:人口統計·個人消費趨勢

Hispanics: Demographic and Consumer Spending Trends

出版商 Packaged Facts 商品編碼 361663
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 172 Pages
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西班牙裔:人口統計·個人消費趨勢 Hispanics: Demographic and Consumer Spending Trends
出版日期: 2016年06月23日 內容資訊: 英文 172 Pages
簡介

本報告提供美國的西班牙裔人口統計及個人消費趨勢相關調查,提供您近幾年的消費趨勢市場考察,語言·文化轉換趨勢,購買力趨勢,金融服務的使用趨勢,及行銷趨勢等相關分析。

第1章 摘要整理

第2章 考察·機會

  • 主要的考察
  • 促進個人消費成長的拉丁裔
  • 拉丁裔是影響個人消費最大的地方
  • 金融服務的成長越發仰賴拉丁裔消費者
  • 拉丁裔消費者大大改變了消費的優先順序
  • 高價商品呈現盛況
  • 家庭服務造成家用產品消費價值受損
  • 拉丁裔擴大了保險目標範圍
  • 西班牙裔 vs. 非西班牙裔的消費趨勢差異
  • 市場趨勢·機會、其他

第3章 西班牙裔的人口趨勢

  • 西班牙裔人口的成長趨勢
  • 拉丁裔人口超過5,500萬
  • 拉丁裔人口的成長促進美國多文化的變化
  • 美國出生的拉丁裔推動西班牙裔人口的增加
  • 拉丁裔的出身地
  • 西班牙裔人口維持高比例
  • 西班牙裔人口在廣泛區域增加
  • 拉丁裔的出生地
  • 墨西哥人佔多數
  • 中美的人口增加最早,墨西哥人增加最多、其他

第4章 語言·文化轉換趨勢

  • 語言趨勢
  • 西班牙語的使用率逐漸下降
  • 英語劇增
  • 各出身國英語的使用率大不相同
  • 移民的減少影響西班牙語的優勢
  • 世代交替促使英語使用率增加
  • 英語 vs. 西班牙語對多數拉丁裔而言是簡單的問題
  • 文化轉換趨勢
  • 拉丁裔是有明顯文化差異的市場區隔
  • 具有多大的文化轉換的差異影響力、其他

第5章 人口統計趨勢

  • 年齡·性別
  • 西班牙裔平均年齡較年輕
  • 拉丁裔在青年市場區隔上的大勢力
  • 拉丁裔促進多文化年輕人的力量擴大
  • 青年拉丁裔在加州·德克薩斯州中已佔大多數
  • 年齡結構依出生地不同而有所不同
  • 拉丁裔人口偏男性
  • 教育·職業趨勢
  • 教育提升了許多拉丁裔
  • 性別差距越來越大、其他

第6章 購買力趨勢

  • 西班牙裔的購買力趨勢
  • 個人所得總合的成長大大超過平均
  • 西班牙裔 vs. 非西班牙裔
  • 拉丁裔佔個人所得總合的10%
  • 墨西哥人佔多數
  • 拉丁裔的購買力超過1兆3000億美元、其他

第7章 近幾年的消費趨勢

  • 概要
  • 拉丁裔的消費優先順序經歷了根本性變化
  • 主要的消費趨勢
  • 拉丁裔的汽車消費劇增
  • 西班牙裔系在家庭服務上比起產品更大量支出、其他

第8章 金融服務的利用

  • 銀行服務
  • 拉丁裔轉換到活期存款戶頭
  • 拉丁家的銀行帳戶顯示出踏實的成長
  • 信用卡·轉帳卡
  • 對現金執著度的降低、其他

第9章 西班牙裔消費者的行銷

  • 概要
  • 由於人口統計的變化行銷環境持續變化
  • 與西班牙語廣告相關的拉丁裔為數不多
  • 傳統的拉丁裔依然與西班牙語活動有關
  • 西班牙語廣告有廣泛影響的可能性、其他
目錄
Product Code: LA15032147

Marketers and retailers have long recognized the exceptional role Hispanic consumers play in their growth strategies. Sheer numbers are one reason. Over the next decade Latinos will account for more than half of the population growth in the United States. Ten years from now Hispanics will comprise one in every five Americans. By mid-century Hispanics will be on the cusp of forming a majority of the populations of California and Texas.

Yet, Hispanics embody far more than just an extraordinarily fast-growing segment of the American population. This Packaged Facts report unmasks the simple but powerful formula that lies behind the recent remarkable growth in Hispanic spending power. First, the number of Hispanic households has been growing faster than the number of non-Hispanic households. Second, average spending by Latino households has increased more than average spending by non-Hispanic households. These two basic variables (more rapid household growth + higher growth in average spending) add up to a higher rate of growth in aggregate spending by Latino households than non-Latino households in recent years.

