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市場調查報告書

Frontier Pharma:思覺失調症與關聯的適應症 - First-in-Class的分子標的

Frontier Pharma: Schizophrenia and Associated Indications - Small but Diverse Range of First-in-Class Molecular Targets Hold Promise for Treatment of Negative and Cognitive Symptoms

出版商 GBI Research 商品編碼 357637
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 73 Pages
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Frontier Pharma:思覺失調症與關聯的適應症 - First-in-Class的分子標的 Frontier Pharma: Schizophrenia and Associated Indications - Small but Diverse Range of First-in-Class Molecular Targets Hold Promise for Treatment of Negative and Cognitive Symptoms
出版日期: 2016年04月01日 內容資訊: 英文 73 Pages
簡介

思覺失調症,是有異常的社會行動和認識現實困難的特徵的嚴重精神障礙。

本報告提供思覺失調症治療藥市場相關調查分析,革新案例,臨床、商業性情形,開發中產品的評估,計劃評估,最近的交易等相關的系統性資訊。

第1章 目錄

第2章 摘要整理

第3章 革新案例

  • 生技藥品的機會擴大
  • 分子標的多樣化
  • 創新的First-in-Class產品 (劃時代的醫藥品) 的開發現在也富有魅力
  • 法規、償付政策,對First-in-Class產品的革新有利
  • 報告指南

第4章 臨床、商業性情形

  • 疾病概要
  • 流行病學
  • 病因
  • 病理生理學
  • 症狀
  • 診斷
  • 預後
  • 治療的選項
  • 上市產品概要
  • 目前未滿足需求

第5章 開發中產品革新的評估

  • 思覺失調症治療藥開發平台:各分子類型、階段、治療標的
  • 思覺失調症治療藥市場與開發平台計劃比較分佈:各治療標的系列
  • First-in-Class開發平台計劃

第6章 思覺失調症的病理生理學與創新的調整

  • 中樞神經系統的信號傳達網路的複雜度
  • First-in-Class標的矩陣的評估

第7章 First-in-Class標的評估

第8章 交易與策略性整合

  • 許可證交易
  • 共同開發交易
  • 不參與許可證/共同開發交易的First-in-Class計劃

第9章 附錄

圖表

目錄
Product Code: GBIHC393MR

Executive Summary

Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder that is characterized by abnormal social behavior and failure to recognize what is real; its symptoms are broadly divided into positive, negative and cognitive. The treatment of schizophrenia is multi-factorial and includes medical, psychological and psychosocial inputs. Antipsychotic medication is the main pharmacological agent used, along with counselling, job training, and social rehabilitation. Both typical and atypical antipsychotics are used, and the choice of medication is usually left to the discretion of the treating physician. Clozapine, which is an atypical antipsychotic that binds to serotonin and dopamine receptors, is often given to patients who do not improve with other antipsychotics.

Current treatments, although effective for positive symptoms, have not proven as effective for negative symptoms and cognitive dysfunction, nor are there are any disease-modifying drugs currently available. The pipeline for schizophrenia is small, particularly given the large patient population, it also has low levels of innovation in comparison to other psychiatric indications in the pharmaceutical industry. However, the overall level of innovation in the pipeline for schizophrenia-related indications (which includes depression, panic disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and cognitive deficit) is far higher, with these related products having the potential to provide some benefit to patients with schizophrenia.

Scope

  • The current clinical landscape of schizophrenia
  • What is the pathophysiology of schizophrenia?
  • How is schizophrenia diagnosed?
  • What are the current treatment options?

The schizophrenia pipeline is small, although there is a much larger pipeline for its related indications.

  • What are the common targets and mechanisms of action of pipeline therapies?
  • Will the pipeline address unmet needs such as a lack of diverse treatment options for schizophrenia patients, particularly those with negative or cognitive symptoms?
  • What is the composition of the pipeline for schizophrenia-related indications, and will they be of benefit to schizophrenia patients?
  • First-in-class products and targets currently within the schizophrenia pipeline
  • What are the most promising first-in-class targets for schizophrenia?
  • Detailed outlook on first-in-class targets and whether they have other therapeutic potential across the industry
  • Licensing deals are the most common form of strategic alliance in schizophrenia
  • How do deal frequency and value compare between target families and molecule types?
  • How do licensing and co-development deals compare between first-in-class and non-first-in-class profiles?

Reasons to buy

This report will allow you to-

  • Understand the current clinical and commercial landscape by considering disease pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognosis, and the treatment options available at each stage of diagnosis, including a clinical comparison of marketed therapies
  • Visualize the composition of the schizophrenia market in terms of dominant therapies for each patient subset along with their clinical and commercial standing. Unmet needs in the current market are highlighted to allow a competitive understanding of gaps in the current market.
  • Analyze the schizophrenia pipeline and stratify pipeline therapies by stage of development, molecule type and molecular target. There are promising signs in the pipeline that the industry is seeking novel approaches to treating schizophrenia.
  • Assess the therapeutic potential of first-in-class targets. Using a proprietary matrix, first-in-class products have been assessed and ranked according to clinical potential. Promising early-stage targets have been further reviewed in greater detail.
  • Identify commercial opportunities in the schizophrenia deals landscape by analyzing trends in licensing and co-development deals and producing a list of schizophrenia therapies that are not yet involved in deals, and may be potential investment opportunities.

