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市場調查報告書

穿戴式感測器:市場預測、技術、企業

Wearable Sensors 2018-2028: Technologies, Markets & Players

出版商 IDTechEx Ltd. 商品編碼 325553
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 292 Slides
商品交期: 最快1-2個工作天內
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穿戴式感測器:市場預測、技術、企業 Wearable Sensors 2018-2028: Technologies, Markets & Players
出版日期: 2017年09月19日 內容資訊: 英文 292 Slides
簡介

穿戴式感測器的市場規模預計至2025年達到30億美元,其30%為剛開始出現的新類型感測器。感測器與新的能源採集、儲存技術,有效率的電源管理系統,及低電力運算一同組合,成為更有彈性、時髦、隱形的尺寸規格,穿戴式技術市場到2025年預計推升至700億美元。

本報告提供現在穿戴式技術產品上主導的感測器的種類,及未來預計主導的新感測器種類相關詳細調查、各市場區隔分析、應用的實例,及主要企業簡介等彙整,為您概述為以下內容。

第1章 摘要整理、結論

第2章 市場預測

  • 範圍、定義
  • 穿戴式技術的感測器市場規模
  • 預測:感各測器分類

第3章 慣性測量設備 (IMU)

  • MEMS(微機電系統)的簡介
  • 加速計
  • 陀螺儀
  • 磁儀表
  • 壓力感應器
  • 家電的IMU趨勢
  • IMU:僅管有幾個限制仍普及

第4章 伸縮、壓力及衝擊感測器

  • 抵抗力
  • 容量性壓力感應器
  • 壓力感應器的其他類型

第5章 身體的電器測量

  • 生物電位的測量
  • 電極特性
  • 生物電阻
  • 案例研究:生物電阻感測器的可能性的行銷
  • 胃的電解質
  • 穿戴式電極播放器

第6章 光動作感測器

  • 醫療用途:光學心律監測
  • 資訊娛樂用途:附相機動態捕捉
  • 穿戴式相機

第7章 化學感測器

  • 化學感測器的工作法
  • 檢體來源的選擇
  • 案例研究:血糖監測系統及糖尿病治療
  • 其他檢體化學感測器的登場

第8章 氣體感測器:化學感測器的擴張

  • 氣體感測器的種類
  • 固體電解質的全印刷氣體感測器
  • 氣體感測器的新穿戴式應用

第9章 其他穿戴式感測器

  • 氣溫
  • 聲音

第10章 感測器融合:應用實例

  • 巨大的感測器融合的機會
  • 應用的案例研究:頭部衝擊感測器
  • 應用的案例研究:老年人的照護,及廣泛的物聯網的整合

第11章 企業簡介

  • 企業採訪
    • Johnson & Johnson Innovations
    • Medtronic
  • 詳細的企業簡介
    • BeBop Sensors
    • CETEMMSA
    • Clothing+
    • Imec
    • Electrozyme
    • Ohmatex
    • Proteus Digital Health
    • PST Sensors
    • Sensoria
    • Stretchsense
    • Thalmic Labs
    • Vivalnk

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目錄

IDTechEx's report on wearable sensors offers a thorough characterisation and outlook for each type of sensor used in wearable products, both today and in the future. The report has been compiled over three years of research, leveraging IDTechEx's expertise in areas such as wearable technology, sensors, IoT, energy storage & harvesting and materials. The report covers 21 different types of sensor, across 9 groups, characterising the technology, applications and industry landscape for this. The report describes the activity of over 115 companies, including primary content (e.g. interviews, photographs, visits, etc.) with more than 80 key players in the industry. Finally, the report provides detailed quantitative market forecasts for each type of wearable sensor, leveraging unique primary data from interviews, collated financial statistics and industry trends alongside IDTechEx's parallel forecasting for 42 different wearable technology product types.

As many wearable technology products rise and fall through the hype curve, companies are consolidating around the aspects of wearable products that add the most value. In many cases, these value propositions come from the sensor data. Fitness tracking and smartwatches have been built around biometric and activity data. Virtual, augmented and mixed reality devices rely on a suite of sensors including combinations of cameras, inertial measurement units, depth sensing, force/pressure sensors and more to enable the user to interact with the content and the environment. Medical devices often exist to directly monitor and interact with processes in the body. Other areas such as military products, PPE, enterprise systems and more are no different.

