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市場調查報告書

實驗室的行動技術的趨勢 (2015年)

Mobile Technology In The Lab Trends 2015

出版商 HTStec Ltd 商品編碼 328702
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 49 Pages
商品交期: 最快1-2個工作天內
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實驗室的行動技術的趨勢 (2015年) Mobile Technology In The Lab Trends 2015
出版日期: 2015年04月23日 內容資訊: 英文 49 Pages
簡介

本報告提供全球各地 - 美國·歐洲·日本·亞洲各國等 - 實驗室上,使用行動裝置的實驗設備之控制·監視功能和自動化系統方面,研究人員的見解相關調查,目前使用情形和關心的有無,所要求的功能和結構,行動裝置連接實驗設備的方法之方式,彙整引進時的障礙和條件等資訊,為您概述為以下內容。

目錄

  • 摘要整理
  • 分析方法
  • 調查受訪者的所屬機關與回答情形
  • 調查受訪者的地區分佈
  • 調查受訪者的所屬機關的明細
  • 調查受訪者的職位
  • 各機關現在專心致力的研究項目
  • 研究項目的主要用途
  • 行動裝置的目前使用情形
  • 由各組織提供行動裝置的調查受訪者
  • 行動裝置的業務專用應用程式使用情形
  • 行動裝置的職場使用情形
  • 准許在職場以行動裝置連接Wi-Fi的組織
  • 利用供應商提供的行動裝置的調查受訪者
  • 利用行動裝置於實驗設備/自動化系統的監視/控制時的優點
  • 目前的行動應用程式的設備監視·管理的使用情形
  • 分析結果 (1)
  • 調查受訪者最關心行動裝置和實驗設備的互連性
  • 實驗設備用行動應用程式所要求的功能
  • 實驗設備用行動應用程式的潛在的優點
  • 透過行動裝置監視·管理設備的實現方面主要的限制
  • 考慮實驗設備用行動裝置時變更的主要障礙
  • 受歡迎的行動裝置·平台
  • 調查受訪者希望如何使用行動裝置·商務用應用程式
  • 應用程式用暢銷的顯示器·尺寸
  • 應用程式應該支援的外型尺寸
  • 本機應用程式是否比通用Web瀏覽器利用方式受歡迎?
  • 其他的應用程式和瀏覽器,是否能使用同樣的硬體設備?
  • 想在職場以外的地方也使用行動裝置·商務用應用程式的調查受訪者
  • 分析結果 (2)
  • 調查受訪者想使用商務用應用程式的情況
  • 實驗設備用行動應用程式應該實行的事務
  • 應用程式和設備/自動化系統的連接方法
  • 行動裝置·應用程式的結構·使用方法 (1)
  • 行動裝置·應用程式的結構·使用方法 (2)
  • 1個應用程式能控制·監視的實驗設備之上限
  • 應該完全掌握哪個軟體
  • 透過應用來控制、視下所需的各種連結層級
  • 面臨到關係到實驗設備的遠距離操縱之健康方面·安全方面課題的調查受訪者
  • 實驗設備的控制·監視用行動應用程式對於,各組織的認證情形
  • 實驗設備用收費行動應用程式的支付意願
  • 認為需要來自桌上型電腦的遠隔·無線操作的調查受訪者
  • 控制·管理用行動應用程式應該具備的功能
  • 分析結果 (3)
目錄

This market report summarizes the results of HTStec's industry-wide global web-based benchmarking survey on the use of mobile technology to monitor and control of lab instruments and automated systems carried out in April 2015.

The survey was initiated by HTStec as part of our tracking of emerging life science marketplaces.

The questionnaire was compiled to determine current interest and end-user requirements for mobile applications (apps) used to monitor and control lab instruments and automated systems. The results of the survey are intended to be used by instrument vendors to target their future R&D efforts on mobile technology and will assist them to bring new apps to the customer earlier.

Equal emphasis was given to soliciting opinion from all market segments using mobile technology in their labs or from persons interested in the opportunities presented by monitoring or controlling lab instruments or automated systems via apps.