Table of Contents

1. Table of Contents

  • 1.1. List of Tables
  • 1.2. List of Figures

2. Executive Summary

  • 2.1. A Complex and Poorly Understood Disorder, with Numerous Unmet Needs
  • 2.2. Small Pipeline for Schizophrenia with Few Signs of Innovation
  • 2.3. Extensive Pipeline for Associated Indications

3. The Case for Innovation

  • 3.1. Growing Opportunities for Biologic Products
  • 3.2. Diversification of Molecular Targets
  • 3.3. Innovative First-in-Class Product Developments Remain Attractive
  • 3.4. Regulatory and Reimbursement Policy Shifts Favor First-in-Class Product Innovation
  • 3.5. GBI Research Report Guidance

4. Clinical and Commercial Landscape

  • 4.1. Disease Overview
  • 4.2. Epidemiology
  • 4.3. Disease Etiology
  • 4.4. Disease Pathophysiology
    • 4.4.1. Susceptibility Genes
    • 4.4.2. Neurotransmission Alterations
    • 4.4.3. Phosphatidylinositol Signaling
  • 4.5. Disease Symptoms
  • 4.6. Indications Associated With Schizophrenia
    • 4.6.1. Panic Disorder
    • 4.6.2. Depression
    • 4.6.3. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
    • 4.6.4. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
    • 4.6.5. Cognitive Impairment
  • 4.7. Diagnosis
  • 4.8. Prognosis
  • 4.9. Treatment Options
  • 4.10. Overview of Marketed Products
    • 4.10.1. Molecule Type and Target Analysis
  • 4.11. Current Unmet Needs

5. Assessment of Pipeline Product Innovation

  • 5.1. Schizophrenia Pipeline by Molecule Type, Phase and Therapeutic Target
  • 5.2. Comparative Distribution of Programs between Schizophrenia Disease Market and Pipeline by Therapeutic Target Family
  • 5.3. First-in-Class Pipeline Programs

6. Schizophrenia Pathophysiology and Innovation Alignment

  • 6.1. The Complexity of Signaling Networks in the Central Nervous System
  • 6.2. First-in-Class Target Matrix Assessment

7. First-in-Class Target Evaluation

  • 7.1. Pipeline Programs Targeting D-Amino Acid Oxidase
  • 7.2. Pipeline Programs Targeting Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor, Subunit Alpha
  • 7.3. Pipeline Programs Targeting Glutamate Carboxypeptidase
  • 7.4. Pipeline Programs Targeting Phosphodiesterase
  • 7.5. Pipeline Programs Targeting Potassium Voltage-Gated Channel Subfamily C, Member
  • 7.6. Pipeline Programs Targeting Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor
  • 7.7. Pipeline Programs Targeting G Protein-Coupled Receptor
  • 7.8. Pipeline Programs Targeting Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor
    • 7.8.1. Pipeline Programs Targeting Pipeline Programs Targeting Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor
    • 7.8.2. Pipeline Programs Targeting Pipeline Programs Targeting Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor
  • 7.9. Pipeline Programs Targeting Sodium and Chloride Dependent Glycine Transporter
  • 7.10. Pipeline Programs Targeting Trace Amine-Associated Receptor
  • 7.11. Conclusion

8. Deals and Strategic Consolidations

  • 8.1. Licensing Deals
  • 8.2. Co-development Deals
  • 8.3. First-in-Class Programs not Involved in Licensing or Co-development Deals

9. Appendix

  • 9.1. Abbreviations
  • 9.2. Bibliography
  • 9.3. Research Methodology
  • 9.4. Secondary Research
    • 9.4.1. Marketed Product Heatmaps and Treatment Algorithm
    • 9.4.2. Pipeline Analysis
    • 9.4.3. First-in-Class Matrix Assessment
    • 9.4.4. First-in-Class Target Profiles
    • 9.4.5. Licensing and Co-development Deals
  • 9.5. Contact Us
  • 9.6. Disclaimer

List of Tables

  • Table 1: American Psychiatry Association DSM-5 Schizophrenia Criteria
  • Table 2: World Health Organization ICD-10 Schizophrenia criteria
  • Table 3: Data for D-Amino Acid Oxidase as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 4: Evidence for D-Amino Acid Oxidase as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 5: Data for Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor, Subunit Alpha 5 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 6: Evidence for Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor, Subunit Alpha 5 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 7: Data for Glutamate Carboxypeptidase 2 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 8: Evidence for Glutamate Carboxypeptidase 2 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 9: Data for Phosphodiesterase 9 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 10: Evidence for Phosphodiesterase 9 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 11: Data for Potassium Voltage-Gated Channel Subfamily C, Member 1 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 12: Evidence for Potassium Voltage-Gated Channel Subfamily C, Member 1 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 13: Data for Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor 52 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 14: Evidence for Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor 52 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 15: Data for G Protein-Coupled Receptor 78 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 16: Evidence for G Protein-Coupled Receptor 78 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 17: Data for Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor 85 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 18: Evidence for Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor 85 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 19: Data for Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor 173 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 20: Evidence for Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor 173 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 21: Data for Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor 27 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 22: Evidence for Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor 27 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 23: Data for Sodium and Chloride Dependent Glycine Transporter 1 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 24: Evidence for Sodium and Chloride Dependent Glycine Transporter 1 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 25: Data for Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 as a Therapeutic Target
  • Table 26: Evidence for Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 as a Therapeutic Target