In all, IDTechEx's Wearable Technology research tracks over 42 different wearable product types. This extensive work over many years has been leveraged to provide forecasts in volume, price and revenue for 21 types of wearable sensors, across 9 product groups, with the split between revenue in 2022 as shown:

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IDTechEx describes wearable sensors in three waves. The first wave includes sensors that have been incorporated in wearables for many years, often being originally developed for wearable products decades ago, and existing as mature industries today. A second wave of wearable sensors came following huge technology investment in smartphones. Many of the sensors from smartphones could be easily adapted for use in wearable products; they could be made-wearable. Finally, as wearable technology hype and investment peaked, many organisations identified many sensor types that could be developed specifically with wearable products in mind. These made-for-wearable sensors often remain in the commercial evaluation or relatively early commercial sales today, but some examples are already becoming significant success stories.

Billions of wearable electronic products are already sold each year today. Many have already experienced significant hardware commoditisation, with tough competition driving prices down. Even as wearable devices become more advanced, introducing more sensors and better components to enhance value propositions, lessons of history tell us that hardware will always be prone to commoditisation. As this happens the role of sensors only becomes more important; with hardware prices being constantly squeezed, increasing proportions of the value that companies can capture from products will be from the data that the products can generate. The key hardware component for capturing this data is the sensors, so understanding the development and prospects of sensors today is critical to predicting the potential for this entire industry in the future. Wearable Sensors 2018-2028 is written to to address the needs of any company or individual looking to gain a clear, independent perspective on the outlook for various types of wearable sensor. The report answers detailed questions about technology, markets and industry trends, and supported by years of primary research investment collated and distilled within.

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Table of Contents

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  • 1.1. Introduction to wearable sensors
  • 1.2. Sensors enable key product value propositions
  • 1.3. 9 major wearable sensor categories (by function)
  • 1.4. 21 types of wearable sensor used today
  • 1.5. Wearable sensors in three waves
    • 1.5.1. The first wave: "The originals"
    • 1.5.2. The second wave: "Made-wearable" sensors
    • 1.5.3. The third wave: "Made-for-wearable" sensors
  • 1.6. Market forecast 2018 - 2028: Wearable sensors (Volume)
  • 1.7. Companies mentioned in this report

2. INTRODUCTION

  • 2.1. Wearables 2014-2016: potential, growth and hype
  • 2.2. Illustrating the fading hype for wearables today
  • 2.3. Metrics for hype: Google trends
    • 2.3.1. Metrics for hype: Funding and M&A
    • 2.3.2. Metrics for hype: Patent trends
  • 2.4. Wearables 2016-2018: Commoditisation, shakeout, maturity
  • 2.5. Wearables as a sum of it's parts
  • 2.6. Wearables 2018-onwards: core value shines through
  • 2.7. Sensors enable key product value propositions
  • 2.8. Definitions
  • 2.9. Common wearable sensors deployed today
  • 2.10. Sensors on the body: what do we want to measure?
  • 2.11. Appropriate data for the desired outcome
    • 2.11.1. Appropriate data: Example
    • 2.11.2. Example: effort and reward in heart monitoring
    • 2.11.3. Example: Useful data at different levels of inference
  • 2.12. Sensor fusion is essential and expected
    • 2.12.1. Sensor fusion is essential and expected
  • 2.13. Different product types from the same sensors
  • 2.14. Wider industry context for each sensor type
  • 2.15. Wearable sensors in three waves

3. SENSOR TYPES FOR WEARABLE PRODUCTS

  • 3.1. Contents

4. INERTIAL MEASUREMENT UNITS (IMUS)

  • 4.1. IMUs - Introduction
  • 4.2. MEMS - Background
  • 4.3. MEMS - Manufacturing techniques
  • 4.4. MEMS - Becoming a commodity
  • 4.5. MEMS Accelerometers
  • 4.6. MEMS Gyroscopes
  • 4.7. Overcoming power consumption challenges with gyroscopes
  • 4.8. Digital compasses
  • 4.9. Magnetometer types
  • 4.10. Magnetometer suppliers and industry dynamic
    • 4.10.1. Magnetometer suppliers by type
  • 4.11. MEMS Barometers
  • 4.12. Pressure sensors in wearable devices
    • 4.12.1. Example: Interview with Bosch Sensortec
  • 4.13. Limitations and common errors with MEMS sensors
  • 4.14. MEMS manufacturers: characteristics and examples
  • 4.15. Case study: ST Microelectronics
    • 4.15.1. Case study: Invensense
    • 4.15.2. Apple: iPhone sensor choice case study
  • 4.16. Conclusion: IMUs are here to stay, with some limitations

