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市場調查報告書

400G、OTN及下一代傳輸:市場、技術預測

400G, OTN and Next-Generation Transport: A Market and Technology Forecast

出版商 Communications Industry Researchers (CIR) 商品編碼 292878
出版日期 內容資訊 英文
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400G、OTN及下一代傳輸:市場、技術預測 400G, OTN and Next-Generation Transport: A Market and Technology Forecast
出版日期: 2014年01月15日 內容資訊: 英文
簡介

全球電信業者正擺脫100G傳輸網路,邁向400G主力。超高速網路,預計將帶給光學元件企業,矽晶片廠商及設備廠商一樣大的新商機。

本報告提供超級通道和最新調製方案等的創新評估、同調與拉曼技術所扮演的角色、包含從ITU到OIF的400G取向的新規格架構等,400G傳輸的機會分析及藍圖、下一代核心網路平台必要的重要功能辨識、各技術類型、網路的400G核心市場8年預測,為您概述為以下內容。

摘要整理

第1章 簡介

第2章 400G傳輸的賦能技術、規格分析

  • 400G傳輸環境的多重化,開關及路由的選項
  • 400G環境中調製的新方向性
  • 400G主力的拉曼技術
  • 400Gbps同調技術:過去與未來
  • 規格

第3章 400G取向的設備供應商策略

第4章 8年預測

  • 預測手法
  • 400G傳輸設備的8年預測:核心分析
  • 400G設備的8年預測:網路的各類型分析
  • 引進400G用光學元件的8年預測
  • 預計提供的400Gbps服務

縮寫、簡稱

關於作者

圖表清單

目錄
Product Code: CIR-400GOTN-0114

Carriers worldwide are outgrowing 100 G transport networks and taking first steps towards 400 G backbones. CIR believes these ultra-fast networks will create major new revenue opportunities for optical components firms, silicon chipmakers and equipment companies alike. This new business will come from volume deployments of 400G networks themselves. It will also emerge from radical new directions in modulation, amplification, and multiplexing technology that will create openings for companies with novel WDM/OTN platforms of all kinds.

Many questions remain. How many carriers will jump to 400 G immediately? Which ones will be satisfied with 200 G cores for a few years, before shifting to 400 G transport networks? Which enabling technologies are available and will be deployed by equipment firms to make 400 G possible? And how will these equipment suppliers design their next-generation routers and switches to make them 400 G ready?

The answers to these questions will shape where and how the money will be made in the next few years in optical transport business. In this new CIR report we provide these answers, drawing on the evidence that is emerging from the slew of recent 400 G trials, as well as the plans by the leading systems firms.

This report provides a complete opportunity analysis and roadmap for 400 G transport, including an assessment of innovations such as superchannels and the latest modulation schemes, and the role of coherent and Raman technology, as well as the emerging standards framework for 400 G from the ITU and OIF. Based on this analysis, we identify the key capabilities that will be needed in next generation core network platforms and how they are most likely to be provided. The report also includes a granular eight-year forecast of the 400 G core market with breakouts by type of technology and network segment.

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

  • E.1 Three Factors Driving 400G Backbones: Bandwidth Hunger, Applications and the 100G Paradigm
    • E.1.1 Mobile Broadband: A New Paradigm for Network Traffic
  • E.2 Opportunities Created in the Transport Layer: The Need for Intelligence at Every Level
    • E.2.1 Role of Software Defined Networks: A Key Enabling Technology?
    • E.2.2 Danger of Market Overshoot
  • E.3 Component Level Opportunities
    • E.3.1 The Growing Power of DSP and Waveform Engineering
    • E.3.2 Proprietary Network Processors in a 400G Environment
    • E.3.3 Integration and Opportunities for Optical Components Firms at 400G
  • E.4 The Optical Networking Equipment Perspective on 400G
    • E.4.1 Four Factors That Will Shape the 400G Optical Platform Market
    • E.4.2 Five Firms that will Shape the 400G Transport Space
  • E.5 Summary of Eight-Year Forecasts of 400G Transport Markets

Chapter One: Introduction

  • 1.1 Background to this Report: Outstanding Questions About 400G Transport Deployment
    • 1.1.1 Trials and Addressable Markets for 400G Transport Aren't the Same Thing
    • 1.1.2 Service and Standards Environments Add More Uncertainties for 400G Transport
    • 1.1.3 Equipment and Components Firms: Together Again at 400G?
  • 1.2 Objective and Scope of this Report
  • 1.3 Methodology of this Report
  • 1.4 Plan of this Report

