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市場調查報告書

MENA(中東、北非)的太陽能市場報告

Middle East and North Africa Solar Energy Report 2014

出版商 MEED Insight 商品編碼 294334
出版日期 內容資訊 英文
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MENA(中東、北非)的太陽能市場報告 Middle East and North Africa Solar Energy Report 2014
出版日期: 2014年01月06日 內容資訊: 英文
簡介

MENA地區的太陽能市場急速成長。全部的國家將2020年定為再生能源目標年,結果不僅是大規模、並聯型CSP及PV機構,對小規模、獨立型自備發電、屋頂面板及太陽能發電的水電熱器單位於也有數十億美元的投資。

本報告提供MENA(中東、北非)的太陽能發電(PV、CSP及小規模單位)市場相關資料、法規政策與策略、主要的客戶、財政的獎勵及金融機制、全面的概要、現在與未來的企劃的詳細分析彙整,為您概述為以下內容。

第1章 序文

第2章 由Middle East Solar Industry Association (Mesia) 的推動

第3章 摘要整理

第4章 簡介

  • 獨立型的課題
  • 技術
    • PV
    • CSP
    • ISCC
  • 海水淡化的太陽能發電
  • 中東的再生能源成本

第5章 各地區的再生能源計劃及機關

  • 計劃
  • 機關

第6章 埃及

  • 政策形勢
  • 法規政策
  • 太陽能企劃
  • 埃及的主要企業

第7章 摩洛哥

  • 政策形勢
  • 太陽能企劃

第8章 約旦

  • 政策形勢
  • 太陽能企劃
  • 主要企業

第9章 沙烏地阿拉伯

  • 政策形勢
  • 法規政策
  • KA-Care計劃
  • 其他太陽能企劃
  • 主要企業

第10章 UAE

  • 簡介
  • 杜拜
  • 主要企業

第11章 阿爾及利亞

  • 政策形勢
  • 太陽能企劃
  • 主要企業

第12章 科威特

  • 政策形勢
  • 法規政策
  • 財務計劃
  • 太陽能企劃
  • 主要企業

第13章 卡達

  • 政策形勢
  • 法規政策
  • 太陽能企劃
  • 主要企業

第14章 伊拉克

  • 政策形勢
  • 太陽能企劃
  • 主要企業

第15章 其他地區太陽能市場摘要

  • 突尼西亞
  • 利比亞
  • 巴林
  • 阿曼

第16章 結論

圖表清單

目錄

An in-depth assessment of the fast-growing solar power market in the MENA region

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The solar energy sector is a fast growing market in the region. With all countries now having stated 2020 renewable energy targets and some of the best irradiation levels on Earth, solar energy is the largest component of governments' strategies to achieve such targets. As a result, billions of dollars is set to be invested in large-scale, on-grid CSP and PV facilities as well as small-scale, off-grid self-generating, rooftop panel, and solar-powered water heater units.

MEED Insight's latest market intelligence report, the MENA Solar Energy report, provides a comprehensive overview of the solar (PV, CSP, and small-scale unit) market in the Middle East focusing on the regulatory policies and strategies, key clients, fiscal incentives and financing mechanisms and a detailed breakdown of current and future projects.


Prepared in co-ordination with the Middle East Solar Industry Association (Mesia) , the MENA Solar Energy report is the ultimate reference document for anyone involved in the solar energy industry interested in winning or expanding business in the region.

Key benefits and features:

  • Access breakdown of over $50bn worth of solar energy opportunities in the region
  • Learn how you can take advantage of financing opportunities
  • Obtain rankings of the key players and their projects
  • Understand the key policies and regulations for solar energy development in each country

The report explores each country's strategy and policy with regards to solar energy and assesses what financing mechanisms and fiscal incentives have been implemented to achieve their renewable energy ambitions.

The policy landscape section on each country looks at the key government players responsible for solar energy development, the objectives and targets for solar energy production, and the regulatory frameworks and mechanisms such as feed-in tariffs, quotas, net metering and renewable energy certification that have been put in place to accelerate solar energy development.

This research report also assesses the fiscal incentives available to investors whether they are in the form of capital subsidies, investment/production credits or energy production payments. It also examines financing opportunities such as project finance, development bank aid and government funds that investors that can utilize to develop their projects.

