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市場調查報告書

LTE vs. 光纖:SFB時代的FMC (固定網和移動網的匯流)

LTE vs. Fibre: Fixed-Mobile Convergence in the SFB Era

出版商 IDATE DigiWorld 商品編碼 347857
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 48 Pages
商品交期: 最快1-2個工作天內
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LTE vs. 光纖:SFB時代的FMC (固定網和移動網的匯流) LTE vs. Fibre: Fixed-Mobile Convergence in the SFB Era
出版日期: 2015年12月18日 內容資訊: 英文 48 Pages
簡介

固定存取及行動存取市場雙方的趨勢之一,是速度的增加,尤其是超高速存取 (30Mbps以上) 的轉變。

本報告提供固定、行動網路預測及對業者來說的系統整合的機會調查。

第1章 摘要整理

第2章 調查手法、定義

第3章 固定、行動網路:現狀

  • 固定光纖網路的發展
  • 光纖由於FTTH/FTTB架構而用戶劇增
  • 混合光纖/電纜FTTX/DOCSIS 3.0網路
  • 混合光纖/雙絞線 + VDSL/VDSL2 網路
  • 快速的LTE發展,超高速行動電話技術
  • 普遍存在Wi-Fi的增加,供給移動中的人們上網服務
  • 政府的行動

第4章 固定網路的發展

  • 使用最後一哩電纜的網路發展:DOCSIS 3.1
  • 雙絞線網路的發展:G.fast 及 FTTDP
  • FTTH網路的發展: 10G-PON 技術

第5章 LTE的發展及5G藍圖

  • LTE-A的發明
  • VoLTE的登場
  • HetNet
  • 小型基地台利用的增加
  • LTE-U、LTE LWA、LTE-H:已是業者的網路匯流方法的一部分
  • 5G系統預計自然結束
  • LTE及5G:更佳的回程傳輸的極端必要性

第6章 業者促進FMC (固定網和移動網的匯流) 的要素

  • 配套及搭配出售銷售,FMC的促進
  • 超高速固定、行動時代的基礎設施匯流
  • 固定、行動整合契約
  • 固定-行動的調換怎麼了?
  • 關於固定-行動的組合為何?
  • 固定市場上LTE所扮演的角色為何?

圖表

目錄
Product Code: M15506MR

In both fixed and mobile access markets, the trend is one of increasing speeds, and especially the transition to superfast access (>30 Mbps).

Fixed and mobile NGA network rollouts will go hand in hand in advanced markets, even if the first observations and forecasts give superfast mobile rollouts an edge in terms of pace.

But wireline networks will not disappear anytime soon, as they are vital for mobile backhauling, and fronthauling for future 5G systems.

This report examines what the future is likely to hold for fixed and mobile networks, and system convergence opportunities available to operators.

Table of Contents

1. Executive Summary

2. Methodology and definitions

3. Fixed and mobile networks: state of the art

  • 3.1. Fixed fibre network rollouts
  • 3.2. Fibre being pulled up to subscribers with FTTH/FTTB architectures
    • 3.2.1. Subscriber numbers growing fast
    • 3.2.2. FTTH/FTTB coverage rates progressing
  • 3.3. Hybrid fibre/cable FTTX/DOCSIS 3.0 networks
    • 3.3.1. Growing number of SFB subscribers thanks to the adoption of DOCSIS 3.0 equipment
    • 3.3.2. Coverage bound up with historical TV broadcasting systems
  • 3.4. Hybrid fibre/twisted pair + VDSL/VDSL2 networks
    • 3.4.1. VDSL/VDSL2 supplying only a fraction of high-speed connections
    • 3.4.2. Coverage bound up with the legacy copper network
  • 3.5. Swift rollout of LTE, superfast cellular technology
    • 3.5.1. Remarkable rate of adoption
    • 3.5.2. Steadily increasing coverage
    • 3.5.3. Massive investments
    • 3.5.4. Monetising mobile data traffic
  • 3.6. Increasingly ubiquitous Wi-Fi, supplying Internet access for people on the move
  • 3.7. Government actions
    • 3.7.1. European directives in support of rapid deployments
    • 3.7.2. National SFB programmes
    • 3.7.3. The spectrum issue

4. Fixed network evolution

  • 4.1. Evolution of networks with cable in the last mile: DOCSIS 3.1
  • 4.2. Evolution of twisted pair networks: G.fast and FTTDP
  • 4.3. Evolution of FTTH networks: 10G-PON technology

5. Evolution of LTE and roadmap for 5G

  • 5.1. Advent of LTE-A
  • 5.2. Emergence of VoLTE in 2015
    • 5.2.1. HetNets, small cells and Wi-Fi
  • 5.3. HetNets
  • 5.4. Growing use of small cells
  • 5.5. LTE-U, LTE LWA, LTE-H: already part of operators' approach to network convergence
    • 5.5.1. LTE-U, LTE in unlicensed bands
    • 5.5.2. LTE LWA (LTE Wi-Fi Access) or LTE-H (LTE-HetNet)
  • 5.6. 5G systems expected to be natively convergent
  • 5.7. LTE and 5G: dire need for better backhaul