Chapter Two: Analysis of Enabling Technologies and Standards for 400G Transport

  • 2.1 Multiplexing, Switching and Routing Options in the 400G Transport Environment
    • 2.1.1 OTN Boxes, Routers and Optical Packet Switching in 400G Network
    • 2.1.2 Differing Visions of 400G: Sometimes 400G is 200G and Sometimes It is 500G
    • 2.1.3 WDM, Superchannels and Bandwidth Allocation
    • 2.1.4 A Role for Space Division at 400 Gbps?
  • 2.2 New Directions for Modulation in the 400G Environment
    • 2.2.1 DPSK, QPSK, BPSK and PM-QSP
    • 2.2.2 DP-16 QAM and Beyond
  • 2.3 Raman Technology in 400G Backbones
  • 2.4 400 Gbps Coherent Technology: the Once and Future
  • 2.5 Standards
    • 2.5.1 ITU-T, OTN at 400 Gbps
    • 2.5.2 Optical Internetworking Forum (OIF)
    • 2.5.3 IETF
    • 2.5.4 Relevance of the Emerging 400 Gigabit Ethernet Standard for Carriers

Chapter Three: Equipment Vendor Strategies for 400G

  • 3.1 Alcatel-Lucent (France/United States)
    • 3.1.1 Photonic Service Switch (PSS)
    • 3.1.2 Photonic Service Engine (PSE)
    • 3.1.3 FP3 400G Chip
    • 3.1.4 Wavelength Tracker
    • 3.1.5 Nextgen (Australia)
    • 3.1.6 Orange-France Telecom/RENATER (France)
    • 3.1.7 SaskTel (Canada)
    • 3.1.8 Shaw Communications (Canada)
    • 3.1.9 Telefónica España (Spain)
    • 3.1.10 Zain (Saudi Arabia)
  • 3.2 Ciena (United States)
    • 3.2.1 WaveLogic 3
    • 3.2.2 Ciena 6500
    • 3.2.3 BT (United Kingdom)
    • 3.2.4 Sprint (United States)
    • 3.2.5 Comcast (United States)
    • 3.2.6 Verizon (United States)
  • 3.3 Cisco (United States)
    • 3.3.1 NCS Platform
    • 3.3.2 nPower X1 Network Processor
  • 3.4 Coriant (Germany)
    • 3.4.1 FlexiGrid ROADM nodes
    • 3.4.2 hiT 7100 and 7300
    • 3.4.3 Netia (Poland)
    • 3.4.4 Telekom Austria - A1 (Austria)
  • 3.5 Cyan (United States)
    • 3.5.1 GlobalConnect (Denmark)
  • 3.6 Ericsson (Sweden)
    • 3.6.1 MHL 3000 Platform
    • 3.6.2 SPO 1410 Platform
    • 3.6.3 Smart Service Routers 8000
    • 3.6.4 Telefónica España (Spain)
  • 3.7 Fujitsu and NEC (Japan)
    • 3.7.1 NTT (Japan)
    • 3.7.2 Verizon (United States)
  • 3.8 Huawei (China)
    • 3.8.1 NE5000E Router
    • 3.8.2 WDM Transport Solutions
    • 3.8.3 EXATEL (Poland)
    • 3.8.4 Jazztel (Spain)
    • 3.8.5 KPN International (Netherlands)
    • 3.8.6 Mobily (Saudi Arabia)
    • 3.8.7 True (Thailand)
    • 3.8.8 Telefonica Chile (Chile)
    • 3.8.9 400G Photonics Integration Program
  • 3.9 Infinera (United States)
    • 3.9.1 DTN-X
    • 3.9.2 DANTE (Europe)
    • 3.9.3 TeliaSonera (Sweden/Finland)
    • 3.9.4 Zayo (International)
  • 3.10 Juniper (United States)
  • 3.11 TE SubCom (United States)
  • 3.12 Xtera (United States)
  • 3.13 ZTE (China)
    • 3.13.1 Recent 400G Trial
    • 3.13.1 Deutsche Telekom (Germany)

Chapter Four: Eight-Year Forecasts

  • 4.1 Forecasting Methodology
    • 4.1.1 Assumptions About Network Requirements and Sources of Information
    • 4.1.2 Getting to Market in a Hurry: 400G Backbones without Standards
    • 4.1.3 Assumptions about Technology Evolution
  • 4.2 Eight-Year Forecast of 400G Transport Equipment: Core Analysis
  • 4.3 Eight-Year Forecast of 400G Equipment: Breakout by Type of Network
  • 4.4 Eight-Year Forecast of Optical Components for 400G Deployment
  • 4.5 Possible 400 Gbps Service Offerings

Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report

About the Author

List of Exhibits

  • Exhibit E-1: Eight-Year Forecast of 400G Transport Equipment: Core Analysis
  • Exhibit 2-1: Goals of the 400 Gbps Ethernet Study Group
  • Exhibit 4-1: Eight-Year Forecast of 400G Transport Equipment: Core Analysis
  • Exhibit 4-2: Eight-Year Forecast of 400G Equipment: Breakout by Type of Network
  • Exhibit 4-3: Eight-Year Forecast of Optical Components for 400G Deployment ($ Millions)
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