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市場調查報告書

NFV MANO:問題點與解決法

NFV MANO: What's Wrong & How to Fix It

出版商 Heavy Reading 商品編碼 324556
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 63 Pages
商品交期: 最快1-2個工作天內
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NFV MANO:問題點與解決法 NFV MANO: What's Wrong & How to Fix It
出版日期: 2015年02月13日 內容資訊: 英文 63 Pages
簡介

本報告提供NFV MANO (網路功能虛擬化的管理和譜) 相關調查分析、必要性和實行的影響、OpenStack、主要供應商等相關的系統性資訊。

第1章 簡介和主要調查結果

第2章 NFV MANO定義

  • NFV MANO是必要的理由
  • 所謂NFV MANO

第3章 NFV MANO的實行

  • NFV各種Orchestration
  • 虛擬化方法影響NFV MANO的實行
  • 未來超級規模的管理和譜
  • OPNFV承諾實行NFV MANO基準
  • NFV MANO供應商能迴避固定化嗎

第4章 VIM候補的OpenStack的進展

  • OpenStack是VIM的勝者嗎
  • OpenStack和NFV
  • OpenStack的選擇標準

第5章 NFV MANO供應商策略

  • NFV MANO供應商的分類
  • NFV 索引架構供應商分析
  • NFV MANO供應商分析
  • CMS供應商分析

第6章 供應商簡介

  • Alcatel-Lucent
  • Amdocs
  • Canonical
  • Cisco
  • Cyan
  • Ericsson
  • GigaSpaces
  • HP
  • Huawei
  • IBM
  • Intel
  • Mirantis
  • 日本電氣
  • Nokia
  • Oracle
  • Overture
  • Red Hat
  • VMware
  • Wind River

第7章 業者的NFV MANO預測

  • BT
  • Telefonica

第8章 結論

附錄

圖表

目錄

In 2014, Axel Clauberg of Deutsche Telekom - a key network functions virtualization (NFV) "mover and shaker" - coined the term "zoo of orchestrators" to describe different vendors' interpretations of what is still a weakly defined component of the NFV reference architecture: the NFV Management and Orchestration (MANO) stack.

NFV MANO is the largest source of operator confusion and the biggest barrier to NFV adoption today. Yet it is also critical to the NFV venture: The NFV MANO architecture is responsible for orchestrating and managing the cloud infrastructure on which virtualized network functions (VNFs) execute; the VNFs themselves, as they run in a cloud execution environment; and - because we are talking about the network, where network functions don't exist in isolation from one another - the services that are composed from multiple, chained VNFs, as they execute across the cloud.

At its simplest, NFV MANO consists of a cloud management system (CMS) and a service orchestration engine that knows how to deploy services composed of VNFs and how to assure those services throughout their lifetime in a dynamic cloud environment. But life is not so simple: first, because a CMS is no better defined than the MANO stack, so different candidate CMSs have different sets of capabilities; and second, because it turns out that a CMS needs significant extension to support NFV. An NFV MANO vendor's implementation is contingent on a number of factors at this early stage in the market, including the kind of VNFs it needs to orchestrate and manage and, perhaps more critically, its CMS assumptions, starting point and partnerships.

OpenStack is the clear favorite of all possible candidates for the CMS - or to use NFV MANO terminology, the Virtualized Infrastructure Manager (VIM). OpenStack is immature today and needs significant proprietary extensions to support NFV. This means that each NFV MANO vendor is wrapping OpenStack with its own, non-standardized implementation of these extensions, often displacing them into higher levels of the MANO stack to avoid accusations of "forking" open source code.

Moves are afoot through the Open Platform for NFV (OPNFV) Project and the OpenStack sub-team for NFV to fast-track the development of open source versions of NFV extensions, but at present, vendor support for OpenStack is no guarantee of interoperability between NFV MANO implementations and other components of the NFV reference architecture: VNFs and NFV infrastructure (NFVI) cloud platforms.