The survey looked at the following aspects of mobile technology in the lab: broad application areas of respondent's work involving lab instruments; use of mobile devices at work, whether supplied by respondent's organization and where it can be used; % of people in respondents lab with an organization supplied mobile device; whether respondent's organization currently provide any organization-specific apps for a mobile device; current use of any mobile devices at the lab bench to aid research today; organizations currently allowing wifi interfaces between lab instrumentation and a lab network or a mobile device; current use of any instrument vendor supplied mobile device or wifi interface; main advantages of using a mobile app to monitor/control a lab instrument; current use of any mobile apps to monitor or control of lab instruments today; lab instruments or automated systems respondents are most interested in interfacing with mobile devices; functionality required in an app for lab instruments; potential benefits and limitations of mobile apps in instrument monitoring/control; main barriers to change when considering the implementation of mobile apps; preferred mobile device platform; BYOD and download app from app-store versus receive mobile hardware together with app installed; preferred display size for the app; form factors the app must support; platform native app versus a generic web browser based view; use of other apps or internet browser on same hardware where a work-related app is installed; use of a work-related app outside a place of work; when respondents would you like to use a work-related app; what tasks should a mobile app perform; how should the app be connected to the instrument/automated system; how should the app be used i.e. single versus multiple mobile device per instrument; should there be a limit on how many similar lab instruments/automated systems one app can control/monitor; should the mobile app be subservient to the instrument software, to any scheduling software or should it be switchable; are different levels of access necessary when monitoring/controlling an instrument via an app; respondents who face any regulatory or health and safety challenges concerning remote control of instruments; are mobile apps enabling monitoring and control of lab instruments approved for use in respondent's organization; how much are respondents are willing to pay for a mobile lab instrument app; whether there is a need for a remote wireless application on a desktop machine; and any lab instrument/automated system functionality that would be ideally suited to control/monitoring by a mobile device app.

The main questionnaire consisted of 33 mainly simple multi-choice questions. In addition, there were 5 questions related solely to administration/survey demographics.

The survey collected 55 validated responses, of these 75% provided comprehensive input.

Survey responses were geographically split: 36% Europe; 36% North America; 15% Asia (excluding Japan & China); 9% Japan; and 4% Rest of World.

Survey respondents were drawn from persons whose current work involves the use of lab instruments and/or automated systems.

Respondents represented: 18 Pharmaceuticals; 8 University; 6 Biotech; 5 Other; 4 Hospital/Clinic/Medical School; 3 Research Institute; 2 Not-for-Profit; 2 Diagnostics; 2 Agri Biotech/Plant Genomics; 1 Military/ Defense; 1 Government Lab; 1 Contract Research Organization; 1 Veterinary Lab/Animal Biotech; and 1 Chemical Industry.

Most survey respondents had a senior job role or position which was in descending order: 10 lab/research managers; 8 section/group leaders; 7 research scientists; 7 senior scientists/research associates; 6 others; 4 post-docs; 3 principal investigators; 3 department heads; 3 directors; 2 presidents; 1 professor/assistant professor; and 1 PhD/graduate student.

Survey results were expressed as an average of all survey respondents. In addition, where appropriate the data was reanalyzed after sub-division into the following 5 survey groups:

  • 1) Pharma & Biotech;
  • 2) University;
  • 3) Other Organizations;
  • 4) Europe; and
  • 5) North America.

The majority of survey respondent's current work involves both lab instruments and automated systems.

The broad application area where most use of lab instruments resides was drug discovery/screening.

The majority of respondents made use of mobile devices at work, most of these mobile devices were private, and the majority had no restrictions on where they can be used.

A median of 1-25% of people in respondent's organization have a work supplied mobile device.

The majority do not have any organization-specific or work-related apps on their mobile devices.

Only a minority use mobile devices to aid research at the lab bench today.

Only a minority of respondent's organizations allow wifi interfaces between instruments/automation and a lab network or mobile device.

Only a minority currently use an instrument vendor supplied mobile device or wifi interface.

Feedback on the main advantages of using a mobile app to monitor/control a lab instrument/automated system versus a cable connected PC/laptop or an on board touch screen are documented.

Only a minority use mobile apps to monitor or control lab instruments or automated systems today.

The lab instrument most were interested in interfacing with mobile devices were workstations connecting multiple devices.

Monitor the status of a run in progress was rated the functionality most required in a mobile app for lab instruments/automated systems.

User can immediately see if any interaction is needed was rated the most important potential benefits of using a mobile app for lab instruments/automated systems.

Security concerns/risks to organization's IT infrastructure/network was rated the main limitation of enabling mobile device control or monitoring of lab instruments.

Integration with other systems was rated the main barrier to change when considering mobile apps for lab instrument control or monitoring.