Comprising more than 150 pages, the report provides a comprehensive breakdown of current and future solar projects by technology, including clients, budgets, locations and other relevant data.

Save time and investment on research and analysis. Gather exclusive data on the MENA solar energy market through this in-depth examination.

Key figures

  • Of the 13 states covered in the report, installed electricity generating capacity totalled more than 185,000MW at the end of 2012. Of this, over 6,800MW, representing 4 per cent of the total, came from renewable energy sources.
  • The majority of existing renewable capacity comes in the form of hydroelectric power plants with a total capacity of 5,603MW. Of the remaining renewable energy capacity in the Mena region at the end of 2012, wind was by far the largest segment, totalling 1,038MW. Installed solar capacity, excluding the thermal elements on integrated solar combined-cycle (ISCC) schemes, stood at 205MW as of end 2013.
  • If renewable energy capacity targets are met by 2020, installed renewables capacity will grow eightfold to just under 56,000MW. The estimated direct investment in these renewable projects, excluding transmission and distribution investments, will be $190bn at 2013 prices. The 56,000MW figure is more than double the 27,000MW 2020 capacity target announced by Arab states when this report was first written in late 2011, highlighting the acceleration in interest in the renewables sector over the past two years.
  • The majority of this will be in the form of solar energy, particularly new CSP and ISCC capacity. Investment in solar energy is likely therefore to be in excess of $50bn over the next decade in the region.

Table of Contents

1. Preface

2. Forward by MESIA

3. Executive Summary

4. Introduction

  • 4.1 The off-grid challenge
  • 4.2 Technologies
    • 4.2.1 PV
    • 4.2.1 CSP
    • 4.2.1 ISCC
  • 4.3 Solar power in desalination
  • 4.4 Costs of renewables in the Middle East

5. Regional renewable energy initiatives and institutions

  • 5.1 Initiatives
    • 5.1.1 Desertec
    • 5.1.2 The Mediterranean Solar Plan
  • 5.2 Institutions
    • 5.2.1 The International Renewable Energy Agency (Irena), UAE
    • 5.2.2 Regional Centre for Renewable Energies and Energy Efficiency (RCREEE), Egypt
    • 5.2.3 King Abdullah City for Atomic & Renewable Energy (KA-Care), Saudi Arabia
    • 5.2.4 Masdar, UAE
    • 5.2.5 Qatar National Food Security Programme (QNFSP), Qatar
    • 5.2.6 Middle East Solar Industry Association (Mesia)

6. Egypt

  • 6.1 Policy landscape
    • 6.1.1 Structure
    • 6.1.2 Fuel mix
  • 6.2 Regulatory policy
    • 6.2.1 Fiscal incentives
    • 6.2.2 Financing opportunities
  • 6.3 Solar projects
    • 6.3.1 Current projects
    • 6.3.2 Future solar projects
  • 6.4 Egypt key players

7. Morocco

  • 7.1 Policy landscape
    • 7.1.1 Structure
    • 7.1.2 Fuel mix
    • 7.1.3 Regulatory policy
    • 7.1.4 Fiscal incentives
    • 7.1.5 Financing options
  • 7.2 Solar Projects
    • 7.2.1 Current projects
    • 7.2.2 Future projects
    • 7.3 Morocco key players

8. Jordan

  • 8.1 Policy landscape
    • 8.1.1 Structure
    • 8.1.2 Fuel mix
    • 8.1 Regulatory policy
    • 8.1.1 Fiscal incentives
    • 8.1.2 Financing opportunities
  • 8.2 Solar projects
    • 8.2.1 Current projects
    • 8.2.2 Future projects
  • 8.3 Jordan key players

9. Saudi Arabia

  • 9.1 Policy landscape
    • 9.1.1 Structure
    • 9.1.2 Fuel mix
  • 9.2 Regulatory policy
    • 9.2.1 Fiscal incentives
    • 9.2.2 Financing opportunities
  • 9.3 The KA-Care programme
    • 9.3.1 Eligible technologies
    • 9.3.2 Eligibility
    • 9.3.3 Hybrid facilities
    • 9.3.4 Timing and number of bid rounds
    • 9.3.5 Job localisation
    • 9.3.6 Research and development
    • 9.3.7 KA-Care targets
  • 9.4 Other solar projects
    • 9.4.1 Current projects
  • 9.5 Saudi Arabia key players