In its second, "implementation" phase, the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) NFV Industry Specification Group (ISG) intends to focus on creating clearer, prescriptive definitions of the functionality that operators want to see at each level of the MANO stack. Since operators may wish to plug in different vendors at different MANO levels, they don't want to pay twice for the same functionality, or have to sort out conflicting capabilities if they want to offer advanced NFV services, such as NFVI as a service (NFVIaaS) or VNF(s) as a service (VNFaaS).

‘NFV MANO: What's Wrong & How to Fix It’ looks at the need for clarification around NFV MANO and new proposals and initiatives that could influence its implementation. It discusses the way in which OpenStack is influencing interpretations of NFV MANO and analyzes the approaches that different vendors are taking to fulfilling one or more layers of the NFV MANO stack.

The report profiles 19 NFV MANO solution vendors*, which we classify into three categories:

  • NFV reference architecture vendors - the world's largest network equipment vendors and IT players, selling solutions for every aspect of the NFV reference architecture
  • NFV MANO vendors - a small, select band of vendors that focus on the NFV MANO stack only and intend to remain neutral regarding VNFs and NFVI hardware and software
  • CMS vendors - these vendors sell a VIM capability, and are forging partnerships with larger network equipment providers, in a bid to become a strategic component of their NFV reference architecture implementations

Clauberg's "zoo of orchestrators" has arisen as early implementers of NFV MANO have built extensions to IT CMS in ways that are often highly specific to different VNF use cases and/or NFVIs. In the absence of strong definitions for each of the functional layers of the NFV MANO stack, they have idiosyncratically implemented MANO functionality, especially the additions to the IT CMS needed to support NFV. Most of this additional functionality ends up in implementations of the NFV Orchestrator, as shown in the excerpt below.

Excerpt 1:
Range of NFV Orchestrator Functions in Commercial Implementations

                        Source: Heavy Reading

The NFV reference architecture vendors are just as confused as the rest of the market about what should go into each layer of the NFV MANO stack, and agree that there is an urgent need for a prescriptive taxonomy. As a result, their NFV MANO implementations remain works in progress. The excerpt below summarizes vendor virtualization and MANO stack partner/product strategies.

Excerpt 2:
NFV Virtualization/Virtualization Management Components by Vendor

                        Source: Heavy Reading

Report Scope & Structure

‘NFV MANO: What's Wrong & How to Fix It’ is structured as follows:

Section I is an introduction to the report, including the key findings of our research.

Section II assesses the current shortcomings in the way NFV MANO has been defined and the implications for its implementation.

Section III analyzes the issues that are affecting the implementation of NFV MANO.

Section IV looks at the progress the OpenStack initiative is making in supporting NFV and what this means for the NFV MANO VIM layer.

Section V discusses vendor strategies behind their NFV MANO stacks or component products.

Section VI profiles 19 leading suppliers that are engaging with NFV MANO.

Section VII provides two network operator perspectives on NFV MANO.

Section VIII summarizes the conclusions of our research.

‘NFV MANO: What's Wrong & How to Fix It’ is published in PDF format.

Table of Contents

LIST OF FIGURES

I. INTRODUCTION & KEY FINDINGS

  • 1.1. Key Findings
  • 1.2. Report Scope & Structure

II. DEFINING NFV MANO

  • 2.1. Why Is NFV MANO Needed?
  • 2.2. What Is NFV MANO?
    • NFV MANO & the IT Cloud Management System
    • The IT CMS Needs Extending to Become an NFV MANO Solution
    • Reasons for Separating the NFV MANO Layers
    • Should NFV MANO Have Three or Four Layers?
    • Implications of Separating Resource & Service Management at NFV-O Level

III. IMPLEMENTING NFV MANO

  • 3.1. The Rise of the NFV "Orchestration Zoo"
  • 3.2. Virtualization Approach Affects NFV MANO Implementation
  • 3.3. Toward a Hyperscale Management & Orchestration Future
  • 3.4. OPNFV Promises an NFV MANO Reference Implementation
    • Open Platform for NFV Initiative
  • 3.5. Can NFV MANO Vendor Lock-In Be Avoided?