List of Figures

  • Figure 1: Innovation Trends in Product Approvals, 1987-2012
  • Figure 2: Sales Performance of First-in-Class and Non-First-in-Class Products Post Marketing Approval, 2006-2013
  • Figure 3: Molecular Targets of Marketed Products
  • Figure 4: Schizophrenia Pipeline by Stage of Development and Molecule Type
  • Figure 5: Schizophrenia-Associated Indications Pipeline by Stage of Development and Molecule Type
  • Figure 6: Pipeline for Schizophrenia by Molecular Target
  • Figure 7: Pipeline for Schizophrenia-Associated Indications by Molecular Target
  • Figure 8: Molecular Target Category Comparison, Pipeline and Marketed Products
  • Figure 9: Molecular Target Category Comparison, Pipeline and Marketed Products
  • Figure 10: Molecular Target Category Comparison, Pipeline and Marketed Products
  • Figure 11: First-in-Class and Established Molecular Targets in the Pipeline for Schizophrenia
  • Figure 12: First-in-Class and Established Molecular Targets in the Pipeline for Schizophrenia-Associated Indications
  • Figure 13: Schizophrenia, Global, First-in-Class Pipeline Products - Part 1
  • Figure 14: Schizophrenia, Global, First-in-Class Pipeline Products - Part 2
  • Figure 15: Schizophrenia, Global, First-in-Class Pipeline Products - Part 3
  • Figure 16: Schizophrenia, Global, First-in-Class Pipeline Products - Part 4
  • Figure 17: Schizophrenia, Global, First-in-Class Pipeline Products - Part 5
  • Figure 18: First-in-Class Molecular Target Analysis Matrix (Schizophrenia Pipeline)
  • Figure 19: First-in-Class Molecular Target Analysis Matrix (Depression Pipeline)
  • Figure 20: First-in-Class Molecular Target Analysis Matrix (Panic Disorders Pipeline)
  • Figure 21: First-in-Class Molecular Target Analysis Matrix (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Pipeline)
  • Figure 22: First-in-Class Molecular Target Analysis Matrix (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Pipeline)
  • Figure 23: First-in-Class Molecular Target Analysis Matrix (Cognitive Deficit Pipeline)
  • Figure 24: Pipeline Programs Targeting D-Amino Acid Oxidase
  • Figure 25: Pipeline Programs Targeting Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor, Subunit Alpha
  • Figure 26: Pipeline Programs Targeting Glutamate Carboxypeptidase
  • Figure 27: Pipeline Programs Targeting Phosphodiesterase
  • Figure 28: Pipeline Programs Targeting Potassium Voltage-Gated Channel Subfamily C, Member
  • Figure 29: Pipeline Programs Targeting Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor
  • Figure 30: Pipeline Programs Targeting G Protein-Coupled Receptor
  • Figure 31: Pipeline Programs Targeting Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor
  • Figure 32: Pipeline Programs Targeting Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor
  • Figure 33: Pipeline Programs Targeting Probable G Protein-Coupled Receptor
  • Figure 34: Pipeline Programs Targeting Sodium and Chloride Dependent Glycine Transporter
  • Figure 35: Pipeline Programs Targeting Trace Amine-Associated Receptor
  • Figure 36: Industry-Wide Deals by Stage of Development, 2006-2014
  • Figure 37: Industry-Wide Deals by Stage of Development, 2006-2014
  • Figure 38: Licensing Deals by Region and Value, 2006-2015
  • Figure 39: Licensing Deals by Year, 2006-2015
  • Figure 40: Licensing Deals by Stage of Development
  • Figure 41: Licensing Deal Value by Molecule Type
  • Figure 42: Licensing Deal Value by Molecular Target
  • Figure 43: Summary of Licensing Deals, 2006-2015
  • Figure 44: Co-development Deals by Region and Value, 2006-2015
  • Figure 45: Co-development Deals by Year, 2006-2015
  • Figure 46: Co-development Deals by Stage of Development
  • Figure 47: Co-development by Stage of Development and Molecule Type
  • Figure 48: Co-development by Stage of Development and Molecular Target
  • Figure 49: Summary of Co-development Deals, 2006-2015
  • Figure 50: First-in-Class Programs for Schizophrenia and its Associated Indications with No Recorded Prior Deal Involvement, 2006-2016
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