As a result, Latino consumers have become the most important driver of growth in a wide variety of consumer expenditure categories. For example, between 2012 and 2015 increased spending by Latino households represented around 40% of the growth in aggregate spending for household equipment such as computers and telephones and 25% of the growth in aggregate consumer spending for new cars and trucks. Latino households accounted for double-digit shares of growth in aggregate expenditures for furniture (20%), major appliances (18%), audio-visual equipment and services (17%) and small appliances (16%).

The same phenomenon has occurred in the use of financial services. Over the past decade the percent of Hispanic individuals and households using a wide array of financial services has grown faster than it has among non-Hispanic consumers. As a result, Hispanic consumers have become a pillar of growth in the financial services industry. For example, between 2005 and 2015 growth in credit card use by Latinos grew 11 times faster than it did among non-Hispanics (44% vs. 4%). The 5.1 million additional Latinos with credit cards accounted for around half (49%) of the growth in the number of consumers using credit cards.

Scope of the Report

This Packaged Facts report analyzes recent consumer spending and demographic trends of the Hispanic population in the United States. The report uses the terms “Hispanic” and “Latino” interchangeably. According to survey research compiled by Washington, D.C.-based Pew Hispanic Research Center, 51% of those self-identifying as “Hispanic” or “Latino” have no preference for either term. Those expressing a preference choose Hispanic over Latino by 33% to 14%. However, neither term fully captures how Hispanics see themselves. A majority (51%) of respondents to the Pew survey said they most often use their family's country of origin to identify themselves (for example, “Mexican” or “Dominican”).

Methodology

The primary source of consumer data in this report is the Simmons National Hispanic Consumer Study (NHCS) for Fall 2015, which was fielded between November 2014 and December 2015. Simmons NHCS includes demographic and media usage questions specifically targeting Hispanic consumers. The report uses the Fall 2005 NCS for trend analysis tables. On an ongoing basis, Simmons conducts booklet-based surveys of a large and random sample of consumers (approximately 25,000 for each 12-month survey compilation) who in aggregate represent a statistically accurate cross-section of the U.S. population.

U.S. Government sources include data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The CES tracks expenditures of “consumer units,” which are equivalent to Census Bureau “households.” This Packaged Facts report uses the term “households” for the sake of consistency. The report compares consumer expenditure patterns in the most recent CES, which covers the 12-month period from mid-2014 through mid-2015, with those in the survey covering the 12-month period ending in mid-2012.

The primary Census Bureau source used in this report is the American Community Survey (ACS) because it includes detailed demographic data for major national segments within the Hispanic population. Data from ACS date back to 2005. The latest available ACS data cover 2014. Census Bureau population estimates and projections as well as data from the Current Population Survey are also used where appropriate.

The report is also based on data from a range of industry sources, including company websites, press releases, trade publications, business newspapers and magazines and consumer blogs.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Executive Summary

  • Scope of the Report
  • Methodology
  • Insights and Opportunities
  • Latino Consumers Make Major Shifts in Spending Priorities
  • Household Services Take Away from Spending on Household Products
  • Latinos Ramp Up on Insurance Coverage
  • Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Spending Trends Differ
  • Hispanic Consumer Base Will Continue Rapid Expansion
  • Latino Consumers Offer High Hopes for Financial Services Marketers
  • Hispanic Millennials Key to the Future of Financial Services Industry
  • Hispanic Population Trends
  • Latino Population Growth Drives Multicultural Shift in U.S.
  • U.S.-Born Latinos Spark Hispanic Population Growth
  • Hispanic Population Has Impact Throughout the U.S.
  • Mexicans Predominate, Central American Population Grows Fastest
  • Hispanic Immigration Slows as Outmigration Grows
  • Acculturation Will Lead to Lower Birth Rates
  • Latinos Still Set to Increase Impact on American Society
  • Latinos Will Form Majority in California and Texas by 2060
  • Language and Acculturation Trends
  • English Usage on the Upswing
  • Latinos Divide into Distinct Acculturation Segments
  • Foreign-Born Latinos Will Remain Key Segment
  • Most Hispanics Still Marry Other Hispanics
  • Demographic Trends
  • Latinos Major Force in Younger Age Segments
  • Age Structure Varies by National Origin
  • Latino Population Skewed Toward Males
  • Education Lifts Up More Latinos
  • High-Paying Jobs for Latinos on the Upswing
  • Middle-Income Households at the Heart of Hispanic Population
  • Solid Growth in Upper-Income Latino Households
  • Children Remain a Fundamental Feature of Hispanic Households
  • Larger Households More Common Among Latinos
  • Mexican Households Most Likely to Be Married-Couple Families
  • Trends in Hispanic Buying Power
  • Aggregate Personal Income Growth Far Above Average
  • Mexicans Dominate
  • Buying Power of Latinos Tops $1.3 Trillion
  • Hispanic Buying Power to Reach $1.8 Trillion in 2020
  • Latino Consumers Wield Growing Power in American Marketplace
  • Recent Trends in Hispanic Consumer Spending
  • Spending on Big-Ticket Items Up
  • Food and Apparel Spending Down
  • Household Services Winning Out Over Household Products
  • Hispanics Boost Insurance Expenditures
  • Use of Financial Services by Latinos
  • Latino Ownership of Bank Accounts Shows Robust Growth
  • Attachment to Cash Declines
  • Dramatic Increase in Hispanic Credit Card Use
  • Use of Debit Cards More than Doubles among Latinos
  • Latinos Offer Growth Opportunity for Life Insurance Industry
  • Health Insurance Coverage Rises Among Latinos
  • Latinos Account for Most of the Growth in Auto Insurance Coverage
  • Tenants Insurance for Latinos Experiences Exponential Growth
  • Marketing to Hispanic Consumers
  • Fewer Latinos Connect with Spanish-Language Advertising
  • Traditional Latinos Still Relate to Spanish-Language Advertising
  • More Hispanics Gravitate to English-Language Media
  • Millennials in Vanguard of Acculturated Latinos

