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市場調查報告書

複合材料產業上新的革新

Emerging Innovations in Composites Industry

出版商 Lucintel 商品編碼 325465
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 406 Pages
商品交期: 最快1-2個工作天內
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複合材料產業上新的革新 Emerging Innovations in Composites Industry
出版日期: 2015年03月04日 內容資訊: 英文 406 Pages
簡介

複合材料以具有出色性能證明了其價值,現在要解決用高成本效率的製造方法和製造流程縮短勞動時間的課題。為了解除這些課題的配合措施,出現在先進製造技術和創新材料的發展。今後的複合材料的市場預計競爭激化,有革新力的企業才能生存,獲得市場佔有率。

本報告提供複合材料產業上新的革新趨勢的相關調查、複合材料的革新的必要性和未滿足需求、目前市場規模與成長推進因素、阻礙要素分析、各材料及各用途的技術開發趨勢、市場規模的預測、未來展望等相關彙整。

第1章 摘要整理

第2章 革新概要

  • 革新的必要性
  • 複合材料產業上革新

第3章 複合材料產業相關考察和未滿足需求分析

  • 複合材料製造技術
  • 複合材料市場:材料與用途
    • 複合材料市場:各材料
    • 先進複合材料市場
    • 原材料市場
  • 價值鏈分析
  • 成長的推進因素與課題
    • 複合材料利用的推進因素
    • 近幾年產業上的課題
      • 能源成本的壓迫
      • 玻璃纖維產業課題
      • 比較安泰的樹脂製造商
      • 加工業者的課題
  • 未滿足需求分析
    • 低成本原料的需求
    • 樹脂和纖維材料,具有較高的斷裂應變
    • 更佳的耐UV性、耐化學性材料
    • 大型、小型零件的低成本製造流程
    • 高溫複合材料的需求
    • 低收縮性材料
    • 低消耗性複合材料
    • 減震、耐噪音性材料
    • 對合模最適合的樹脂、添加劑系統
    • 產品的製造能力和實施能力
    • 彈性膠殼
    • 難燃燒材料
    • 自我修復材料
    • 在短處理時間的製造流程
    • 彈性蜂巢芯
    • 布料的起皺
    • 濕預浸料的切削方法
    • 耐濕性蜂巢芯的需求
    • 速硬化性環氧樹脂

第4章 各材料的新革新

  • 玻璃纖維
  • 碳纖維
  • 天然纖維
  • 樹脂
  • 化合物
  • 核心材料

第5章 各用途的新革新

  • 航太
  • 汽車
  • 風力發電
  • 建築
  • 製造技術

第6章 複合材料產業上的革新:未來發展藍圖

第7章 近幾年的市場投入趨勢

  • 玻璃纖維
  • 碳纖維
  • 天然纖維
  • 樹脂
  • 化合物
  • 核心材料
目錄

Composites have already proven their worth as the materials having excellent performance benefits. The current challenges lying ahead are to make them cost-effective and speed up the manufacturing process. The efforts to meet these challenges have resulted in the development of advanced manufacturing techniques and innovative materials. The future market is expected to be highly competitive, and companies with innovation capability can thrive and gain market share.

The market for one of the composite materials, such as glass fiber, which is used as a reinforcing material for a variety of applications, such as boat, construction, wind, pipe and tank, and consumer goods, was approximately $8.1 billion in 2013. Manufacturers of glass fibers are expected to focus on continuously developing high-performance glass fibers to meet higher mechanical and chemical requirements of different applications. Recently, PPG, 3B, Jushi Group, Owens Corning, and others have launched products to meet the requirements of the industry.

Lucintel, a leading global management consulting and market research firm, has analyzed innovations in the global composites market by material, application, and technology and has come up with a comprehensive research report, “Emerging Innovations in Composites Industry”. This report provides an analysis of innovations in composites manufacturing technologies, applications and materials, including the market potential of materials, value chain, key drivers, unmet need, and the future roadmap for innovations in the composites industry. The study also includes the global composites market forecasts through 2025, by application. Innovations in the composites industry are categorized or presented in the report as under the following headings:

Megatrends in composites by:

  • Materials
  • Applications
  • Technology

Innovations in the global composites industry by material:

  • Glass Fiber
  • Carbon Fiber
  • Natural Fiber
  • Resins
  • Compounds
  • Core Materials

Innovations in the global composites industry by application:

  • Aerospace
  • Automotive
  • Wind Energy
  • Construction

On the basis of its comprehensive research, Lucintel expects significant innovations in the composites market in the next 50 years. Most of the innovations in composite materials are focusing on performance improvement and cost benefits.

