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市場調查報告書

中、東歐的智慧電網市場預測

Central & Eastern Europe and Turkey Smart Grid: Market Forecast (2017 - 2027)

出版商 Northeast Group, LLC 商品編碼 268974
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 262 Pages
商品交期: 最快1-2個工作天內
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中、東歐的智慧電網市場預測 Central & Eastern Europe and Turkey Smart Grid: Market Forecast (2017 - 2027)
出版日期: 2017年09月27日 內容資訊: 英文 262 Pages
簡介

本報告提供中、東歐的智慧電網市場相關調查分析,智慧電表的市場規模,成本效益分析,大規模計劃,主要國家的獎勵驗證,也包含主要供應商的活動等,為您概述為以下內容。

摘要整理

第1章 最新趨勢

第2章 中、東歐的智慧電網概要

  • 地區比較
  • 地區的推動因素
  • 地區的課題

第3章 地區市場預測

第4章 波蘭

  • 產業結構
  • 法規環境
  • 市場預測
  • 公共事業活動

第5章 羅馬尼亞

  • 產業結構
  • 法規環境
  • 市場預測
  • 公共事業活動

第6章 土耳其

  • 產業結構
  • 法規環境
  • 市場預測
  • 公共事業活動

第7章 愛沙尼亞

  • 產業結構
  • 法規環境
  • 市場預測
  • 公共事業活動

第8章 斯洛維尼亞

  • 產業結構
  • 法規環境
  • 市場預測
  • 公共事業活動

第9章 匈牙利

  • 產業結構
  • 法規環境
  • 市場預測
  • 公共事業活動

第10章 保加利亞

  • 產業結構
  • 法規環境
  • 市場預測
  • 公共事業活動

第11章 捷克

  • 產業結構
  • 法規環境
  • 市場預測
  • 公共事業活動

第12章 斯洛伐克

  • 產業結構
  • 法規環境
  • 市場預測
  • 公共事業活動

第13章 拉脫維亞

  • 產業結構
  • 法規環境
  • 市場預測
  • 公共事業活動

第14章 克羅埃西亞

  • 產業結構
  • 法規環境
  • 市場預測
  • 公共事業活動

第15章 立陶宛

  • 產業結構
  • 法規環境
  • 市場預測
  • 公共事業活動

第16章 其他地區

  • 塞爾維亞
  • 蒙特內哥羅
  • 馬其頓
  • 阿爾巴尼亞
  • 波士尼亞與赫塞哥維納
  • 科索沃

第17章 供應商活動

  • 中、東歐為基礎的供應商
  • 在中、東歐及土耳其的智慧電網運作中的國際供應商

第18章 附錄

圖表

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目錄

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Countries in the Central & Eastern Europe (CEE) region are leaders for their smart grid and smart metering potential among emerging market nations. By 2027, ten of the 12 key countries in this study (all except for Croatia and Lithuania) will have completed smart meter deployments of at least 80% and many will have deployed other advanced smart grid infrastructure such as distribution automation, home area networks, distributed renewable sources of generation, and electric vehicle charging infrastructure. Overall, the smart grid market represents $28.6 billion of investment over the next ten years.


Volume III of this study covers 12 CEE countries in depth, as well as six additional countries. It includes the 11 countries in Central & Eastern Europe that are now part of the European Union but until the early 1990s were Communist states, as well as Turkey, Albania, and the remaining former Yugoslav countries. These countries have all undergone radical industry restructurings over the past two decades, and in some cases are still in the process of full liberalization. In most countries, the state still plays a role in one or more segments of the electricity industry. Overall power infrastructure is in many cases outdated and not compatible with a fully integrated European power market. The CEE electricity market is therefore undergoing changes, which present utilities with opportunities to invest in smart grid infrastructure in the process of upgrading their grids.

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Most of these countries must also meet EU regulations, and non-EU countries are following similar guidelines. EU Directive 2009/72/EC requires that all EU states conduct a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) for smart metering and that, if reaching a positive outcome, countries deploy smart meters to 80% of households and businesses by 2020. Most Western European countries have found net positive benefits from smart metering and launched smart metering programs to meet (or attempt to meet) EU targets. The case is less clear in the CEE region. Many countries have not officially decided, and with just three years to go, most CEE countries are expected to miss the EU target. But the EU is encouraging countries with negative CBAs to re-assess their smart meter potential in the next few years as costs come down and underlying conditions improve. Therefore, it is still likely that most CEE countries will begin large-scale deployments in the next few years.