Chapter 2: Insights and Opportunities

  • Topline Insights
  • Latinos Drive Growth in Consumer Spending
  • Figure 2-1: Percent Growth in Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households,2012-2015
  • Figure 2-2: Hispanic Households as Percent of Growth in Total Number of U.S. Households, 2012-2015
  • Figure 2-3: Percent Growth in Average and Aggregate Consumer Expenditures by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households, 2012-2015
  • Figure 2-4: Hispanic Households as Percent of Growth in Aggregate Consumer Expenditures, 2012-2015
  • Where Latinos Have Had the Biggest Impact on Consumer Spending
  • Figure 2-5: Growth in Aggregate Expenditures by Latino Households as Percent of Growth in Total Aggregate Expenditures: By Selected Categories, 2012-2015
  • Growth in Financial Services Increasingly Depends on LatinonConsumers
  • Figure 2-6: Change in Percent of Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Consumers Using Financial Services: By Category, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Figure 2-7: Hispanic Consumers as Percent of Total Growth in Use of Financial Services: By Category, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Latino Consumers Make Major Shifts in Spending Priorities
  • Table 2-1: Share of Total Annual Consumer Expenditures by Hispanic Households: By Expenditure Category, 2012 vs. 2015
  • Big-Ticket Items Gain Ground
  • Figure 2-8: Percent Change in Average Annual Spending by Hispanic Households, Automotive Vehicles, Household Furnishings and Equipment, Apparel and Personal Care Products and Services,2012-2015
  • Latinos Investing in Nesting
  • Figure 2-9: Percent Change in Average Annual Expenditures by Latino Households on Household Furnishings and Equipment, Fees and Admissions and Food Away From Home, 2012-2015
  • Household Services Take Away from Spending on Household Products
  • Figure 2-10: Percent Change in Average Annual Expenditures by Hispanic Households on Household Operations and Housekeeping Supplies:By Category, 2012-2015
  • Latinos Ramp Up on Insurance Coverage
  • Figure 2-11: Percent Change in Average Annual Expenditures by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households on Insurance: By Category, 2012-2015
  • Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Spending Trends Differ
  • Table 2-2: Largest Differences in Spending Changes for Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households: By Expenditure Category, 2012 vs. 2015
  • Figure 2-12: Smallest Percentage Point Differences by Expenditure Category in Spending Changes by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households, 2012 vs. 2015
  • Market Trends and Opportunities
  • Hispanic Consumer Base Will Continue Rapid Expansion
  • Figure 2-13: Hispanics and Other Population Segments as Share of Projected U.S. Population Increase, 2015-2025 (percent)
  • Marketers Will Encounter Growing Core of Higher-Income Households
  • Figure 2-14: Hispanic Households as Share of Increase in Number of Households with Income Between $75,000 and $100,000, 2005-2014(percent)
  • Traditional Latinos Will Continue to Matter to Marketers
  • Figure 2-15: Hispanics 18 Years Old and Over: Percent U.S.-Born vs. Foreign-Born, 2014
  • Figure 2-16: Percent of Hispanics Who Speak Spanish at Home and Speak English “Not Well” or “Not at All”: By Age Group, 2014 (percent)
  • Figure 2-17: Hispanic Married Couples with Children: Percent With One Spouse vs. Two Spouses of Hispanic Origin, 2015
  • Latino Consumers Offer High Hopes for Financial Services Marketers
  • Hispanic Millennials Key Part of Future for Financial Services Industry
  • Figure 2-18: 25- to 34-Year-Olds as Percent of Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Populations and Users of Financial Services, 2014
  • Hispanic Millennials Have Different Views About Financial Services
  • Cellphone Use Makes Latinos “Super Consumers”
  • Figure 2-19 Share of Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics Agreeing “I Am Likely to Purchase Products I See Advertised on My Cellphone”: By Age Group,2015 (percent)