10. The UAE

  • 10.1 Introduction
    • 10.1 Abu Dhabi
    • 10.1.1 Policy landscape
    • 10.1.2 Structure
    • 10.1.3 Fuel mix
    • 10.1.4 Regulatory policy
    • 10.1.5 Fiscal incentives
    • 10.1.6 Financing opportunities
    • 10.1.7 Solar projects
    • 10.1.8 Current projects
    • 10.1.9 Future projects
  • 10.2 Dubai
    • 10.2.1 Policy landscape
    • 10.2.2 Structure
    • 10.2.3 Fuel mix
    • 10.2.4 Regulatory policy
    • 10.2.5 Fiscal incentives
    • 10.2.6 Financing opportunities
    • 10.2.7 Solar projects
  • 10.3 UAE key players

11. Algeria

  • 11.1 Policy landscape
    • 11.1.1 Structure
    • 11.1.2 Fuel mix
    • 11.1 Regulatory policy
    • 11.1.1 Fiscal incentives
    • 11.1.2 Financing opportunities
  • 11.2 Solar projects
    • 11.2.1 Current projects
    • 11.2.2 Future projects
  • 11.3 Algeria key players

12. Kuwait

  • 12.1 Policy landscape
    • 12.1.1 Structure
    • 12.1.2 Fuel mix
  • 12.2 Regulatory policy
  • 12.3 Fiscal incentives
  • 12.4 Solar projects
    • 12.4.1 Current solar projects
    • 12.4.2 Future solar projects
  • 12.5 Kuwait key players

13. Qatar

  • 13.1 Policy landscape
    • 13.1.1 Structure
    • 13.1.2 Fuel mix
  • 13.2 Regulatory policy
    • 13.2.1 Fiscal incentives
    • 13.2.2 Financing opportunities
  • 13.3 Solar projects
    • 13.3.1 Current projects
  • 13.4 Qatar key players

14. Iraq

  • 14.1 Policy landscape
    • 14.1.1 Structure
    • 14.1.2 Fuel mix
    • 14.1 Regulatory policy
    • 14.1.1 Fiscal incentives
    • 14.1.2 Financing opportunities
  • 14.2 Solar projects
    • 14.2.1 Current projects
    • 14.2.2 Future projects
  • 14.3 Iraq key players

15. Summary of other regional solar markets

  • 15.1 Tunisia
    • 15.1.1 Regulatory framework
    • 15.1.2 Solar projects
    • 15.1.3 PV
    • 15.1.4 CSP
    • 15.1.5 Tunisia key players
  • 15.2 Libya
    • 15.2.1 Regulatory framework
    • 15.2.2 Solar projects
    • 15.2.3 Libya key players
  • 15.3 Bahrain
    • 15.3.1 Regulatory framework
    • 15.3.2 Solar projects
    • 15.3.3 Bahrain key players
  • 15.4 Oman
    • 15.4.1 Regulatory framework
    • 15.4.2 Solar projects
    • 15.4.3 Oman key players

