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市場調查報告書

物聯網(IoT)、無線網路:技術、商務促進要素、市場展望

Internet of Things (IoT) and Wireless Networks: Technologies, Business Drivers, and Market Outlook

出版商 Mind Commerce 商品編碼 300925
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 157 Pages
商品交期: 最快1-2個工作天內
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物聯網(IoT)、無線網路:技術、商務促進要素、市場展望 Internet of Things (IoT) and Wireless Networks: Technologies, Business Drivers, and Market Outlook
出版日期: 2014年05月02日 內容資訊: 英文 157 Pages
簡介

本報告提供著重商機、產業市場及主要應用的物聯網(IoT)的業務促進要素、技術及未來展望的相關調查、連網家庭、聯網汽車,及產業用網際網路的主要市場上IoT的引進分析、IoT的長期性成功的重要課題、成功因素分析彙整,為您概述為以下內容。

摘要整理

第1章 簡介

第2章 支撐IoT的根本技術

  • 連網型設備
  • 宏區域無線:行動電話
    • 最普及的數位行動電話系統:2G和3G
    • 第4代(4G)行動電話
    • 異構網絡(HetNet)
  • 宏區域無線:非行動電話
    • WiMAX
    • 衛星
  • 短距離無線
    • WiFi
    • LiFi
    • RFID
    • Bluetooth
    • ZigBee
    • UWB
    • DSRC(Dedicated Short-range Communications)
    • Beacon Technologies
  • IPv6
  • 感測器、檢測技術
  • 資料儲存/經營管理
  • API、資料整合
  • M2M
  • 穿戴式無線、運算
  • AR、媒體
  • 巨量資料,預測分析及商業智慧
  • IoT、雲端技術/解決方案
  • IoT 協調、編制

第3章 各產業市場上IoT

  • 零售
  • 智慧城市
  • 醫療
  • 運輸
  • 供應鏈管理
  • 環境管理
  • 電力管理

第4章 IoT和連網家庭

  • 機會、障礙
  • 住宅應用
    • 安全系統
    • 智慧電網應用
    • 月台資訊娛樂
    • 老年人監測
    • 智慧家電

第5章 IoT和聯網汽車

  • 汽車的連網型設備
  • 連網型汽車應用
  • 線上連網型汽車

第6章 IoT和產業用網際網路

  • 能源管理
  • 設備管理
  • 遠距離操縱、遠距遙控機器人
  • 智慧製造

第7章 促進IoT的主要創新趨勢

  • 何時何地,任何設備都能存取
  • 對非人類通訊的關注增加
  • 匯流、許多東西的整合
  • 開放式網路、介面
  • 無所不在的無線存取、連接
  • 環境智能

第8章 IoT的長期性成功的主要課題

  • 設備、介面的互通性
  • 開放性:介面、標準等
  • 結構、管理的容易度

第9章 附錄

  • IoT的安全和隱私
  • 促進IoT的主要企業
  • IoT和非結構化(巨量)資料
  • IoT與雲端
  • IoT、DaaS及API(通訊和企業)

圖表清單

目錄

The world is moving beyond standalone devices into a new era where everything is connected. The Internet of Things (IoT) refers to uniquely identifiable objects (things) and their virtual representations in an Internet-like structure. Stated differently, the concept involves the notion that there are many things (assets, objects, etc.) in the world that may be addressed/labeled/cataloged for various purposes. The Internet is associated with and mapped to the real world by attaching object tags with URLs as meta-objects to tangible objects or locations.

In addition to the wireless technologies that make connecting different things possible, there are wide number of technologies that gain benefit from the IoT or support it. Since the technology of IoT will have an unlimited number of devices there will many of technologies evolved whether to deploy, manage or even identify things.

This research addresses the business drivers, technologies and future outlook for the Internet of Things (IoT) with an emphasis on business opportunities, industry sectors, and leading applications. The report includes analysis of leading sectors to adopt IoT: Connected Homes, Connected Vehicles, and Industrial Internet. The report also includes analysis of key issues and success factors for the long-term success of IoT.

Purchasers of this report at the Team License or higher level will also receive an enterprise license of the following company-specific reports at no additional cost:

  • Internet of Things (IoT) Leaders: Intel
  • Internet of Things (IoT) Leaders: Oracle
  • Internet of Things (IoT) Leaders: Cisco
  • Internet of Things (IoT) Leaders: Qualcomm

Report Benefits:

  • Identify business drivers for IoT
  • Identify leading IoT applications
  • Understand IoT supporting technologies
  • Identify key issues for the long term success of IoT
  • Understand the dynamics of IoT in leading industry verticals
  • Obtain reports on IoT leaders: Intel, Oracle, Cisco, and Qualcomm

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

1. Introduction

  • 1.1. Defining IoT
  • 1.2. Embedded Systems and IoT
  • 1.3. Ubiquitous Computing
  • 1.4. Teleoperation and IoT
  • 1.5. IoT Industry Groups
  • 1.6. IoT Communication Protocols and Standards
    • 1.6.1. Many Organizations and Many Standards Efforts
    • 1.6.2. Overlapping Standards, Protocols and Technical Approaches
  • 1.7. IoT Solutions and Applications