To make any investment, business or strategic decisions, you need timely and robust market information. This market report fulfills this core need. This is an indispensable reference guide for composite material suppliers, product manufacturers, investors, researchers, engineers, distributors and many more, who are dealing with the composites industry. Some of the features of this market report are:

  • Market size and growth rates of the global composites market. Market for FRP and advanced composites
  • Global composite industry size in terms of value and volume
  • Global composites industry trend (2008-2013) and forecast (2014-2019) in terms of value and volume by region and by application
    • Market size estimates for reinforcements and resins
    • Market breakdown by applications and key regions North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Rest of the World
    • Composites market by countries such as China, India, US, and Germany.
    • Competitive analysis between steel, aluminum, plastics and the composites industry
    • Market breakdown by manufacturing process, by market segments, and by various material types
    • Thermoset and thermoplastic composites market size, trends and forecast
    • Market outlook and global trends in automotive, marine, construction, aerospace and other important market segments with needs and challenges of various market segments
    • Value chain analysis. Dollar and gross profit flow through various nodes of the value chain (from raw material to final application)
    • Material price and property comparison. Fiber and resin price history and forecast. Material prices of more than 100 materials such as fibers, resins, fabrics, prepregs, adhesives, and metals

Table of Contents

1. Executive Summary

2. Innovations Overview

  • 2.1: Why innovation is required
  • 2.2: Innovations in composites industry

3. Composites Industry Insights and Unmet Needs Analysis

  • 3.1: Composites manufacturing technologies
  • 3.2: Composite market- materials and applications
    • 3.2.1: Composites market by material
    • 3.2.2: Advanced composites market
    • 3.2.3: Raw materials market
  • 3.3: Value chain analysis
  • 3.4: Growth drivers and challenges
    • 3.4.1: Driving forces for the use of composite materials
    • 3.4.2: Industry challenges in recent years
      • 3.4.2.1: The energy cost squeeze
      • 3.4.2.2: Challenges for glass fiber industry
      • 3.4.2.3: Resin producers are relatively safe
      • 3.4.2.4: Fabricators' challenge
  • 3.5: Unmet needs analysis
    • 3.5.1: Need for low-cost raw materials
    • 3.5.2: Resins and fiber materials with higher strain to failure
    • 3.5.3: Better UV- and chemical-resistant materials
    • 3.5.4: Low-cost manufacturing process for large and small parts
    • 3.5.5: Need for high temperature composite materials
    • 3.5.6: Low shrinkage materials
    • 3.5.7: Low wear and tear composite materials
    • 3.5.8: Damping and noise resistance materials
    • 3.5.9: Optimal resin and additive systems for closed molding operations
    • 3.5.10: Products manufacturability and affordability
    • 3.5.11: Flexible gel coats
    • 3.5.12: Flame-resistant materials
    • 3.5.13: Self-healing material
    • 3.5.14: Manufacturing process with lower processing time
    • 3.5.15: Flexible honeycomb core
    • 3.5.16: Fabric wrinkling
    • 3.5.17: Method of cutting wet prepregs
    • 3.5.18: Need for moisture-resistant honeycomb core
    • 3.5.19: Fast cure epoxy resin

4. Emerging Innovations in Composite Materials

  • 4.1: Innovations in glass fiber
  • 4.2: Innovations in carbon fiber
  • 4.3: Innovations in natural fiber
  • 4.4: Innovations in resins
  • 4.5: Innovations in compounds
  • 4.6: Innovations in core materials