16. Conclusion

List of tables

  • Table 1: The structure of global power, 2011-30 (TWh)
  • Table 2: The Mena power sector key figures
  • Table 3: Summary of renewable energy support policies and targets in the Mena 14
  • Table 4: Comparison of main CSP technologies
  • Table 5: Average production costs for different electricity generating plants in Oman*
  • Table 6: Egypt power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 7: Fuel consumption by the power sector, 2010-12
  • Table 8: Egypt renewable electricity performance indicators
  • Table 9: Kureimat ISCC key facts
  • Table 10: Egypt current and future solar projects
  • Table 11: Morocco power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 12: Morocco renewable electricity performance indicators
  • Table 13: Generation capacity by feedstock, 2011-12 (MW)
  • Table 14: Noor 1 key facts
  • Table 15: Morocco's current and future solar projects
  • Table 16: Jordanian power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 17: Jordan's planned fuel sources for electricity generation, 2012-20 (%)
  • Table 18: Jordan renewable electricity performance indicators
  • Table 19: Jordanian feed-in tariff rates
  • Table 20: Prequalified companies and groups for solar elements of round 1 of the Jordanian renewable energy programme
  • Table 21: Prequalified companies for the Quweira PV plant
  • Table 22: Jordan current and future solar projects
  • Table 23: Saudi Arabia power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 24: Power capacity by owner, 2012
  • Table 25: Renewable electricity performance indicators
  • Table 26: Indicative size of the first two renewable energy procurement rounds
  • Table 27: Key aspects of the KA-Care procurement programme
  • Table 28: UAE renewable electricity performance indicators
  • Table 29: Abu Dhabi power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 30: Dubai power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 31: Algeria power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 32: Algeria renewable electricity performance indicators
  • Table 33: Solar feed-in tariffs
  • Table 34: Solar potential by area
  • Table 35: Neal's proposed ISCC programme
  • Table 36: Kuwait power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 37: Renewable electricity performance indicators
  • Table 38: Prequalifiers for Kisr's first phase solar energy pilot plants
  • Table 39: Results of Kisr's first phase two solar pilot plants, November 2013*
  • Table 40: Kuwait future solar projects
  • Table 41: Qatar power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 42: Renewable electricity performance indicators
  • Table 43: Iraq power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 44: Iraq excluding Kurdistan: structure of power generation capacity, 2013 (MW)
  • Table 45: Iraq's renewable electricity performance indicators
  • Table 46: Iraqi renewable energy projects, 2013-16, stage one: off-grid units under evaluation
  • Table 47: Iraq's plan for self-generating and solar water heaters, March 2013
  • Table 48: Tunisia power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 49: Renewable electricity performance indicators
  • Table 50: The Tunisian Solar Plan
  • Table 51: Libya power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 52: Reaol's 2008 renewable energy targets, 2015-25
  • Table 53: Reaol's 2013 proposed national strategy for the development of renewable energy
  • Table 54: Libya renewable electricity performance indicators
  • Table 55: Bahrain power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 56: Renewable electricity performance indicators
  • Table 57: Oman power sector key facts, 2012
  • Table 58: Renewable electricity performance indicators