Beyond regulations, the CEE region's core market conditions support smart meter deployments. Per-capita electricity consumption is higher than in most other emerging markets. Consumption is lower than in Western Europe but is growing faster. Meanwhile, the CEE region has stronger historic and economic ties with Russia, and recent aggressiveness from Russia has increased the importance of energy independence in the region. Finally, T&D losses and power outages are a much larger concern than in Western Europe. In some CEE countries, utilities can justify smart meter deployments through immediate loss reduction benefits, with other benefits serving as an added bonus.

The CEE region also benefits from knowledge spillovers from Western Europe. Many utilities in CEE are owned by French, German, and Italian utilities that already have experience in deploying smart grid infrastructure. Almost all of the major smart grid vendors already have a presence in CEE countries, giving them a better grasp of regulatory conditions. EU-based vendors in particular face few barriers due to the common market. Additionally, many local vendors are already active across the region, which will help drive new market segments.

Most CEE countries have not yet transposed EU smart metering regulations into national law or accepted the EU smart meter mandate. Therefore, some uncertainty still remains in the market. Still, CEE countries have conditions that support smart grid development, willing stakeholders, and well-developed pilot projects-including large-scale rollouts in some cases. The CEE smart grid market is poised for significant near-term growth.

Key questions answered in this study:

  • How large will the smart grid market be across CEE and Turkey over the next decade?
  • Which CEE countries are expected to comply with EU smart grid requirements?
  • Which CEE countries are investing in more advanced smart grid segments like DA, WAM, IT and battery storage?
  • What major international and local vendors are best positioned to supply the CEE market?

Table of Contents

i. Executive summary

1. What's new in 2017

2. Central and Eastern Europe smart grid snapshot

  • 2.1 The region in comparison
  • 2.2 Regional drivers
  • 2.3 Regional challenges

3. Regional market forecast

4. Poland

  • 4.1 Electricity industry structure
  • 4.2 Smart grid regulatory environment
  • 4.3 Market forecast
  • 4.4 Utility activity

5. Romania

  • 5.1 Electricity industry structure
  • 5.2 Smart grid regulatory environment
  • 5.3 Market forecast
  • 5.4 Utility activity

6. Turkey

  • 6.1 Electricity industry structure
  • 6.2 Smart grid regulatory environment
  • 6.3 Market forecast
  • 6.4 Utility activity

7. Estonia

  • 7.1 Electricity industry structure
  • 7.2 Smart grid regulatory environment
  • 7.3 Market forecast
  • 7.4 Utility activity

8. Slovenia

  • 8.1 Electricity industry structure
  • 8.2 Smart grid regulatory environment
  • 8.3 Market forecast
  • 8.4 Utility activity

9. Hungary

  • 9.1 Electricity industry structure
  • 9.2 Smart grid regulatory environment
  • 9.3 Market forecast
  • 9.4 Utility activity

10. Bulgaria

  • 10.1 Electricity industry structure
  • 10.2 Smart grid regulatory environment
  • 10.3 Market forecast
  • 10.4 Utility activity

11. Czech Republic

  • 11.1 Electricity industry structure
  • 11.2 Smart grid regulatory environment
  • 11.3 Market forecast
  • 11.4 Utility activity

12. Slovakia

  • 12.1 Electricity industry structure
  • 12.2 Smart grid regulatory environment
  • 12.3 Market forecast
  • 12.4 Utility activity

13. Latvia

  • 13.1 Electricity industry structure
  • 13.2 Smart grid regulatory environment
  • 13.3 Market forecast
  • 13.4 Utility activity

14. Croatia

  • 14.1 Electricity industry structure
  • 14.2 Smart grid regulatory environment
  • 14.3 Market forecast
  • 14.4 Utility activity

15. Lithuania

  • 15.1 Electricity industry structure
  • 15.2 Smart grid regulatory environment
  • 15.3 Market forecast
  • 15.4 Utility activity