5. OPTICAL SENSORS

  • 5.1. Optical sensors - introduction

6. OPTICAL SENSORS - HRM

  • 6.1. Photoplethysmography (PPG)
  • 6.2. Transmission-mode PPG
  • 6.3. Reflectance-mode PPG
  • 6.4. Reflectance-mode PPG for fitness wearables
  • 6.5. Key players for OHRM in fitness wearables
  • 6.6. The ear as an optimal sensing location: "Hearables"
  • 6.7. Example: Valencell
    • 6.7.1. Example: "Circumission" PPG from Cosinuss
    • 6.7.2. Examples: APM Korea
    • 6.7.3. Example: ActiveHearts™ by WBD101 in the Actywell One

7. OPTICAL SENSORS - VISION & DEPTH

  • 7.1. 3D imaging and motion capture
  • 7.2. Application example: Motion capture in animation
  • 7.3. Stereoscopic vision
  • 7.4. Time of flight
  • 7.5. Structured light
  • 7.6. Comparison of 3D imaging technologies
  • 7.7. Example: Leap Motion
    • 7.7.1. Example: Microsoft; from Kinect to Hololens
    • 7.7.2. Example: Intel's RealSense™
    • 7.7.3. Example: Occipital
  • 7.8. Commercial 3D camera examples

8. WEARABLE CAMERAS

  • 8.1. Cameras in wearable devices
  • 8.2. Established players exploiting profitable
  • 8.3. Applications in safety and security
  • 8.4. Other applications: Enhancing sports media
  • 8.5. Cameras in smartwatches?
  • 8.6. Social applications: drivers and challenges
  • 8.7. Example: Spectacles by Snap Inc.
  • 8.8. Other applications: Automatic digital diary

9. OPTICAL SENSORS - OTHER EXAMPLES

  • 9.1. Optical chemical sensors
  • 9.2. Implantable optical glucose sensors
  • 9.3. Optical method for non-invasive glucose sensing
  • 9.4. Start-up example: eLutions
  • 9.5. Related platform: UV exposure indicators
  • 9.6. Speech recognition using lasers - VocalZoom

10. ELECTRODES

  • 10.1. Electrodes: Introduction

11. ELECTRODES - BIOPOTENTIAL

  • 11.1. Measuring biopotential
  • 11.2. ECG
  • 11.3. EEG
  • 11.4. EMG
  • 11.5. Circuit construction for measuring biopotential
  • 11.6. Circuit construction for measuring biopotential (cont.)
  • 11.7. Properties of wearable electrodes
  • 11.8. Dry electrodes: Challenges and solutions
  • 11.9. Established wearable product types: Chest strap HRM
  • 11.10. HRM in apparel and skin patches
  • 11.11. Consumer EMG products and prototypes
  • 11.12. Consumer EEG products and prototypes
  • 11.13. Approaches for improving wearable electrode performance
  • 11.14. Performance through design: Thalmic Labs
  • 11.15. Performance through design: Samsung
  • 11.16. Electrode ink innovation: Gunma University, Japan
  • 11.17. Electronic tattoos: Seoul National University
  • 11.18. Electronic tattoos: Seoul National University
  • 11.19. Examples: IMEC and the Holst Centre
  • 11.19.1. Examples: Conscious Labs
  • 11.19.2. Example: Freer Logic LLC

12. ELECTRODES - BIOIMPEDANCE

  • 12.1. Measuring bioimpedance
  • 12.2. Galvanic skin response
  • 12.3. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA)
  • 12.4. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA)
  • 12.5. Example: Inbody
  • 12.6. Case study: marketing the potential of bioimpedance
  • 12.7. Case study: marketing the potential of bioimpedance

13. ELECTRODES - OTHER EXAMPLES

  • 13.1. Gastric electrolyte
  • 13.2. Example: Proteus Digital Health
    • 13.2.1. Example: Proteus Digital Health