5. Emerging Innovations in Composites Applications

  • 5.1: Emerging innovations in aerospace market
  • 5.2: Emerging innovations in automotive market
  • 5.3: Emerging innovations in wind energy market
  • 5.4: Emerging innovations in construction market
  • 5.5: Emerging innovations in composites manufacturing technologies

6. Future Roadmap for Innovations in Composites Industry

7. Other Recent Launches

  • 7.1: Glass fiber
  • 7.2: Carbon fiber
  • 7.3: Natural fiber
  • 7.4: Resin
  • 7.5: Compounds
  • 7.6: Core materials

List of Figures

Chapter 2.Innovations Overview

  • Figure 2.1: Six aspects of business values created by innovation
  • Figure 2.2: Unmet needs and the scope of innovation

Chapter 3.Composites Industry Insights and Unmet Needs Analysis

  • Figure 3.1: Classification of composite processing techniques
  • Figure 3.2: Advanced composites market share in global composites industry in 2013
  • Figure 3.3: Advanced composites market size (Million Pounds) in global composites industry in 2013
  • Figure 3.4: Advanced composites market distribution ($M) in global composites industry in 2013
  • Figure 3.5: Advanced composites market size ($M) in global composites industry in 2013
  • Figure 3.6: Raw material shipment (Million Pounds) in global composites industry in 2013
  • Figure 3.7: Global composites market breakdown (%) by raw materials used in 2013
  • Figure 3.8: Raw material shipment ($M) in global composites industry in 2013
  • Figure 3.9: Global composites market breakdown (%, $M) by raw materials used in 2013
  • Figure 3.10: Composites industry value chain
  • Figure 3.11: Flow chart of value chain for the composites industry
  • Figure 3.12: Dollar ($) and gross profit flow chart through various nodes of the value chain (from raw material to end product)
  • Figure 3.13: Supply chain of composites industry