Chapter 3: Hispanic Population Trends

  • Hispanic Population Growth Trends
  • Latino Population Tops 55 Million
  • Table 3-1: U.S. Population by Race and Hispanic Origin, 1990-2014(in thousands and percentages)
  • Figure 3-1 Hispanics as Percent of U.S. Population Growth, 1990-2014
  • Latino Population Growth Drives Multicultural Shift in U.S.
  • Figure 3-2: Multicultural vs. Non-Hispanic White Population Segments as Percent of U.S. Population, 1990 vs. 2014
  • Table 3-2: U.S. Population Growth: Multicultural vs. Non-Hispanic White Population Segments, 1990-2014 (in thousands)
  • Figure 3-3: Multicultural Population Segments as Percent of U.S. Population Growth, 1990-2014
  • U.S.-Born Latinos Spark Hispanic Population Growth
  • Figure 3-4: Percent of U.S.-Born vs. Foreign-Born Hispanics, 2005 vs. 2014
  • Table 3-3: Growth in Number of U.S.-Born vs. Foreign-Born Hispanics, 2005-2014 (in thousands)
  • Figure 3-5: U.S.-Born vs. Foreign-Born Hispanics as Percent of Total Hispanic Population Growth, 2005-2014
  • Where Latinos Live
  • Hispanic Population Remains Highly Concentrated
  • Figure 3-6: States with Largest Share of Hispanic Population, 2014
  • Table 3-4: States with Largest Hispanic Populations, 2014 (in thousands)
  • Table 3-5: Top 5 States Ranked by Size of Growth in Hispanic Population,2010-2014 (in thousands)
  • Hispanic Population Grows in Wide Range of Locales
  • Table 3-6: Selected States With High Rate of Growth in Hispanic Population,2010-2014
  • Where Latinos Come From
  • Mexicans Predominate
  • Table 3-7: Hispanic Population by Country of Origin, 2014 (in thousands)
  • Central American Population Grows Fastest, Mexican Grows the Most
  • Figure 3-7: Percent Growth in Hispanic Population by Country/Region of Origin, 2005-2014
  • Figure 3-8: Hispanic National/Regional Population Segments as Percent of Total Hispanic Population Growth, 2005-2014
  • More Diversity Outside the West and Southwest
  • Figure 3-9: States with Largest Hispanic Populations Ranked by Percent Mexican Population, 2014
  • Table 3-8: States with Largest Concentrations of National Segments of Latino Population, 2014 (in thousands)
  • National Groups Cluster in Handful of States
  • Table 3-9: National Segments of Latino Population Ranked by State, 2014(in thousands)
  • Hispanic Population Growth Projections
  • Pace of Hispanic Population Growth Expected to Slow
  • Figure 3-10: Compound Annual Growth Rate in Hispanic Population for Selected Periods, 1990-2025
  • Hispanic Immigration Slows as Outmigration Grows
  • Figure 3-11: Net International Migration of Hispanic Population, 2000-2014(in thousands)
  • Source: Compiled by Packaged Facts based on data from U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Acculturation Will Lead to Lower Birth Rates
  • Figure 3-12: Number of Births per 1,000 Hispanic Women, 2000-2014
  • Figure 3-13: Percent of 25- to 34-Year-Old Hispanic Women Who Have Never Had a Child, 2000 vs. 2014
  • Latinos Still Set to Increase Their Impact on American Society
  • Table 3-10: U.S. Population Projections by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2015,2020, and 2025 (in thousands)
  • Table 3-11: Projected Share of Growth in U.S. Population by Race and Hispanic Origin, 2015-2025 (in thousands)
  • Latinos Will Form Majority in California and Texas by 2060
  • Figure 3-14: Hispanics as Percent of Projected Population of State of Texas,2020-2050
  • Figure 3-15: Hispanics as Percent of Projected Population of State of California, 2020-2060