16. The rest of the region

  • 16.1 Serbia
  • 16.2 Montenegro
  • 16.3 Macedonia
  • 16.4 Albania
  • 16.5 Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • 16.6 Kosovo

17. Vendor activity

  • 17.1 Domestic vendors
  • 17.2 International vendors active in smart grid in CEE & Turkey

18. Appendix

  • 18.1 Methodology
  • 18.2 Smart grid overview
  • 18.3 Global smart grid activity
  • 18.4 Renewable energy incentives
  • 18.5 List of companies covered in this report
  • 18.6 List of acronyms

List of Figures, Boxes, and Tables

  • Central & Eastern Europe smart grid: key takeaways
  • AMI deployments at top CEE distribution utilities
  • AMI deployments at Turkish distribution utilities
  • Figure 1.1 Changes in smart meter potential in CEE 2015 to 2017
  • Table 1.1: Regulatory shifts in CEE countries
  • Figure 1.2: Deployment progress in four CEE countries
  • Figure 1.3: Smart metering progress by Slovenian utilities
  • Table 1.2: Smart grid activity in CEE (as of September 2017)
  • Figure 1.4: Czech Smart Grid National Action Plan
  • Figure 1.5: Major smart grid projects in CEE (as of September 2017)
  • Table 1.3: Funding for smart grid projects in CEE region
  • Figure 1.6: Low power wide area network (LPWAN) projects in CEE
  • Figure 2.1 Emerging markets smart meter potential
  • Figure 2.2: Per-capita electricity consumption
  • Figure 2.3: Per-capita CO2 emissions
  • Figure 2.4: Projected GDP growth (2017 - 2021)
  • Box 2.1: EU Directive 2009/72/EC
  • Figure 2.5: CEE compliance with EU smart meter mandates
  • Table 2.1: European Commission recommendations for smart meter requirements
  • Table 2.2: EV public charging point targets in EU CEE countries for 2020
  • Figure 2.6: Electricity prices in emerging markets
  • Figure 2.7: Electricity prices in Europe
  • Table 2.3: 20-20-20 targets for CEE countries
  • Figure 2.8: Renewable sources of energy in CEE
  • Figure 2.9: Renewable energy promotion instruments in CEE
  • Figure 2.10: T&D losses in CEE
  • Table 2.4: Smart grid market drivers and barriers in CEE
  • Figure 2.11: Average annual GDP growth in CEE
  • Figure 2.12: Per-capita electricity consumption in CEE
  • Figure 2.13: Status of planned smart meter rollouts in CEE
  • Figure 3.1: CEE AMI penetration rate
  • Figure 3.2: CEE cumulative smart grid forecast by country
  • Table 3.1: CEE cumulative smart grid forecast data by country
  • Figure 3.3: CEE cumulative smart grid forecast
  • Table 3.2: CEE cumulative smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 3.4: Annual AMI deployments in CEE
  • Figure 3.5: AMI cost breakdown
  • Figure 3.6: Per-endpoint smart meter cost estimates
  • Figure 3.7: AMI forecast by segment
  • Table 3.3: AMI forecast data by segment
  • Figure 3.8: DA forecast by segment
  • Table 3.4: DA forecast data by segment
  • Figure 3.9: HEM forecast by segment
  • Table 3.5: HEM forecast data by segment
  • Figure 3.10: IT forecast by segment
  • Table 3.6: IT forecast data by segment
  • Table 4.1: Poland key data
  • Figure 4.1: Poland AMI penetration rate
  • Table 4.2: Smart grid indicators in Poland
  • Figure 4.2: New and decommissioned generation in Poland
  • Table 4.3: Poland's smart grid roadmap
  • Box 4.1: Political risk in Poland
  • Figure 4.3: Poland smart grid forecast
  • Table 4.4: Poland smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 4.4: Poland AMI forecast
  • Table 4.5: Poland AMI forecast data
  • Table 4.6: Landis+Gyr Smart Grid Terminal (SGT) shipments
  • Table 4.7: Confirmed smart meter deployments in Polish utilities
  • Table 4.8: Latest smart grid projects in Poland
  • Table 4.9: Additional smart grid projects in Poland
  • Table 5.1: Romania key data
  • Figure 5.1: Romania AMI penetration rate