Chapter 4.Emerging Innovations in Composite Materials

  • Figure 4.1: Single-end roving
  • Figure 4.2: Multi-end roving
  • Figure 4.3: Chopped strand mat
  • Figure 4.4: Veil mat
  • Figure 4.5: Chopped strand
  • Figure 4.6: Fabrics
  • Figure 4.7: Woven roving
  • Figure 4.8: Recent glass fiber product launches towards high strength
  • Figure 4.9: Recent glass fiber product launches towards high modulus
  • Figure 4.10: Fiber glass direct roving from Johns Manville
  • Figure 4.11: 248A and PerforMax 249A short fiber application parts
  • Figure 4.12: Chopped strand reinforcements
  • Figure 4.13: Glass fiber products from AGY
  • Figure 4.14: Type 30™ SE2307 single-end roving from Owens Corning
  • Figure 4.15: Recently launched glass fiber products by Owens Corning for automotive
  • Figure 4.16: Recently launched glass fiber products by Owens Corning for wind energy
  • Figure 4.17: Recently launched glass fiber products by Owens Corning for construction and others
  • Figure 4.18: Some of the other glass fiber product launches (I)
  • Figure 4.19: Some of the other glass fiber product launches (II)
  • Figure 4.20: Some of the other glass fiber product launches for application (I)
  • Figure 4.21: Some of the other glass fiber product launches for application (II)
  • Figure 4.22: Different types of carbon fiber forms
  • Figure 4.23: Typical continuous carbon fiber
  • Figure 4.24: Typical chopped carbon fiber
  • Figure 4.25: Typical metal (nickel)-coated carbon fiber
  • Figure 4.26: Recent carbon fiber product launches directed towards high strength
  • Figure 4.27: Tensile modulus of a few carbon fiber products launched since last five years
  • Figure 4.28: Carbon fiber structure
  • Figure 4.29: C-PLY ™ SPREAD from Chomarat
  • Figure 4.30: DIALEAD K13916 from Mitsubishi Plastics, Inc.
  • Figure 4.31: Some of the major carbon fiber product launches in automotive application
  • Figure 4.32: Some of the major carbon fiber product launches in automotive and aerospace application
  • Figure 4.33: Future innovations towards improving tensile strength in natural fibers
  • Figure 4.34: Tensile strength of natural fiber products launched during 2009-2012
  • Figure 4.35: Future innovations to improve strength-to-stiffness ratio in natural fiber
  • Figure 4.36: Areas of innovation in natural fibers
  • Figure 4.37: Recent launches of continuous natural fibers and their properties
  • Figure 4.38: AmpliTex light fabric properties and their markets
  • Figure 4.39: Expected increase in usage of natural fibers in pultrusion and filament winding processes in future
  • Figure 4.40: Natural fiber treatments methods
  • Figure 4.41: Study of viscosity of recently launched resins suggest more launches in low viscosity resins during last six years
  • Figure 4.42: Dow VORAFORCETM 5300 epoxy resin from The Dow Chemical Company
  • Figure 4.43: Beyone™ 1 resin for wind composites applications from DSM
  • Figure 4.44: Part developed with carbon fiber and epoxy resin
  • Figure 4.45: Profile and structure
  • Figure 4.46: EPIKOTE MGS RIMR 145 resin for wind turbine blade application from Momentive Performance Materials Inc
  • Figure 4.47: Some of the other resin product launches (I)
  • Figure 4.48: Some of the other resin product launches (II)
  • Figure 4.49: Some of the resin product launches for applications (I)
  • Figure 4.50: Some of the resin product launches for applications (II)
  • Figure 4.51: Short fiber, long fiber, and continuous fiber
  • Figure 4.52: Classification of thermoplastic composite materials
  • Figure 4.53: Sheet molding compound from core molding technologies
  • Figure 4.54: SymTerra sheet molding compounds (SMC) that combine renewable-resource raw materials
  • Figure 4.55: Hyperion air handler made of SMC from CSP
  • Figure 4.56: The “Canopy LENS Antenna” uses molded BMC IB-2240 for its frontal enclosure
  • Figure 4.57: LFT pellets
  • Figure 4.58: Some of the major compound materials product launches
  • Figure 4.59: Use of core materials in wind blade
  • Figure 4.60: Study of strength property for recent product launches in core materials
  • Figure 4.61: More core material product launches are concentrated in low density area
  • Figure 4.62: SAER foam from SAERTEX
  • Figure 4.63: ArmaFORM PET foam from Armacell
  • Figure 4.64: BALTEK® Banova lightweight panel from 3A Composites
  • Figure 4.65: ROHACELL®, PMI-based structural foam from Evonik
  • Figure 4.66: DOW Wind Energy
  • Figure 4.67: Some other major product launches of core materials (I)
  • Figure 4.68: Some other major product launches of core materials (II)
  • Figure 4.69: Some other major product launches of core materials (III)
  • Figure 4.70: Some other major product launches of core materials (IV)
  • Figure 4.71: Some other major product launches of core materials (V)