Chapter 4: Language and Acculturation Trends

  • Language Trends
  • Spanish Usage Slowly Declining
  • Figure 4-1: Spanish-Language Use at Home by Hispanics Five Years Old and Over, 2005 vs. 2014 (in thousands)
  • Figure 4-2: Spanish-Language Use at Home by Hispanics Five Years Old and Over, 2005 vs. 2014 (percent of total)
  • English on the Upswing
  • Figure 4-3: English-Language Use at Home by Hispanics Five Years Old and Over, 2005 vs. 2014 (percent of total)
  • Figure 4-4: English-Language Use at Home by Hispanics Five Years Old and Over, 2005 vs. 2014 (in thousands)
  • Figure 4-5: Percent Change in English-Language and Spanish-Language Use at Home by Hispanics Five Years Old and Over, 2005-2014
  • Wide Differences in English-Language Use Across National Origins
  • Figure 4-6: Percent Speaking English at Home by National Origin, 2014
  • Slowing Immigration Will Affect Dominance of Spanish Language
  • Figure 4-7: Language Spoken at Home: U.S.-Born vs. Foreign-Born Latinos,2015
  • Generational Change Leads to Rise in English-Language Use
  • Table 4-1: English Language Use by U.S.-Born Mexicans by Age Group and Place of Birth of Parents, 2015
  • English vs. Spanish Not a Simple Issue for Many Latinos
  • Table 4-2: Languages Spoken in Home of Latinos vs. Languages Prefer to Speak, 2015
  • Acculturation Trends
  • Latinos Divide into Distinct Acculturation Segments
  • Table 4-3: Degree of Acculturation of Latinos by Place of Nativity and Languages Spoken in Home, 2015 (in thousands)
  • Table 4-4: Hispanic Degree of Identification with Original and Host Cultures by Place of Birth and Language Usage, 2015
  • Differences in Acculturation Have Many Implications
  • Table 4-5: Attitudes of U.S-Born and Foreign-Born Hispanics Toward Maintaining Hispanic Culture: By Acculturation Segment, 2015
  • Demographic Profiles Vary Across Acculturation Spectrum
  • Table 4-6: Demographic Profile of Hispanics by Degree of Identification with Original and Host Cultures and by Place of Birth and Language Usage,2015
  • National Segments Vary in Extent of Acculturation
  • Table 4-7: Degree of Identification with Original and Host Cultures by National Origin, 2015
  • Looking to the Future of Hispanic Culture in America
  • Foreign-Born Latinos Will Remain Key Segment
  • Figure 4-8: Percent of U.S.- and Foreign-Born Latinos, 2015-2060
  • Table 4-8: Hispanic Population Projections by Place of Birth, 2015-2025(in thousands)
  • Most Hispanics Still Marry Other Hispanics
  • Figure 4-9: Percent of Married Couples of Hispanic Origin with Children with Two Hispanic Spouses, 2000 vs. 2015
  • Table 4-9: Growth in Number of Married Couples and Opposite-Sex Unmarried Couples by Presence of Children and by Hispanic Origin of Both Spouses/Partners, 2000-2015
  • Most Latinos Agree “You Don't Have to Speak Spanish to Be Latino”