2. Underlying Technologies Supporting IoT

  • 2.1. Connected Devices
  • 2.2. Macro Area Wireless: Cellular
    • 2.2.1. Most Prevalent Digital Cellular Systems: 2G and 3G
    • 2.2.2. 4th Generation (4G) Cellular
      • 2.2.2.1. LTE Direct (LTE-D)
      • 2.2.2.2. LTE Advanced
    • 2.2.3. Heterogeneous Networks (HetNet)
  • 2.3. Macro Area Wireless: Non-cellular
    • 2.3.1. WiMAX
    • 2.3.2. Satellite
  • 2.4. Short Range Wireless
    • 2.4.1. WiFi
    • 2.4.2. LiFi
    • 2.4.3. RF Identification (RFID)
    • 2.4.4. Bluetooth
    • 2.4.5. ZigBee
    • 2.4.6. Ultra Wide Band (UWB)
    • 2.4.7. Dedicated Short-range Communications
    • 2.4.8. Beacon Technologies
  • 2.5. Internet Protocol version Six (IPv6)
  • 2.6. Sensors and Detection Technologies
  • 2.7. Data Storage/Management
  • 2.8. APIs and Data Integration
  • 2.9. Machine-to-Machine (M2M)
  • 2.10. Wearable Wireless and Computing
  • 2.11. Augmented Reality and Media
  • 2.12. Big Data, Predictive Analysis, and Business Intelligence
  • 2.13. IoT and Cloud Technologies/Solutions
  • 2.14. IoT Mediation and Orchestration

3. IoT in Industry Verticals

  • 3.1. Retail
  • 3.2. Smart Cities
  • 3.3. Healthcare
  • 3.4. Transportation
  • 3.5. Supply Chain Management
  • 3.6. Environmental Control
  • 3.7. Power Management

4. IoT and Connected Homes

  • 4.1. Opportunities and Obstacles
  • 4.2. Residential Applications
    • 4.2.1. Security Systems
    • 4.2.2. Smart Grid Applications
    • 4.2.3. Home Infotainment
    • 4.2.4. Elderly Monitoring
    • 4.2.5. Smart Appliances

5. IoT and Connected Cars

  • 5.1. Connected Devices in Vehicles
  • 5.2. Connected Automotive Apps
    • 5.2.1. A Mixture of Safety Features and Concerns
    • 5.2.2. Connected Car Challenges
  • 5.3. Online-Connected Automobiles
    • 5.3.1. Connected Commercial Vehicles
    • 5.3.2. Connected Cars: AT&T
    • 5.3.3. Connected Cars: BMW

6. IoT and the Industrial Internet

  • 6.1. Energy Control
  • 6.2. Facilities Control
  • 6.3. Teleoperation and Telerobotics
  • 6.4. Smart Manufacturing

7. Key Evolutionary Trends Driving IoT

  • 7.1. Anytime, Anywhere, Any Device Access
  • 7.2. Increased Emphasis on Non-human Communications
  • 7.3. Convergence and Integration of Many Things
  • 7.4. Open Networks and Interfaces
  • 7.5. Ubiquitous Wireless Access and Connectivity
  • 7.6. Ambient Intelligence: Self-aware Networks and Devices

8. Key Issues to the Long-term Success of IoT

  • 8.1. Device and Interface Interoperability
  • 8.2. Openness: Interfaces, Standards, and More
  • 8.3. Ease of Configuration and Administration

9. Appendix

  • 9.1. Security and Privacy in IoT
    • 9.1.1. Illustrative IoT Concern Area: Connected Homes
    • 9.1.2. Illustrative IoT Concern Area: Wearable Technology
    • 9.1.3. Identity, Personal Data, and Preference Management
  • 9.2. Leading Companies Driving IoT
    • 9.2.1. Cisco
      • 9.2.1.1. Cisco's Vision for Internet of Everything
      • 9.2.1.2. Cisco's IoT Related Predictions
    • 9.2.2. Intel
      • 9.2.2.1. Intel's Vision for IoT
        • 9.2.2.1.1. Three Pillars of IoT
        • 9.2.2.1.2. Real-world IoT-driven Applications
      • 9.2.2.2. Intel Positioning Itself for Success in IoT
    • 9.2.3. Oracle
      • 9.2.3.1. Oracle and IoT
      • 9.2.3.2. Oracle's Vision for IoT
    • 9.2.4. Qualcomm
      • 9.2.4.1. Qualcomm and IoT
      • 9.2.4.2. Qualcomm's Vision for IoT
  • 9.3. IoT and Unstructured (Big) Data
    • 9.3.1. IoT and System Generated Data
    • 9.3.2. IoT and Machine Generated Data
  • 9.4. IoT and the Cloud
  • 9.5. IoT, DaaS, and APIs (Telecom and Enterprise)

List of Figures

  • Figure 1: Everything becomes Connected
  • Figure 2: The Evolution of IoT
  • Figure 3: IoT Industry Roadmap 2000-2020
  • Figure 4: Growth of Connected Devices
  • Figure 5: Market Share by Wireless Technology
  • Figure 6: Evolution of LTE in time
  • Figure 7: HetNet Topology
  • Figure 8: WiMAX Communications
  • Figure 9: RFID Chip Compared to a Grain of Rice
  • Figure 10: Embedded Thermal Sensors
  • Figure 11: Sensors in Macro Environment for IoT
  • Figure 12: Automated Retail
  • Figure 13: Hybrid System Architecture for Healthcare - WAITER
  • Figure 14: Connected Home
  • Figure 15: Sensors in the Connected Home
  • Figure 16: Energy Smart Home Lab
  • Figure 17: Smart and Connected TV
  • Figure 18: Global TV: Smart vs. Traditional 2013 - 2017
  • Figure 19: Elderly Tracking
  • Figure 20: Connected Vehicle Console
  • Figure 21: Connect Vehicles by Application Type 2014 - 2019
  • Figure 22: IoT in Industrial Automation
  • Figure 23: IoT in Facilities Control
  • Figure 24: IoT and Telecom API Topology
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