14. FORCE / PRESSURE / STRETCH SENSORS

  • 14.1. Different modes for sensing motion
  • 14.2. Resistive force sensors
  • 14.3. Players and industry dynamic
  • 14.4. Quantum tunnelling composite: QTC®
  • 14.5. QTC® vs. FSR™ vs. piezoresistor?
  • 14.6. Capacitive pressure sensors
  • 14.7. How they work
  • 14.8. Dielectric elastomer electroactive polymers (DE EAPs)
  • 14.9. Commercialisation of DE EAPs
  • 14.10. Key players in DE EAP commercialisation today
    • 14.10.1. Players with EAPs: Parker Hannifin
    • 14.10.2. Players with EAPs: Stretchsense
    • 14.10.3. Players with EAPs: Bando Chemical
  • 14.11. Textile-based pressure sensing
  • 14.12. Knitting as a route to textile sensors
    • 14.12.1. Example: Knitted conductors by Gunze, Japan
  • 14.13. Early examples of wearable textile FSRs: socks
    • 14.13.1. Examples: BeBop Sensors
    • 14.13.2. Examples: Sensoria
    • 14.13.3. Examples: Sensing Tex
    • 14.13.4. Examples: Vista Medical
    • 14.13.5. Examples: Yamaha and Kureha
    • 14.14. Other examples: Polymatech
  • 14.14.1. Other examples: InnovationLab
    • 14.14.2. Other examples: Tacterion
  • 14.15. Research with emerging advanced materials
  • 14.16. Academic examples: Stanford University
    • 14.16.1. Academic examples: UNIST, Korea
    • 14.16.2. Academic examples: Bio-integrated electronics for cardiac therapy
    • 14.16.3. Academic examples: Instrumented surgical catheters using electronics on balloons
  • 14.17. Other novel types of pressure sensor

15. TEMPERATURE SENSORS

  • 15.1. Two main roles for temperature sensors in wearables
  • 15.2. Types of temperature sensor
  • 15.3. Approaches and standards for medical sensors
  • 15.3.1. Examples: Blue Spark
  • 15.4. Core body temperature
  • 15.5. Ear-based core body temperature measurements
  • 15.6. Measuring core body temperature: new approaches
  • 15.7. Measuring core body temperature: new approaches
  • 15.8. Temperature sensor deployment and suppliers

16. MICROPHONES

  • 16.1. Using sound to investigate the body
  • 16.2. Types of microphones
    • 16.2.1. Example: MEMS microphones
  • 16.3. The need for waterproof, breathable encapsulation
    • 16.3.1. Example: Electret microphones
  • 16.4. Bioacoustics
  • 16.5. Bioacoustics using IMUs
  • 16.6. Microphones and AI for respiratory diagnostics
  • 16.7. Microphones in social and clinical trials

17. CHEMICAL SENSORS

  • 17.1. Introduction
  • 17.2. Selectivity and signal transduction in chemical sensors
  • 17.3. Selectivity and signal transduction in chemical sensors
  • 17.4. Analyte selection and availability
  • 17.5. Analyte selection: Reliability vs practicality vs relevance
  • 17.6. Time dependence
    • 17.6.1. Example: Analytes in the sweat
  • 17.7. Use of nanomaterials to enhance chemical sensors
    • 17.7.1. Example: Graphene and carbon nanotubes
    • 17.7.2. Example: Nanostructured copper
  • 17.8. Optical chemical sensors
  • 17.9. Diagnostics with chemical sensors
  • 17.10. Monitoring blood cholesterol using biosensors
  • 17.11. Towards wearable cholesterol monitoring
  • 17.12. Increasingly portable diagnosis of bovine and human TB
  • 17.13. Wearable diagnostic tests for cystic fibrosis
  • 17.14. Other applications for wearable chemical sensors
    • 17.14.1. Example: sweat alcohol detection
  • 17.15. Case study: Wearable diabetes monitoring
    • 17.15.1. Anatomy of a CGM sensor
    • 17.15.2. Continuous vs Flash glucose monitoring
    • 17.15.3. Abbott Libre
    • 17.15.4. Abbott Libre glucose detection mechanism
    • 17.15.5. Dexcom
    • 17.15.6. Dexcom glucose monitoring mechanism
    • 17.15.7. Medtronic
    • 17.15.8. A new generation of glucose monitoring watches
    • 17.15.9. Comparison of wearable/implanted glucose sensors
    • 17.15.10. The potential for non-invasive testing
    • 17.15.11. Google contact lens- an eye on glucose monitoring
    • 17.15.12. Problems with a glucose contact lens
    • 17.15.13. Non-invasive glucose monitoring- A first device to market
    • 17.15.14. Single use vs ambulatory monitoring: future directions
    • 17.15.15. The future for glucose test strips
    • 17.15.16. Advanced glucose monitoring leads to an artificial pancreas
  • 17.16. Measuring lactic acid
    • 17.16.1. Lactic acid monitoring for athletes
    • 17.16.2. Traditional lactic acid monitors
    • 17.16.3. Microneedles to analyse lactic acid in interstitial fluid
  • 17.17. Examples of players developing wearable chemical sensors
    • 17.17.1. Example: Kenzen