Chapter 5: Demographic Trends

  • Age and Gender
  • Hispanics Younger than Average
  • Figure 5-1: Median Age of Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic White Populations, 2014
  • Latinos Major Force in Younger Age Segments
  • Figure 5-2: Percent of Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Populations Over 40 vs. Under 40 Years of Age, 2014
  • Figure 5-3: Hispanics as Percent of Selected Age Groups, 2014
  • Latinos Drive Growing Power of Multicultural Youth
  • Figure 5-4: Non-Hispanic White vs. Multicultural Population Segments as Percent of U.S. Population, 2014
  • Youngest Latinos Already in Majority in California and Texas
  • Table 5-1: Hispanics as Percent of Population Under 18 Years of Age in California and Texas: By Age Group, 2014
  • Age Structure Varies by National Origin
  • Figure 5-5: Median Age of Hispanic Population by National Origin, 2014
  • Latino Population Skewed Toward Males
  • Table 5-2: Percent of Males by Age Group: Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Population, 2014
  • Education and Occupational Trends
  • Education Lifts Up More Latinos
  • Figure 5-6: Educational Attainment of Hispanics 25 and Over, 2005 vs. 2014
  • Figure 5-7: Educational Attainment of Hispanics vs. All Adults 25 and Over,2014
  • Gender Gap Widens
  • Figure 5-8: Percent of Hispanic Men and Women Age 25 and Over with Associate's Degree or Higher, 2005 vs. 2014
  • High-Paying Jobs for Latinos on the Upswing
  • Figure 5-9: Occupational Categories for Hispanics vs. All Adults, 2014
  • Figure 5-10: Percent of Hispanics in Management, Professional, Service and Sales and Office Occupations, 2005 vs. 2014
  • Education and Occupations Vary Across National Groups
  • Figure 5-11: Percent of Hispanics with Bachelor's Degree or More:By National Origin, 2014
  • Figure 5-12: Percent of Hispanics Employed in Management, Science, Business and Arts Occupations: By National Origin, 2014
  • Household Income
  • Middle-Income Households at the Heart of Hispanic Population
  • Figure 5-13: Household Income Brackets for Hispanic vs. All Households,2014 (percent)
  • Solid Growth in Middle- and Upper-Income Latino Households
  • Table 5-3: Increase in Number of Households with Income of $75,000 or More: Hispanic vs. All Households, 2005 vs. 2014 (in thousands)
  • Figure 5-14: Number of Hispanic Households with Income of $100,000 or More, 2005 vs. 2014 (in thousands)
  • Cubans and South Americans Most Affluent Latino Segments
  • Figure 5-15: Per Capita Income of Hispanics by National Origin, 2014
  • Household and Family Structure
  • Children Remain a Fundamental Feature of Hispanic Households
  • Figure 5-16: Type of Household: Hispanic vs. All Households, 2015
  • Most Hispanic Kids Live with Two Parents
  • Table 5-4: Living Arrangements of Children under 18: Hispanic vs. All Children, 2015
  • Larger Households More Common Among Latinos
  • Figure 5-17: Average Household Size: Hispanic vs. All Households, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Figure 5-18: Average Hispanic Household Size by National Origin, 2014
  • Mexican Households Most Likely to Be Married-Couple Families
  • Figure 5-19: Hispanic Married-Couple Households by National Origin, 2014
  • Figure 5-20: Share of Hispanic Households with Children: By National Origin,2014 (percent)

Chapter 6: Buying Power Trends

  • Hispanic Buying Power Trends
  • Aggregate Personal Income Growth Far Above Average
  • Figure 6-1: Percent Increase in Aggregate Personal Income:
  • Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 2005-2014
  • Latinos Account for 10% of Aggregate Personal Income
  • Figure 6-2: Percent of Aggregate Personal Income:Hispanic vs. Other Population Segments, 2014
  • Mexicans Dominate
  • Buying Power of Latinos Tops $1.3 Trillion
  • Table 6-3: Buying Power of Hispanic Consumers, 2010-2015 (in billion $)
  • Projected Growth in Hispanic Buying Power
  • Factors Affecting Growth in Hispanic Buying Power
  • Figure 6-3: Average Annual Consumer Expenditures of Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households as Percent of Before-Tax Income, 2015
  • Figure 6-4: Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics as Percent of Total U.S. Population Growth, 2015-2020
  • Figure 6-5: Number of Latino Households with Income of $100,000 or More,2005 vs. 2014 (in thousands)
  • Figure 6-6: Measures of Consumer Confidence: Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics,2015
  • Hispanic Buying Power to Reach $1.8 Trillion in 2020
  • Table 6-5: Projected Growth in Buying Power of Hispanic Consumers,2015-2020 (in millions of dollars)