The preferred mobile device platform was no preference.

The preferred way to access a work-related app for a mobile device was BYOD and download app from app-store.

Tablet was ranked the most wanted preferred display size of an app.

The form factor an app must most support was the smartphone.

A platform native app was preferred over a generic web browser based view.

The majority think that the user should be able to use other apps or internet browser on the same hardware that a work-related app is installed.

The majority want to be able to use a work-related app outside their place of work.

Most want to use a work-related app mainly during work hours.

The majority want to mobile app for lab instruments/automated systems to both monitor and control functionality.

Most think the mobile app should be connected to the instrument/automated system via a company or organization network or VPN.

The majority think that multiple devices can use the same app; with a median of 4-5 mobile devices using the same app; but it requires creation of specific user roles/responsibilities for error handling.

The majority think apps should be able to control more than one similar instrument/automated system.

Opinion on which software should be the master was split between the instrument itself or switchable.

The majority think there must be different level of access/hierarchy when monitoring/controlling an instrument/automated system via an app.

A minority face health & safety challenges concerning remote control of instruments via a mobile app.

Opinion of whether mobile apps enabling monitoring & control of lab instruments need approval in respondent's organization was mixed.

Most respondents are not willing to pay for a mobile lab instrument app.

The majority see the need for a remote wireless application on a desktop machine.

Feedback on some applications (lab instrument functionality) ideally suited to control/monitoring via a mobile app was listed.

The full report provides the data, details of the breakdown of the responses to each question, and its segmentation. It also highlights some interesting differences between the survey groups.

Table of Contents

  • Executive Summary
  • Table Of Contents
  • Survey Methodology
  • Respondent's Organisation & Response To Survey
  • Respondent's Geographic Origin
  • Respondent's Company Or Organisational Origin
  • Respondent's Job Role
  • Current Work Involving Lab Instruments
  • Broad Application Area Where Work On Lab Instruments Mainly Resides
  • Current Use Of Mobile Devices At Work
  • Respondents With Mobile Devices Supplied By Organization
  • Use Of Any Organization-Specific Apps On Mobile Devices
  • Current Use Of Mobile Devices At The Lab Bench
  • Organizations Allowing Wifi Interfaces Between Lab Instruments & Mobiles
  • Respondents Using An Instrument Vendor Supplied Mobile Device
  • Main Advantages Of Using A Mobile App To Monitor/Control A Lab Instrument/Automated System
  • Use Of Mobile Apps To Monitor Or Control Instruments Today
  • Summary Of Survey Findings (1)
  • Lab Instruments Respondents Are Most Interested In Interfacing With Mobile Devices
  • Functionality Required In a Mobile App For Lab Instruments
  • Potential Benefits Of Mobile Apps For Lab Instruments
  • Main Limitations Of Enabling Mobile Device Control Or Monitoring Of Lab Instruments
  • Main Barriers To Change When Considering Mobile Apps For Lab Instruments
  • Preferred Mobile Device Platform
  • How Respondents Want To Access A work-Related App For A Mobile Device
  • Preferred Display Size For The App
  • What Form Factors Must The App Support
  • Is A Native App Preferred Over A Generic Web Browser Based View
  • Should Other Apps Or Internet Browser Be Used In The Same Hardware
  • Respondents Who Want To Use A Work-Related App Outside Their Place Of Work
  • Summary of Survey Findings (2)
  • When Respondents Want To Use A Work-Related App
  • What Tasks Should A Mobile App For Lab Instruments Perform
  • How Should The App Be Connected To The Instrument/Automated System
  • How A Mobile Device App Should Be Configured And Used (1)
  • How A Mobile Device App Should Be Configured And Used (2)
  • Limits On How Many Similar Instruments One App Can Control/Monitor
  • Which Software Should Be The Master
  • Are Different Levels Of Access Needed When Monitoring/Controlling Via An App
  • Respondents Who Face Health & Safety Challenges Concerning Remote Control Of Instruments
  • Are Mobile Apps Enabling Monitoring & Control Of Lab Instruments Approved In Respondents Organization
  • Respondents Willing To Pay For A Mobile Lab Instrument Lab
  • Respondents Who See A Need For A Remote Wireless Application On A Desktop Machine
  • Functionality Ideally Suited To Control/Monitoring Via A Mobile App
  • Summary Of Survey Findings (3)
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