18. GAS SENSORS

  • 18.1. Introduction: Wearable gas sensors
  • 18.2. Concentrations of detectable atmospheric pollutants
  • 18.3. Five common detection principles for gas sensors
  • 18.4. Technology requirements for wearable gas sensors
  • 18.5. Introduction to Metal Oxide (MOS) gas sensors
  • 18.6. Introduction to electrochemical gas sensors
  • 18.7. Transition to new manufacturing methods
  • 18.8. Current research in gas sensors: Carbon Nanotubes
  • 18.9. Current research in gas sensors: Zeolites
  • 18.10. Current research in gas sensors: Graphene
  • 18.11. Future opportunities with wearable gas sensors

19. GPS

  • 19.1. Prominent wearable GPS devices
  • 19.2. Challenges with GPS power consumption

20. APPLICATION AND COMPANY CASE STUDIES

  • 20.1. Environmental gas sensors integration in wristwear
  • 20.2. HiCling
  • 20.3. Gameen Intel
  • 20.4. Wearable Sensors As Part Of Modular Wrist Straps
  • 20.5. TZOA
  • 20.6. Plume labs
  • 20.7. Drayson Technology
  • 20.8. Environmental sensor integration in fashion accessories

21. MARKET FORECASTS

  • 21.1. Forecasting: Introduction and definitions
  • 21.2. 2015-2017: Historical data
  • 21.3. Market forecast 2018 - 2028: Wearable sensors (Volume)
  • 21.4. Table of data (all sensors, volume)
  • 21.5. Market forecast 2018 - 2028: Wearable sensors (Revenue)
  • 21.6. Table of data (all sensors, revenue)
  • 21.7. Sensors in wearable sports and fitness tracking devices
  • 21.8. Trends in the broader device ecosystem for personal tracking
  • 21.9. Sensors in wearable sports & fitness devices: Volume
  • 21.10. Table of data (sports & fitness, volume)
  • 21.11. Sensors in wearable sports & fitness devices: Revenue
  • 21.12. Table of data (sports & fitness, revenue)
  • 21.13. Sensors in wearable medical devices
  • 21.14. Sensors in wearable medical devices: Volumes
  • 21.15. Table of data (medical devices, volume)
  • 21.16. Sensors in wearable medical devices: Revenue
  • 21.17. Table of data (medical devices, revenue)
  • 21.18. Sensors in AR / VR / MR / XR devices
  • 21.19. Sensors in AR / VR / MR / XR devices: Volumes
  • 21.20. Table of data (AR, VR, MR, XR, volume)
  • 21.21. Sensors in AR / VR / MR / XR devices: Revenue
  • 21.22. Table of data (AR, VR, MR, XR, revenue)
  • 21.23. Sensors in wearable industrial & military products
  • 21.24. Sensors in military & industrial wearables: Volumes
  • 21.25. Table of data (industrial & military, volume)
  • 21.26. Sensors in military & industrial wearables: Revenue
  • 21.27. Table of data (industrial & military, revenue)
  • 21.28. Wearable gas sensors: Volume
  • 21.29. Wearable gas sensors: Revenue
  • 21.30. Table of data (gas sensors, volume & revenue)
  • 21.31. Table of data (sensor types and pricing)
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