Chapter 7: Recent Spending Trends

  • Overview
  • Latino Spending Priorities Undergo Radical Shift
  • Figure 7-1: Percent Change in Average Annual Spending by Hispanic Households: By Selected Expenditure Categories, 2012-2015
  • Table 7-1: Key Changes in Spending Patterns of Hispanic Households:By Expenditure Category, 2012 vs. 2015
  • Top Spending Trends
  • Latino Spending on Automotive Vehicles Surges
  • Table 7-2: Aggregate Spending on Automotive Vehicles by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households, 2012-2015 (in millions of dollars)
  • Figure 7-2: Hispanic Households as Percent of Total Aggregate Spending on Automotive Vehicles, 2012 vs. 2015
  • Figure 7-3: Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics as Percent of Increase in Aggregate Spending on New Cars and Trucks, 2012-2015
  • Table 7-3: Aggregate Spending on New Cars and Trucks by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households, 2012-2015 (in millions of dollars)
  • Figure 7-4: Spending on New Cars and Trucks as Percent of Total Spending on Automotive Vehicles by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households, 2012 vs. 2015
  • Figure 7-5: Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics as Percent of Increase in Aggregate Spending on New Cars and Trucks, 2012-2015
  • Figure 7-6: Spending by Hispanic Households as Percent of Total Aggregate Spending on New Cars and Trucks, 2012 vs. 2015
  • Table 7-4: Aggregate Spending on Used Cars and Trucks by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households, 2012-2015 (in millions of dollars)
  • Hispanics Now Spend More on Household Services, Less on Products
  • Figure 7-7 Aggregate Spending by Hispanic Households on Household Operations (Services), 2012 vs. 2015 (in millions of dollars)
  • Figure 7-8 Spending by Hispanic Households as Percent of Total Aggregate Spending on Household Operations (Services), 2012 vs. 2015
  • Table 7-5: Aggregate Spending on Housekeeping Supplies by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households, 2012 vs. 2015 (in millions of dollars)
  • Figure 7-9 Spending by Hispanic Households as Percent of Total Aggregate Spending on Housekeeping Supplies, 2012 vs. 2015
  • Latinos Becoming Prime Customers for Insurance Industry
  • Table 7-6: Aggregate Spending on Health, Auto and Life and Other Personal Insurance by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households, 2012-2015(in millions of dollars)
  • Figure 7-10 Spending by Hispanic Households as Percent of Total Aggregate Spending on Health Insurance, Life & Other Personal Insurance, and Vehicle Insurance, 2012 vs. 2015
  • Figure 7-11 Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics as Percent of Increase in Aggregate Spending on Vehicle Insurance, 2012-2015
  • Big Boost in Latino Spending on Furniture and Appliances
  • Table 7-7: Aggregate Spending by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households on Household Furnishings and Equipment, 2012-2015 (in millions of dollars)
  • Table 7-8: Expenditures on Household Furnishings and Bedding, Bath & Linens by Hispanic Households in Last 12 Months, 2012 vs. 2015(in thousands of households)
  • Table 7-9: Aggregate Spending by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households on
  • Household Furnishings and Equipment by Category, 2012-2015(in millions of dollars)
  • Figure 7-12 Spending by Hispanic Households as Percent of Total Aggregate
  • Spending on Household Furnishings and Equipment by Category,2012-2015
  • Figure 7-13 Percent Increase in Aggregate Spending by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households on Household Furnishings and Equipment by Category, 2012-2015
  • Figure 7-14 Spending by Hispanic Households as Percent of Increase in Total Aggregate Spending on Furniture, Major Appliances, Small Appliances and Miscellaneous Household Equipment, 2012-2015
  • Hispanics Embrace Cellphones with More Spending
  • Table 7-10: Aggregate Spending by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households on Telephone Service by Category, 2014-2015 (in millions of dollars)
  • Figure 7-15: Percent of Total Expenditures by Hispanics and Non-Hispanics on Telephone Service Allocated to Cellphone Service, 2012 vs. 2015
  • Latinos Spend Less on Apparel
  • Table 7-11: Aggregate Spending by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households on Apparel and Footwear by Category, 2012-2015 (in millions of dollars)
  • Figure 7-16: Percent of Households Spending $400 or More on Children's Clothing, Footwear and Accessories, Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households, 2015
  • Expenditures on Food at Home Show Modest Gain
  • Figure 7-17: Increase in Aggregate Spending for Food at Home by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households, 2012 vs. 2015
  • Figure 7-18: Average Amount Spent Annually for Food at Home by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households, 2012-2015
  • Figure 7-19: Hispanic Households as Percent of Total Aggregate Spending on Food at Home, 2012-2015
  • Restaurant Spending Flat
  • Figure 7-21: Average Amount Spent Annually for Food Away From Home by Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households, 2012 vs. 2015