Chapter 5.Emerging Innovations in Composites Applications

  • Figure 5.1: Forecast of buy material market in global aerospace and defense industry in B lbs. 2013-2025
  • Figure 5.2: Material dominance in aerospace industry
  • Figure 5.3: Composites usage in different Boeing models
  • Figure 5.4: Trends in materials usage
  • Figure 5.5: Aerospace market need and areas of innovation
  • Figure 5.6: Boeing's B787 improvements over B767
  • Figure 5.7: Aerospace industry expectations from composites
  • Figure 5.8: Aerospace industry trends
  • Figure 5.9: Increased usage of carbon composites in primary structures
  • Figure 5.10: Increasing composites usage in all current and future leading programs
  • Figure 5.11: Genx CFRP front fan blades and front fan case
  • Figure 5.12: Current innovations to meet aerospace industry expectations
  • Figure 5.13: Lockheed martin incorporated CNRP into F35 lightning II wingtip fairings resulting in significant cost and weight reduction
  • Figure 5.14: Aerospace programs using automated material laying up techniques
  • Figure 5.15: Composites industry is shifting towards AFP and ATL processes
  • Figure 5.16: MAG's Gemini (combing AFP and ATL together)
  • Figure 5.17: GroFi platform- Multi-Lay-Up approach
  • Figure 5.18: Increasing focus towards Out-of-Autoclave
  • Figure 5.19: Boeing's different aircraft depicting reduced parts count
  • Figure 5.20: One piece fuselage of Boeing and HondaJet
  • Figure 5.21: Carbon fiber recycling as the innovation trend towards sustainability
  • Figure 5.22: Increasing need for recyclability of aircraft materials
  • Figure 5.23: Boeing's CFRP recycling
  • Figure 5.24: Forecast of buy materials market in automotive industry in million pounds and material dominance in automotive industry
  • Figure 5.25: Automotive industry expectation from composites
  • Figure 5.26: Manufacturing expectation - low-cost precursor and processes for carbon fiber
  • Figure 5.27: Industry putting efforts on alternative precursors and improvization in manufacturing process to reach desired level of $5-$6/lbs
  • Figure 5.28: Manufacturing expectation - improvization of part manufacturing process cycle time
  • Figure 5.29: Improvization in part manufacturing processes cycle time
  • Figure 5.30: HP RTM in mass produced vehicles
  • Figure 5.31: HP RTM process steps in detail
  • Figure 5.32: Partners of HP RTM process and fabricators using this process
  • Figure 5.33: Lamborghini - Callaway forged composites
  • Figure 5.34: Forged composite and RTM costs overview
  • Figure 5.35: Forged composite production rate improvements
  • Figure 5.36: Gurit SPRINT CBS
  • Figure 5.37: Comparison of vacuum bag process and press molding process cycle time
  • Figure 5.38: Electric vehicle made from Toho Tenax Technology
  • Figure 5.39: Manufacturing expectation - part consolidation or one piece design
  • Figure 5.40: Part Consolidation - one piece Monocoque
  • Figure 5.41: Few examples of one piece design
  • Figure 5.42: Monolithic design concept, a composites car door
  • Figure 5.43: Sustainability - recyclability of carbon composites
  • Figure 5.44: Recyclable CFRP composites in BMW I3
  • Figure 5.45: BMW's CFRP recycling technology
  • Figure 5.46: Sustainability - usage of natural fiber composites
  • Figure 5.47: Natural fiber composites in BMW I3
  • Figure 5.48: Cost reduction - inline compounding
  • Figure 5.49: Inline compounding system, such as D-LFT, D-GMT, and D-SMC
  • Figure 5.50: Forecast of buy materials market in wind energy industry in M lbs and material dominance in wind energy industry
  • Figure 5.51: Wind energy industry expectations from composites
  • Figure 5.52: Manufacturing expectation (wind energy) - increased usage of carbon fiber
  • Figure 5.53: Increasing demand of weight reduction in longer wind blades is leading to increased usage of carbon fiber
  • Figure 5.54: Industry focusing on higher MW size turbines and incorporating carbon fiber for reducing blade weight and increasing energy output
  • Figure 5.55: Manufacturing expectation (wind energy) - monolithic design
  • Figure 5.56: Monolithic design -- Siemens B75 - world's largest fiberglass component cast in one piece
  • Figure 5.57: Manufacturing expectation (wind energy) - seamless modular technology
  • Figure 5.58: Modular design -- blade dynamics using patented seamless modular technology for ETI's* project of developing world's largest blades
  • Figure 5.59: Blade dynamics' D49 rotor blades for onshore using seamless modular technology
  • Figure 5.60: Manufacturing expectation (wind energy) - Fibramatic automated lay-up process
  • Figure 5.61: Automated manufacturing process Gamesa's Fibramatic automated lay-up for 100% automated infusion wind blade
  • Figure 5.62: Construction industry expectations from composites
  • Figure 5.63: Manufacturing expectation (construction industry) - increasing usage of polyurethane urethane composites
  • Figure 5.64: Increasing usage of polyurethane urethane composites
  • Figure 5.65: Manufacturing expectation (construction industry) - use of FRP in waterless toilet system
  • Figure 5.66: Use of FRP in waterless toilet system
  • Figure 5.67: Sustainability (construction industry) - usage of natural fiber composites
  • Figure 5.68: Use of natural fiber composites in construction
  • Figure 5.69: Sustainability (construction industry) - reduce greenhouse gas emission
  • Figure 5.70: Need to reduce greenhouse gas emission
  • Figure 5.71: Major emerging trends in composites technologies

