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市場調查報告書

亞洲的動畫市場:策略·趨勢·市場機會

Asian Animation Industry: Strategies, Trends and Opportunities

出版商 Digital Vector, Inc. 商品編碼 135490
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 549 Pages
商品交期: 最快1-2個工作天內
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亞洲的動畫市場:策略·趨勢·市場機會 Asian Animation Industry: Strategies, Trends and Opportunities
出版日期: 2016年05月24日 內容資訊: 英文 549 Pages
簡介

本報告提供亞洲的動畫產業發展過程與現狀等調查分析,彙整產業情形,市場規模·成長預測,經營模式,商務策略,風險與課題,主要企業等資訊。

簡介

印度

  • 產業的現狀
  • 動畫工作室的經營模式
  • 動畫電視台的現狀
  • 動畫產業的規模
  • Chhota Bheem:在印度成功的現場動畫生產
  • 動畫工作室的統計
  • 風險
  • 未來預測
  • 動畫工作室的策略
  • 動畫學校
  • 主要動畫工作室

中國

  • 產業的現狀
  • 電視動畫的中國市場
  • 動畫工作室的經營模式
  • 動畫產業的規模
  • 動畫工作室的統計
  • 風險
  • 未來預測
  • 動畫工作室的策略
  • 動畫工作室

韓國

  • 產業的出現
  • 動畫工作室的功能
  • 變化的經營模式
  • 產業的現狀
  • 課題
  • 動畫工作室的策略
  • 市場機會
  • 動畫工作室的統計
  • 未來預測
  • 動畫學校
  • 動畫工作室

菲律賓

  • 產業的現狀
  • 動畫的外包
  • 長篇動畫
  • 產業的復甦
  • 產業的優點
  • 課題
  • 動畫教育
  • 動畫產業的規模
  • 動畫工作室的統計
  • 動畫工作室的策略
  • 未來預測
  • 動畫工作室

台灣

  • 動盪時代的結束
  • 產業的現狀
  • 課題
  • 台灣動畫工作室的威脅
  • 動畫學校
  • 最初的3D長篇動畫
  • 動畫工作室的統計
  • 動畫工作室的策略
  • 未來預測
  • 動畫工作室
  • 主要的動畫工作室

越南

  • 初期的外資進入
  • 主要趨勢
  • 越南的3D長篇動畫
  • 現場的動畫生產
  • 課題
  • 未來趨勢
  • 動畫工作室
  • 動畫工作室的統計
  • 動畫工作室的策略
  • 未來預測

日本

  • 主要趨勢
  • 成功經營模式
  • 動畫的出口
  • 獲得全球性成功的日本動畫
  • 日本的動畫製作模式
  • 課題
  • 未來趨勢
  • 動畫工作室的統計
  • 動畫工作室的策略
  • 動畫工作室

泰國

  • 主要趨勢
  • 最初的3D長篇動畫
  • 政府的津貼
  • 產業推動因素
  • 課題
  • 產業的機會
  • 動畫工作室的策略
  • 動畫工作室
  • 動畫工作室的統計

新加坡

  • 產業需求的扳機
  • 現場的動畫生產
  • 政府措施
  • 產業推動因素
  • 課題
  • 動畫工作室的策略
  • 動畫工作室的統計
  • 動畫工作室
  • 動畫學校

馬來西亞

  • 政府的津貼
  • 產業推動因素
  • 課題
  • 市場機會
  • 動畫工作室的策略
  • 最初的3D長篇動畫
  • 動畫工作室的統計
  • 動畫工作室

印尼

  • 政府的津貼
  • 最初的3D長篇動畫
  • 課題
  • 動畫工作室的統計
  • 動畫工作室

俄羅斯

  • 動畫電影市場
  • 獲得全球性成功的俄羅斯動畫
  • 產業推動因素
  • 課題
  • 市場機會
  • 動畫工作室的策略
  • 政府的津貼與財政支援
  • 動畫工作室
  • 動畫產業的價值
  • 動畫產業的規模
  • 動畫工作室的統計