6. Factors driving operators' fixed and mobile convergence

  • 6.1. Bundles and cross-selling, driving fixed-mobile convergence
  • 6.2. Infrastructure convergence in the superfast fixed and mobile era
  • 6.3. Fixed-mobile consolidation deals
    • 6.3.1. The situation in Europe
    • 6.3.2. Outlook in the United States
  • 6.4. And what of fixed-mobile substitution?
    • 6.4.1. LTE products for residential customers and SMEs, a direct rival for fixed Internet products
    • 6.4.2. LTE, competing head on with fibre
    • 6.4.3. FDD-LTE: an alternative to fixed superfast access in rural areas
    • 6.4.4. TD-LTE: direct rival for WiMAX
  • 6.5. What about a fixed-mobile combination?
  • 6.6. What role for LTE in the fixed market?
    • 6.6.1. LTE has undeniable assets
    • 6.6.2. But LTE technology also has real drawbacks
    • 6.6.3. What strategies are operators using?

Tables

  • Table 1: Number of FTTH/FTTB subscribers in a selection of countries
  • Table 2: Number of FTTX/DOCSIS3.0 subscribers in a selection of countries
  • Table 3: Number of VDSL subscribers in a selection of countries
  • Table 4: The main cellular and high-speed wireless access technologies
  • Table 5: LTE coverage in a selection of countries
  • Table 6: Generations of Wi-Fi
  • Table 7: Comparison of Wi-Fi and cellular technologies' features and functionalities
  • Table 8: Regulatory framework for the BB/SFB market in the United States
  • Table 9: Spectrum for mobile networks (Western Europe)
  • Table 10: Obligations attached to LTE licences in Brazil
  • Table 11: Technical limitations of E1/T1 leased lines as a backhaul solution for LTE-A traffic

Figures

  • Figure 1: Breakdown of FTTH/FTTB subscribers worldwide, at the end of 2014
  • Figure 2: Breakdown of FTTX/ DOCSIS 3.0 subscribers worldwide, at the end of 2014
  • Figure 3: Breakdown of SFB subscribers in a selection of Western European countries, at the end of 2014
  • Figure 4: Breakdown of VDSL subscribers worldwide in December 2014
  • Figure 5: Maximum download speed by mobile technology
  • Figure 6: LTE subscriber growth by region, 2012-2019
  • Figure 7: NTT DOCOMO's LTE Capex in Japan, fiscal years 2011 - 2015
  • Figure 8: Hotspot 2.0 development stages
  • Figure 9: Oi's coverage strategy in Brazil
  • Figure 10: Frequencies used on copper networks
  • Figure 11: Evolution of the different copper pair technologies, available speed and maximum line length
  • Figure 12: Relevance of VDSL solutions according to fibre connection point
  • Figure 13: LTE roadmap
  • Figure 14: HetNet combining macro and small cells
  • Figure 15: How Wi-Fi LTE access works
  • Figure 16: How the bundles affected Virgin Media subscribers churn rates in 2011
  • Figure 17: Comparison of fixed and mobile broadband growth in Sweden, 2008-2014
  • Figure 18: Comparison of fixed and mobile superfast broadband growth in Sweden, 2008-2014
  • Figure 19: Deutsche Telekom's "integrated" strategy
  • Figure 20: Different industry strategies

Slideshow contents

Current status and future development of fixed and mobile network

  • Remarkable rate of adoption for LTE superfast mobile
  • Swift and massive LTE rollouts, vs. steady progress for FTTH/B
  • Wireline and wireless (downstream) speeds theoretically faster than for mobile network

Factors driving fixed-mobile convergence

  • Product convergence: cross-selling
  • Convergence of technical infrastructures
  • Convergence of technologies: cohabitation, cooperation and integration of cellular and non-cellular networks
  • Capitalistic convergence and fixed-mobile substitution
  • Different players' strategies

Companies referenced in the report

Mobile operators

  • AT&T
  • China Unicom
  • Deutsche Telekom
  • EE
  • Netcom
  • Ois
  • Orange
  • SFR-Numericable
  • Sprint
  • Telefónica
  • TeliaSonera
  • Telkom SA
  • T-Mobile USA
  • Verizon
  • Vodafone

Cable companies

  • Cablevision
  • Liberty Global
  • Numericable
  • Virgin Media

Internet companies

  • Apple
  • Facebook
  • Google

Equipment suppliers

  • Alcatel-Lucent
  • Cisco
  • Ericsson
  • Nokia

Other

  • Dish
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