List of figures

  • Figure 1: World renewable electricity capacity and forecast (GW)
  • Figure 2: Annual solar radiation levels in selected countries
  • Figure 3: The 14 Mena states covered in this report
  • Figure 4: The share of renewable energy capacity in the Mena power sector, 2013 (MW)
  • Figure 5: The breakdown of Mena renewable energy capacity by source, 2013 (MW)
  • Figure 6: Mena 2020 official or implied renewable energy targets as a % of total installed capacity.
  • Figure 7: Mena 2020 official or implied renewable energy capacity
  • Figure 8: PV technologies
  • Figure 9: The cost comparison of thin film and crystalline silicon, 2009-15 ($/W)
  • Figure 10: Solar cell efficiency for various PV technologies, 1975-2010 (%)
  • Figure 11: Projected growth of CSP-generated electricity by region, 2010-50 (TWh/y)
  • Figure 12: Projected production and consumption of CSP-generated electricity by 2050 (TWh)
  • Figure 13: Selected ISCC/CSP projects in operation and under construction in the Mena region
  • Figure 14: The Ain Beni Mathar ISCC
  • Figure 15: Differences in gas costs and solar and wind energy production rates
  • Figure 16: Global cost projection for solar and conventional power generation ($/KWh)
  • Figure 17: GCC cost projection for solar and conventional power generation ($/kWh)
  • Figure 18: When will solar energy achieve cost parity?
  • Figure 19: Global levelised costs of power generation ranges, first quarter of 2013
  • Figure 20: Desertec EU MENA
  • Figure 21: Outline plan of Trans-Mediterranean power lines
  • Figure 22: Structure of the Egyptian electricity sector
  • Figure 23: Egyptian installed generating capacity by source, 2012 (MW)
  • Figure 24: Solar thermal electricity generating potentials in Egypt
  • Figure 25: The Kureimat ISCC
  • Figure 26: Energy mix by year, 2006-12
  • Figure 27: Direct normal irradiation map of Morocco
  • Figure 28: Global horizontal irradiation map of Morocco
  • Figure 29: The five key sites in the Moroccan Integrated Solar Energy Generation Project (needs to be updated)
  • Figure 30: Jordan power production by source, 2010 (GWh)
  • Figure 31: Projected peak power demand, 2010-20 (MW)
  • Figure 32: Jordan's targeted energy mix, 2020 (%)
  • Figure 33: Global horizontal irradiance map of Jordan
  • Figure 34: Direct normal irradiance map of Jordan
  • Figure 35: Jordan map of small-scale PV applications
  • Figure 36: Power peak demand growth, 2008-12
  • Figure 37: Breakdown of power production by feedstock, 2011
  • Figure 38: Projected annual oil consumption by the power sector, 2011-30
  • Figure 39: KA-Care's planned deployment of solar energy* (MW)
  • Figure 40: Solar thermal electricity generating potentials in Saudi Arabia
  • Figure 41: Annual global horizontal irradiation potentials in Saudi Arabia
  • Figure 42: Solar thermal electricity generating potentials in the UAE
  • Figure 43: Abu Dhabi sector structure
  • Figure 44: Adwea total fuel consumption, 2009-11
  • Figure 45: Peak gas demand forecast for Abu Dhabi's power and desalination sector, 2010-20*
  • Figure 46: Abu Dhabi forecast peak gas demand with and without alternative energy, 2010-20
  • Figure 47: Dewa's fuel bill, 2004-08
  • Figure 48: Dubai's targeted sources of generation, 2030 (%)
  • Figure 49: Sonelgaz companies
  • Figure 50: Algerian power supplies by source, 2012 (%)
  • Figure 51: Solar thermal electricity generating potentials in Algeria
  • Figure 52: Algeria annual global horizontal irradiation potential
  • Figure 53: Algeria's contribution of renewable energy to power generation, 2011-30
  • Figure 54: Algeria's renewable and conventional energy mix, 2011-30
  • Figure 55: The Hassi R'Mel ISCC
  • Figure 56: Breakdown of energy consumption by sector, 2011 (%)
  • Figure 57: The power sector's fuel mix, 2010 (%)
  • Figure 58: Projected fuel consumption by the power sector, 2010-30
  • Figure 59: Solar thermal electricity generating potentials in Kuwait
  • Figure 60: Proposed output levels from the Al-Abdaliya ISCC
  • Figure 61: Kahramaa's original planned provisional long-term capacity by source*, 2008-36 (MW)
  • Figure 62: Solar thermal electricity generating potentials in Qatar
  • Figure 63: Solar radiation levels by month in Al-Khor (kWh/m2/d)
  • Figure 64: Electricity sector capital expenditure forecast, 2012-30 ($bn) - require original data
  • Figure 65: Forecast renewable energy generation capacity, 2012-30 - require original data
  • Figure 66: Iraqi renewable energy capacity additions, 2012-15
  • Figure 67: Solar thermal electricity generating potentials in Iraq
  • Figure 68: Annual global horizontal irradiation map of Iraq
  • Figure 69: Iraq planned stage one solar energy sites, March 2013
  • Figure 70: Iraq's planned stage two solar energy projects, March 2013
  • Figure 71: Tunisian power supplies by source, 2011 (GWh)
  • Figure 72: Tunisian domestic power generation capacity by source, 2011 (MW)
  • Figure 73: Renewables targets set out under the Tunisian Solar Plan, 2010-30 (MW)
  • Figure 74: Renewables targets by sector set out under the Tunisian Solar Plan, 2010-30 (MW)
  • Figure 75: Proposed sources of funding for the Tunisian Solar Plan (TDm)
  • Figure 76: Solar thermal electricity generating potentials in Tunisia
  • Figure 77: Libyan power generation capacity by source, 2009
  • Figure 78: Solar thermal electricity generating potentials in Libya
  • Figure 79: Solar thermal electricity generating potentials in Bahrain
  • Figure 80: Annual direct normal irradiance map of Oman
  • Figure 81: Global solar radiation average, 1987-92 (kWh/m2/d)
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