以色列

  • 產業推動因素
  • 最初的長篇動畫
  • 課題
  • 動畫工作室的統計
  • 動畫工作室

巴基斯坦

  • 產業的現狀
  • 最初的3D長篇動畫
  • 產業推動因素
  • 課題
  • 風險
  • 市場機會
  • 動畫產業的策略
  • 未來預測
  • 動畫工作室
  • 動畫工作室的統計

孟加拉

  • 產業的現狀
  • 孟加拉獲得全球性成功的短篇動畫
  • 產業推動因素
  • 課題
  • 風險
  • 市場機會
  • 動畫產業的策略
  • 未來預測
  • 動畫工作室

圖表

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目錄

Much of Asia's animation production since the 1960s has been tied to foreign interests attracted by stable and inexpensive labour supplies. For nearly forty years, western studios have established and maintained production facilities, first in Japan, then in South Korea and Taiwan, and now also in the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand, India, Indonesia, and China. The economics of the industry made it feasible for Asia to feed the cartoon world, to the extent that today, about 90% of all American television animation is produced in Asia. The usual procedure is for pre-production (preparing the script, storyboard, and exposure sheets) to be done in the United States or other headquarter countries, after which, the package is sent to Asia for production (drawing cels, colouring by hand, inking, painting, and camera work). The work is sent back to the U.S. or other headquarter country for post-production (film editing, colour timing, and sound). Asian animation companies bid fiercely for part of the global business, insisting that it provides employment and skills for young people, brings in needed foreign capital, and adds to the creation or enhancement of domestic animation. Offshore animation has led to the creating and nurturing of a local industry, as an infrastructure is built up, equipment is put into place, and skills are transferred.

Sample Pages

CURRENT STATE OF INDIAN ANIMATION INDUSTRY

There is a considerable increase in the 2D and 3D animation outsourcing to India. Due to the extremely competitive climate as well as the global slow-down, some of the large studios in the US have implemented large amounts of layoffs of animators and artists. India is slowly emerging as an alternative to Korea, Philippine and Taipei for animation outsourcing. India is also emerging as a post-production hub for animation. Post production involves a lot of ink, paint and compositing and scanning work, which is the labor intensive part of the entire process of animation and requires less skill. Thus we can see that the animation industry in India is following a similar evolutionary part as the software industry. In the early part of the evolution of the India software industry, it was the low value jobs which were shifted to India. Over time it is projected that more and more high value jobs would be outsourced to India. For low value post-production works, it is easier for a studio in the US to outsource its post production work as probably nothing is going to go wrong. India has one of the lowest labor rates, which makes it an attractive destination for animation outsourcing.

KEY TRENDS

Indian animation companies are moving up the value chain to own and co-produce intellectual property rights. This is a shift from the model of outsourcing animation production from international studios. The Indian animation companies are also focusing on strategic alliances with overseas studios with the eye to establish a presence in the global animation market. Content creation in the country has peaked and big Indian studios are increasingly making their presence felt in foreign markets. Indian studios are developing rapidly and a trend being witnessed is one of modularization of animation wherein expert from multiple animation companies, come together to execute specific functions in the production value chain. Some work on the design, storyboarding, layouts etc while others focus more on other elements of the process i.e. animation, texturing, lighting etc. These were models which had been perfected previously in mature animation countries such as Korea. This model is being increasingly adopted by Indian animation studios based on the ability of the studios to be process driven enough to distribute the work in modular units without loss of time or quality.

Indian animation companies are garnering larger chunks of the animation outsourcing pie and are also moving up the value chain by co-owning IPR, co-producing animation products for television or home videos or theatrical releases. Given the large domestic demand, India is also likely to evolve into a significant animation consumption country and the demand for local animation content is rising which is exemplified by the tremendous success of the first fully locally produced movies such as Hanuman, and TV shows such as Chhota Bheem etc. Plus there is the tremendous untapped market for merchandising. Popularity of channels such as Cartoon Network, Pogo, Nick etc. has resulted in more opportunities for studios in India. Indian cities such as Mumbai, Hyderabad and Bangalore are offering a state-of-the-art mix of software skills, production and animation expertise and studio infrastructure.