Chapter 6.Future Roadmap for Innovations in Composites Industry

  • Figure 6.1: Innovation megatrends in composites market
  • Figure 6.2: Megatrend towards achieving light-weighting
  • Figure 6.3: Future direction towards improving performance
  • Figure 6.4: Innovations directed towards price reduction
  • Figure 6.5: Increasing use of eco-friendly materials
  • Figure 6.6: Emergence of monolithic design

List of Tables

Chapter 2.Innovations Overview

  • Table 2.1: Key Emerging Innovations in Composite Materials

Chapter 3.Composites Industry Insights and Unmet Needs Analysis

  • Table 3.1: Global composites shipment by raw material type in 2013 (Source: Lucintel)
  • Table 3.2: Impact properties of some selected materials (I)
  • Table 3.3: Impact properties of some selected materials (II)
  • Table 3.4: Maximum continuous use temperatures for various thermoset and thermoplastics

Chapter 4.Emerging Innovations in Composite Materials

  • Table 4.1: Lucintel's rating methodology
  • Table 4.2: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of new glass fiber technology from Johns Manville
  • Table 4.3: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of ME1510 EP multi-end roving from Owens Corning
  • Table 4.4: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating fiber glass roving from Owens Corning
  • Table 4.5: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of S-3 UHM™ glass fiber from AGY
  • Table 4.6: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of type 30™ SE2307 single-end roving from Owens Corning
  • Table 4.7: Some more emerging innovations in glass fiber in 2014.
  • Table 4.8: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of CFRP lasso from Nanjing Loyalty Composite Equipment Manufacture Co. Ltd.
  • Table 4.9: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of C-PLY ™ SPREAD from Chomarat
  • Table 4.10: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of DIALEAD K13916 from Mitsubishi Plastics, Inc
  • Table 4.11: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of Dow VORAFORCETM 5300 Epoxy resin from The Dow Chemical Company
  • Table 4.12: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of Beyone™ 1 resin for wind composites applications from DSM
  • Table 4.13: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of EPIKOTE™ resin 05475 and EPIKURE™ curing agent 05500 system from Momentive Specialty Chemicals
  • Table 4.14: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of Daron 220 resin from DSM
  • Table 4.15: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of EPIKOTE MGS RIMR 145 resin for wind turbine blade application from Momentive Performance Materials Inc.
  • Table 4.16: Some more emerging innovations in resin in 2014
  • Table 4.17: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of sheet molding compound from Core Molding Technologies
  • Table 4.18: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of SymTerra® composites from Premix
  • Table 4.19: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of Hyperion air handler made of SMC from CSP
  • Table 4.20: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of canopy LENS antenna molded with BMC IB-2240
  • Table 4.21: Lucintel's innovation attractiveness rating of a non-halogenated FR LFT-PP compound ECO-FORTE(TM) from RESIN (Products & Technology) B.V
  • Table 4.22: Some More Emerging Innovations in Compound in 2014
  • Table 4.23: Lucintel's Innovation Attractiveness Rating of SAER Foam from SAERTEX
  • Table 4.24: Lucintel's Innovation Attractiveness Rating of ArmaFORM PET Foam from Armacell
  • Table 4.25: Lucintel's Innovation Attractiveness Rating of BALTEK® Banova Lightweight Panel from 3A Composites
  • Table 4.26: Lucintel's Innovation Attractiveness Rating of ROHACELL®, PMI-Based Structural Foam from Evonik
  • Table 4.28: Lucintel's Innovation Attractiveness Rating of DOW COMPAXX™ 900 Foam Core System from Dow

Chapter 5.Emerging Innovations in Composites Applications

  • Table 5.1: Some emerging innovations in aerospace & defense in 2014
  • Table 5.2: Increasing usage of natural fiber composites applications
  • Table 5.3: Some emerging innovations in automotive in 2014
  • Table 5.4: Some emerging innovations in wind energy in 2014
  • Table 5.5: Some emerging innovations in construction in 2014
  • Table 5.6: Some emerging innovations in other industry in 2014
  • Table 5.7: Some emerging technological innovations in 2014
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