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市場調查報告書

醫療設備製造商各種演講計劃和對醫生的終身教育 (CME:Continuing Medical Education)

Medical Device Speaker Programs And Continuing Medical Education

出版商 Cutting Edge Information 商品編碼 361714
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 66 Pages
商品交期: 最快1-2個工作天內
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醫療設備製造商各種演講計劃和對醫生的終身教育 (CME:Continuing Medical Education) Medical Device Speaker Programs And Continuing Medical Education
出版日期: 2016年06月30日 內容資訊: 英文 66 Pages
簡介

促銷目的及教育目的演講節目是醫療設備製造商的成功所不可缺的要素。

本報告提供醫療設備製造商各種演講計劃的實施策略的相關調查,負責團隊的組織結構,促銷用計劃及教育用節目的演講者的選擇、合作要求、報酬,實施策略,對計劃的有效性的評估,財源和人的資源,醫生的終身教育 (CME:Continuing Medical Education) 的措施等趨勢彙整。

摘要整理

隊伍的構成與演講者的採用,建立理想的演講計劃

  • 為了活躍活動的演講計劃隊結構
  • 作為促銷用計劃、教育用節目的演講者,獲得來自著名醫生的合作

演講活動的實施和計劃的有效性的檢測

  • 為了使演講計劃成功的策略性計劃
  • 為了解除產業課題的演講計劃的有效性的評估

透過有競爭力的報酬與最高層級意見領袖的合作

  • 對演講者的報酬相關必要條件和企業政策

充分的財源與人力資源的演講計劃

  • 為了推動演講計劃的充足專用的資金
  • 支援演講計劃隊的各種作用

對醫生的終身教育 (CME:Continuing Medical Education)

  • 醫療社群對知識為基礎擴大的貢獻
目錄
Product Code: PH235

Speaker programs - including both promotional programs and educational programs such as continuing medical education (CME) - are an integral part of any successful device company. Speakers help promote the product and train healthcare providers on how to use it. Educational speaker programs can also help raise awareness for a disease state and ultimately spread scientific and medical knowledge from research that a company has performed. However, device companies must carefully plan and utilize strategy to make the most of the programs they conduct. These strategies are even more important now as the industry faces challenging changes in both legislation and the culture of the healthcare industry itself.

One of the largest challenges is the implementation of the Physician Payment Sunshine Act in the US. This legislation has caused ripples of anxiety among speakers worldwide who do not want to appear to be in any device maker's pocket - especially since that is not usually the case. Speaker program teams are not only aware that KOLs are more hesitant to speak as a result of this legislation, but they also do not want payments to reflect poorly on the company itself.

In response, many device companies have begun to decrease or even cease promotional programs. Others simply take a different approach by adjusting their content, compensation or recruitment and training accordingly. Still others have begun to focus more on the educational side of speaker programs.

Many companies are leveraging new technologies for their speaker programs. Webinars, for example, reach audiences easier. They also avoid the substantial payments that must be made to KOLs who represent a company's product at multiple programs.

Of course, pulling speaker programs away from marketing and promotion has the unfortunate side effect of handicapping speaker program teams' ability to prove value and ROI to upper management. Those that do work in promotion can tie programs to sales, but educational speaker program and CME teams must use softer metrics more, such as physician feedback and message uptake. If one cannot obtain sufficient funding, however, teams must pull from other sources. They will receive support cross-functionally by other departments that are involved with speaker programs. They can use vendors and in-house FTEs ad hoc for projects.

Although speaker programs may not always be as popular among the medical community as a whole, they remain a necessary way to disseminate messages of both a promotional and educational nature.

USE OF THIS REPORT

This report examines device companies' speaker programs teams, detailing the structures, budgets and variety of strategies that companies can leverage to create optimal speaker program and CME events. The structure for the report is as follows:

CHAPTER 1: BUILDING THE IDEAL SPEAKER PROGRAM THROUGH TEAM STRUCTURE AND SPEAKER RECRUITMENT

This chapter focuses on building speaker program teams and speaker bureaus at surveyed medical device companies. The structure of the speaker program function is heavily influenced by the company size, and in turn affects the responsibilities assigned to each level. One such responsibility is speaker selection, recruitment and training - several strategies for which are explored in the second half of the chapter.