IV. OPENSTACK'S PROGRESS AS A CANDIDATE VIM

  • 4.1. Is OpenStack Winning the Race for VIM?
  • 4.2. OpenStack & NFV
    • The Evolution of OpenStack
    • Plans for an OpenStack Core Implementation
    • OpenStack & NFV VIM Requirements
  • 4.3. OpenStack Selection Criteria

V. SUPPLIER STRATEGIES FOR NFV MANO

  • 5.1. Classifying NFV MANO Vendors
  • 5.2. NFV Reference Architecture Vendor Analysis
  • 5.3. NFV MANO Vendor Analysis
  • 5.4. CMS Vendor Analysis

VI. SUPPLIER PROFILES

  • 6.1. Alcatel-Lucent
  • 6.2. Amdocs
  • 6.3. Canonical
  • 6.4. Cisco
  • 6.5. Cyan
  • 6.6. Ericsson
  • 6.7. GigaSpaces
  • 6.8. HP
  • 6.9. Huawei
  • 6.10. IBM
  • 6.11. Intel
  • 6.12. Mirantis
  • 6.13. NEC
  • 6.14. Nokia
  • 6.15. Oracle
  • 6.16. Overture
  • 6.17. Red Hat
  • 6.18. VMware
    • OpenStack Positioning
    • OpenStack Distribution Strategy
  • 6.19. Wind River

VII. OPERATOR PERSPECTIVES ON NFV MANO

  • 7.1. BT
    • Splitting the NFV Orchestrator
    • NFV Workflow Abstraction & Modularity
    • Instrumenting the NFV Architecture
    • Defining the Layers of the NFV MANO Architecture
  • 7.2. Telefónica

VIII. CONCLUSION

APPENDIX A: ABOUT THE AUTHOR

APPENDIX B: LEGAL DISCLAIMER

LIST OF FIGURES*

SECTION - I

SECTION - II

  • Figure 2.1: NFV Reference Architecture
  • Figure 2.2: NFV MANO Architecture Layers

SECTION - III

  • Figure 3.1: Range of NFV-O Functions in Commercial Implementations
  • Figure 3.2: Types of VM Workloads
  • Figure 3.3: Open Source Foundations for OPNFV
  • Figure 3.4: Implementation Strategies for NFV MANO

SECTION - IV

  • Figure 4.1: OpenStack Releases
  • Figure 4.2: OpenStack Capabilities

SECTION - V

  • Figure 5.1: NFV Virtualization/Virtualization Management Components by Vendor
  • Figure 5.2: Vendor Strategies for VNFs & Adjacent Technologies
  • Figure 5.3: Extent of NFV MANO Vendors' Portfolios
  • Figure 5.4: Extent of CMS Vendor Portfolios

SECTION - VI

  • Figure 6.1: Intel Contributions to OpenStack for SDN & NFV
  • Figure 6.2: BT Contribution to ETSI MANO Architecture Discussion

SECTION - VII

SECTION - VIII

*All charts and figures in this report are original to Heavy Reading, unless otherwise noted.

NFV MANO SOLUTION VENDORS PROFILED:*

  • Alcatel-Lucent (NYSE: ALU)
  • Amdocs Ltd. (NYSE: DOX)
  • Canonical Ltd.
  • Cisco Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: CSCO)
  • Cyan Inc. (NYSE: CYNI)
  • Ericsson AB (Nasdaq: ERICY)
  • GigaSpaces Technologies Inc.
  • Hewlett-Packard Co. (NYSE: HPQ)
  • Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd.
  • IBM Corp. (NYSE: IBM)
  • Intel Corp. (Nasdaq: INTC)
  • Mirantis Inc.
  • NEC Corp. (TSE: 6701)
  • Nokia Corp. (NYSE: NOK)
  • Oracle Corp. (Nasdaq: ORCL)
  • Overture Networks Inc.
  • Red Hat Inc. (NYSE: RHT)
  • VMware Inc. (NYSE: VMW)
  • Wind River Systems Inc., a subsidiary of Intel Corp. (Nasdaq: INTC)
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