  • Table 5.2: Smart grid indicators in Romania
  • Box 5.1: Political risk in Romania
  • Table 5.3: Romania's expected smart meter deployment investments
  • Figure 5.2: CAIDI in select CEE countries
  • Figure 5.3: Romania smart grid forecast
  • Table 5.4: Romania smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 5.4: Romania AMI forecast
  • Table 5.5: Romania AMI forecast data
  • Figure 5.5: Enel AMI deployments in Romania
  • Figure 5.6: Recent and upcoming Romania smart grid projects
  • Table 5.6: Additional smart grid projects in Romania
  • Table 6.1: Turkey key data
  • Figure 6.1: Turkey AMI penetration rate
  • Table 6.2: Smart grid indicators in Turkey
  • Table 6.3: Distribution utilities in Turkey
  • Figure 6.2: AMI deployments at Turkish distribution utilities
  • Figure 6.3: Amendments to Turkish Distribution System Revenues
  • Box 6.1: Political risk in Turkey
  • Figure 6.4: Turkey smart grid forecast
  • Table 6.4: Turkey smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 6.5: Turkey AMI forecast
  • Table 6.5: Turkey AMI forecast data
  • Figure 6.6: Smart grid activity in Turkey
  • Table 6.6: AMI installments by distribution utilities in Turkey
  • Table 7.1: Estonia key data
  • Figure 7.1: Estonia AMI penetration rate
  • Table 7.2: Smart grid indicators in Estonia
  • Box 7.1: Political risk in Estonia
  • Figure 7.2: Estonia's E-Mobility operating model
  • Figure 7.3: Estonia smart grid forecast
  • Table 7.3: Estonia smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 7.4: Estonia AMI forecast
  • Table 7.4: Estonia AMI forecast data
  • Table 7.5: Additional smart grid projects in Estonia
  • Table 8.1: Slovenia key data
  • Figure 8.1: Slovenia AMI penetration rate
  • Table 8.2: Smart grid indicators in Slovenia
  • Box 8.1: Political risk in Slovenia
  • Figure 8.2: Estimated monthly household power bills in CEE
  • Figure 8.3: Slovenia smart grid forecast
  • Table 8.3: Slovenia smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 8.4: Slovenia AMI forecast
  • Table 8.4: Slovenia AMI forecast data
  • Figure 8.5: Smart metering progress by Slovenian utilities
  • Table 8.5: Smart grid priorities in Slovenia
  • Table 8.6: Additional smart grid projects in Slovenia
  • Table 9.1: Hungary key data
  • Figure 9.1: Hungary AMI penetration rate
  • Table 9.2: Smart grid indicators in Hungary
  • Box 9.1: Political risk in Hungary
  • Figure 9.2: Hungary smart meter regulatory progress
  • Figure 9.3: Public support for smart metering in Hungary (2013)
  • Figure 9.4: Hungary smart grid forecast
  • Table 9.3: Hungary smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 9.5: Hungary AMI forecast
  • Table 9.4: Hungary AMI forecast data
  • Table 9.5: Additional smart grid projects in Hungary
  • Table 10.1: Bulgaria key data
  • Figure 10.1: Bulgaria AMI penetration rate
  • Table 10.2: Smart grid indicators in Bulgaria
  • Box 10.1: Political risk in Bulgaria
  • Table 10.3: Ease of business rankings
  • Figure 10.2: Bulgaria smart grid forecast
  • Table 10.4: Bulgaria smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 10.3: Bulgaria AMI forecast
  • Table 10.5: Bulgaria AMI forecast data
  • Figure 10.4: Bulgaria smart grid activity
  • Table 10.6: Additional smart grid projects in Bulgaria
  • Table 11.1: Czech Republic key data
  • Figure 11.1: Czech Republic AMI penetration rate
  • Table 11.2: Smart grid indicators in Czech Republic
  • Box 11.1: Political risk in Czech Republic
  • Figure 11.2: Czech Smart Grid National Action Plan
  • Figure 11.3: Planned renewable energy development in Czech Republic
  • Figure 11.4: Czech Republic smart grid forecast