The demand for Indian animation production for export comes mainly from feature film producers and distributors, broadcasting channels, game software producers and advertisement film producers. As of now, Indian animation companies are working with a number of leading foreign studios.

BUSINESS MODELS

Indian Animation studios typically have four prominent business models. They are:

  • Outsourced animation services
  • Collaborative animation services
  • In-house production

OUTSOURCED ANIMATION SERVICES

Most of the Indian animation studios have adopted this business model. This is a low risk low return business model, with the studios doing low value added services such as post production services. In this business model, animation studios work on a time and material basis (payment based on actual expenses) or on a fixed payment basis (fixed fee for the project). Most of the outsourced animation jobs come from studios in the US, Canada and Europe. In this business model, the outsourcing firm has control over the quality of the output and they execute the pre-production and post production part of projects. Thus the labor intensive production works are outsourced. The partnership could be between animation studios in India and abroad, Indian animation studios and foreign TV channels/film producers, Indian animation studios and advertising firms etc. We are also seeing bigger studios in India winning large scale projects and in turn outsourcing some parts of the work to the smaller studios in India to specialist animation studios. Moreover in outsourced animation services, the Intellectual property of the job rests with the outsourcing firm.

COLLABORATIVE ANIMATION SERVICES

In this business model, there is a collaborative effort involving multiple animation studios based in India and abroad. The Intellectual property rights are shared by the firms and so are the revenues arising out of the content. Here firms with different core competencies come together to leverage each other's expertise. The partnership could be between animation studios in India and abroad or between Indian animation studios and foreign TV channels/film producers etc. These revenues could be from selling the content to channels and from royalty from the sale of animation character related products. Firms following this business model are building their capabilities towards producing in-house content.

IN-HOUSE PRODUCTION

In this business model, Indian animation studios create their own content in-house thereby owning the complete intellectual property rights to the content. This is a high risk-high return business model with the animation studio bearing the risk of the entire project. This is evident from the scale of investments required for a full length film (US $ 50-100 million). Most of the Indian players are not in a position to make such large scale investments. In India, more number of large animation studios shifting towards this business model. However no Indian studio has adopted this business model completely. This business model exists along with the previously mentioned models. More and more studios are attaching greater importance to the ownership of intellectual property rights to the content as they can not only generate revenues from content, but they can generate revenues from royalty payments from merchandising. This business model has high barriers to entry and is not easy for the small animation studios to adopt this business model. A number of Indian animation studios have adopted this business model.

Table of Contents

Introduction

  • Animation in Asian Societies
  • Establishment of Local Animation Industry
    • LOCAL CONTENT PRODUCTIONS
    • SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS MODELS
  • Drivers for Success
  • Models for Animation financing in Asia
  • Copyright Chain in Asia
  • Influence of Foreign Animation Styles
    • POPULARITY OF FOREIGN ANIMATION
  • Trends in Animation Production in Asia
    • ANIMATION PRODUCTION IN CHINA
    • ANIMATION PRODUCTION IN INDIA
    • ANIMATION PRODUCTION IN SOUTH KOREA
    • ANIMATION PRODUCTION IN PHILIPPINES
    • ANIMATION PRODUCTION IN TAIWAN
    • ANIMATION PRODUCTION IN VIETNAM
  • Animation Co-Productions in Asia
    • CO-PRODUCTIONS IN JAPAN
    • CO-PRODUCTIONS IN CHINA
    • CO-PRODUCTIONS IN KOREA
    • CO-PRODUCTIONS IN INDIA
    • CO-PRODUCTIONS IN TAIWAN
    • CO-PRODUCTIONS IN PHILIPPINES
    • CO-PRODUCTIONS IN SINGAPORE
    • CO-PRODUCTIONS IN MALAYSIA
  • Collaboration among Asian and Foreign Animation Studios
  • Controversies Surrounding Foreign Animation
    • PHILIPPINES
    • SINGAPORE
    • KOREA
    • MALAYSIA
    • INDONESIA
  • Animation Studios in Asia

India

  • Current State of the Industry
    • KEY TRENDS
    • CHALLENGES
  • Business Models of Animation Studies in India
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