Chapter 8: Use of Financial Services

  • Banking Services
  • Latinos Turn to Savings Accounts
  • Figure 8-1: Percent of Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics with Checking Accounts,2005 vs. 2015
  • Figure 8-2: Percent of Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics with Savings Accounts,2005 vs. 2015
  • Latino Ownership of Bank Accounts Shows Robust Growth
  • Table 8-1: Number of Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics with Bank Accounts:By Type of Account, 2005 vs. 2015 (in thousands)
  • Figure 8-3: Hispanics as Percent of Consumers with Checking or Savings Accounts, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Credit and Debit Cards
  • Attachment to Cash Declines
  • Figure 8-4: Percent of Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics Agreeing “I Often Prefer to Pay Cash for Things I Buy,” 2005 vs. 2015
  • Dramatic Increase in Hispanic Credit Card Use
  • Figure 8-5: Percent of Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics Using Credit Cards, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Table 8-2: Number of Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics Using Credit Cards, 2005 vs. 2015 (in thousands)
  • Figure 8-6: Hispanics as Percent of Consumers Using Credit Cards, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Figure 8-7: Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics as Percent of Increase in Number of Credit Card Users, 2005-2015
  • American Express Grabs Latino Market Share
  • Table 8-3: Number of Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics Using Credit Cards:By Type of Credit Card, 2005 vs. 2015 (in thousands)
  • Use of Debit/ATM Cards More than Doubles among Latinos
  • Figure 8-8: Percent of Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics Using Debit/ATM Cards,2005 vs. 2015
  • Table 8-4: Number of Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics Using Debit/ATM Cards,2005 vs. 2015 (in thousands)
  • Figure 8-9: Hispanics as Percent of Consumers Using Debit/ATM Cards,2005 vs. 2015
  • Figure 8-10: Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics as Percent of Increase in Number of Debit/ATM Card Users, 2005-2015
  • MasterCard Debit Card Gains Among Latinos
  • Table 8-5: Number of Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics Using Debit Cards:By Type of Debit Card, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Insurance
  • Latinos Offer Growth Opportunity for Life Insurance Industry
  • Figure 8-11: Percent Agreeing “When It Comes To Life Insurance,I Make Sure I Am Well-Insured by Having All the Coverage I Need”: Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Figure 8-12: Percent of Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households Carrying Life Insurance, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Table 8-6: Number of Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households Carrying Life Insurance, 2005 vs. 2015 (in thousands)
  • Figure 8-13: Hispanic Households as Percent of Households Carrying Life Insurance, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Figure 8-14: Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households as Percent of Increase in Number of Those Carrying Life Insurance, 2005-2015
  • Health Insurance Coverage Rises among Latinos
  • Table 8-7: Number of Hispanics and Non-Hispanics Carrying Medical/Health/Hospital Insurance, 2005 vs. 2015 (in thousands)
  • Figure 8-15: Percent of Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics Carrying Medical/Health/Hospital Insurance, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Figure 8-16: Hispanics vs. Non-Hispanics as Percent of Increase in Number of Those Carrying Medical/Health/Hospital Insurance, 2005-2015
  • Latinos Account for Most of the Growth in Auto Insurance Coverage
  • Table 8-8: Number of Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households Carrying Automotive Insurance, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Figure 8-17: Percent of Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households Carrying Automotive Insurance, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Figure 8-18: Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households as Percent of Increase in Number of Those Carrying Automotive Insurance, 2005-2015
  • Tenants Insurance for Latinos Experiences Exponential Growth
  • Table 8-9: Number of Hispanic vs. Non-Hispanic Households Carrying Homeowners and Tenants Insurance, 2005 vs. 2015 (in thousands)
  • Figure 8-19: Hispanic Households as Percent of Households Carrying Homeowners Insurance, 2005 vs. 2015
  • Figure 8-20: Hispanic Households as Percent of Households Carrying Tenants Insurance, 2005 vs. 2015

Chapter 9: Marketing to Hispanic Consumers

  • Overview
  • Demographic Change Continues to Alter Marketing Landscape
  • Table 9-1: Degree of Acculturation of Latinos, 2015 (in thousands)
  • Fewer Latinos Connect with Spanish-Language Advertising
  • Figure 9-1: Attitudes of Hispanics Toward Spanish-Language Advertising,2015
  • Traditional Latinos Still Relate to Spanish-Language Advertising
  • Figure 9-2: Attitudes of Hispanics Toward Spanish-Language Advertising: By Degree of Acculturation, 2015
  • Spanish-Language Ads Can Have Broad Impact
  • Figure 9-3: Impact of Spanish-Language Advertising on Image of Advertisers,2015
  • More Hispanics Gravitate to English-Language Media
  • Figure 9-4: Media Preferences of Hispanics by Language, 2015
  • Spanish-Language Media Still the Focus of Traditional Latinos
  • Figure 9-5: English-Language Media Preferences of Hispanics:By Degree of Acculturation, 2015
  • Figure 9-6: Spanish-Language Media Preferences of Hispanics:By Degree of Acculturation, 2015
  • Millennials in Vanguard of Acculturated Latinos
  • Table 9-2: Degree of Acculturation of Latinos by Age Group, 2015(in thousands)
  • English-Language Media Dominate Among Hispanic Millennials
  • Figure 9-7: Media Preferences of Hispanic Millennials, 2015
  • Spanish-Language Ads Appeal to Millennials' Pride in Hispanic Heritage
  • Figure 9-8: Impact of Spanish-Language Advertising on Image of Advertisers:18- to 34-Year-Old vs. Older Hispanics, 2015
  • Marketing Approaches
  • Macy's Looks to Latinas with Thalia Line
  • Target Focuses on Hispanics
  • Toyota Succeeds with Hispanics
  • Financial Services Industry Sees Opportunity in Hispanic Market
  • Well Fargo Targets Hispanic Home Buyers
  • MassMutual Launches Su Negocio Program
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