  • Table 11.3: Czech Republic smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 11.5: Czech Republic AMI forecast
  • Table 11.4: Czech Republic AMI forecast data
  • Table 11.5: Other CEZ smart grid pilot programs
  • Table 11.6: Additional smart grid projects in Czech Republic
  • Table 12.1: Slovakia key data
  • Figure 12.1: Slovakia AMI penetration rate
  • Table 12.2: Smart grid indicators in Slovakia
  • Box 12.1: Political risk in Slovakia
  • Figure 12.2: Slovakia smart grid forecast
  • Table 12.3: Slovakia smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 12.3: Slovakia AMI forecast
  • Table 12.4: Slovakia AMI forecast data
  • Table 12.5: Additional smart grid projects in Slovakia
  • Table 13.1: Latvia key data
  • Figure 13.1: Latvia AMI penetration rate
  • Table 13.2: Smart grid indicators in Latvia
  • Box 13.1: Political risk in Latvia
  • Figure 13.2: Latvia smart grid forecast
  • Table 13.3: Latvia smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 13.3: Latvia AMI forecast
  • Table 13.4: Latvia AMI forecast data
  • Figure 13.4: Sadales Tikls deployment schedule
  • Table 13.5: Additional smart grid projects in Latvia
  • Table 14.1: Croatia key data
  • Figure 14.1: Croatia AMI penetration rate
  • Table 14.2: Smart grid indicators in Croatia
  • Box 14.1: Political risk in Croatia
  • Figure 14.2: Croatia smart grid forecast
  • Table 14.3: Croatia smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 14.3: Croatia AMI forecast
  • Table 14.4: Croatia AMI forecast data
  • Table 14.5: Additional smart grid projects in Croatia
  • Table 15.1: Lithuania key data
  • Figure 15.1: Lithuania AMI penetration rate
  • Table 15.2: Smart grid indicators in Lithuania
  • Box 15.1: Political risk in Lithuania
  • Figure 15.2: Lithuania smart grid regulatory development
  • Table 15.3: Lithuania smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 15.3: Lithuania smart grid forecast
  • Table 15.4: Lithuania AMI forecast data
  • Figure 15.4: Lithuania AMI forecast
  • Table 15.5: Additional smart grid projects in Lithuania
  • Table 16.1: Key data for other CEE countries
  • Table 16.2: EBRD smart grid loans to former Yugoslav countries
  • Figure 16.1: Other CEE smart grid forecast
  • Table 16.3: Other CEE smart grid forecast data
  • Figure 16.2: Other CEE AMI forecast
  • Table 16.4: Other CEE AMI forecast data
  • Figure 16.3: Smart grid projects in the rest of the CEE region
  • Table 16.5 : Key Smart grid projects in other countries
  • Table 16.6 : Additional smart grid projects in other countries
  • Figure 17.1: Leading smart grid vendors in CEE
  • Table 17.1: Other leading smart grid vendors in CEE
  • Figure 18.1: Smart grid value chain
  • Figure 18.2: Smart grid model highlighting focus in CEE
  • Table 18.1: Benefits of AMI in CEE
  • Table 18.2: Electric vehicle subsidies in CEE
  • Table 18.3: Demand response options
  • Figure 18.3: Transmission interconnections in CEE
  • Figure 18.4: Global smart grid activity
  • Figure 18.5: Cumulative smart grid investment from 2017 - 2027 by region ($m)
  • Figure 18.6: Annual smart grid and AMI investment by region in 2027
  • Table 18.4: Global smart grid drivers and activity
  • Figure 18.7: Solar and wind installed capacity in CEE (2015)
  • Table 18.5: Wind and solar feed-in tariffs and premiums in CEE
  • Table 18.6: Electric vehicle data in Central & Eastern Europe
  • Table 18.7: Cost comparison in Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia CBAs
  • Table 18.8: Examples of quantifying smart meter benefits in Slovakia
  • Table 18.9: Sensitivity analysis for smart metering cost-benefit analyses
  • Table 18.10: NPV in Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia
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