CHAPTER 2: CONDUCTING SPEAKING EVENTS AND MEASURING PROGRAM EFFECTIVENESS TO MITIGATE CHALLENGES

This chapter outlines the ground-level responsibilities and challenges of conducting speaker programs, as well as the effectiveness of different types of events and the time of day during which they take place. Speaker program attendance and cost per attendee are also covered to help medical device companies benchmark their own practices against competitors.

CHAPTER 3: PARTNERING WITH TOP-TIER THOUGHT LEADERS THROUGH COMPETITIVE COMPENSATION

This chapter covers the compensation practices that companies follow for the speakers that they hire. It includes minimum, maximum and average rates, for both companies that pay a flat fee and those that pay by the hour. Surveyed medical device companies also provide annual caps for payment, if they do cap payments to speakers.

CHAPTER 4: EQUIPPING SPEAKER PROGRAMS WITH ADEQUATE FINANCIAL AND STAFFING RESOURCES

This chapter explores speaker program resource allocation. Not only are budget numbers and sources provided, but this chapter also explores budget dissemination across speaker program activities and regions, as well as how budgets have changed over time. Number of FTEs and their position within the speaker program function are also given.

CHAPTER 5: CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION: CONTRIBUTING TO THE MEDICAL COMMUNITY'S GROWING KNOWLEDGE BASE

This chapter contains a profile for a team at a small company that conducts programs for continuing medical education (CME). Investing in CME can help a company not only promote disease awareness for therapeutic areas in which they are involved, but also maintain relationships with physicians and KOLs. The profile outlines the structure, strategy and trends that one surveyed CME team experiences.

Table of Contents

  • 9 Study Methodology
  • 10 Study Definitions
  • 11 Building the Ideal Speaker Program Through Team Structure and Speaker Recruitment
  • 12 Structuring Speaker Program Teams to Manage High Volumes of Activities
  • 17 Enlisting Key Physicians as Promotional and Educational Speakers
  • 22 Conducting Speaking Events and Measuring Program Effectiveness to Mitigate Challenges
  • 23 EnsurING Ground-Level Speaker Program Activities Are Strategically Planned to Bring Success
  • 37 Assessing Speaker Program Effectiveness to Overcome Industry Challenges
  • 42 Partnering with Top-Tier Thought Leaders Through Competitive Compensation
  • 43 Considering Engagement Requirements and Company Policies to Compensate Speakers
  • 53 Equipping Speaker Programs with Adequate Financial and Staffing Resources
  • 54 Dedicating Substantial Funding to Drive Speaker Programs
  • 60 Filling Varying Roles to Support Speaker Program Teams
  • 63 Continuing Medical Education: Contributing to the Medical Community's Growing Knowledge Base
  • 9 Study Methodology
  • 10 Study Definitions
  • 11 Building the Ideal Speaker Program Through Team Structure and Speaker Recruitment
  • 12 Figure 1.1: Percentage of Company's Total Speaker Programs
  • 12 Structuring Speaker Program Teams to Manage High Volumes of Activities
  • 13 Figure 1.2: Structure of Speaker Program Teams
  • 14 Figure 1.3: Functions Involved in Speaker Program Activities
  • 14 Figure 1.4: Activities the Speaker Program Team Oversees
  • 15 Figure 1.5: Total Speaker Events Conducted Annually
  • 16 Figure 1.6: Percentage of Speaker Programs Conducted, by Format: US
  • 17 Enlisting Key Physicians as Promotional and Educational Speakers
  • 18 Figure 1.7: Number of Speakers within Speaker Bureau
  • 18 Figure 1.8: Credentials of Speakers Hired
  • 19 Figure 1.9: Preferred Speaker Background
  • 19 Figure 1.10: Impression of Speakers Speaking for More Than One Company
  • 20 Figure 1.11: Average Perceived Effectiveness of Speaker Recruitment Tools
  • 21 Figure 1.12: Hours of Training Provided to Speakers Before They Are Allowed to Present
  • 21 Figure 1.13: Speaker Compensation for Training
  • 22 Conducting Speaking Events and Measuring Program Effectiveness to Mitigate Challenges
  • 23 Ensuring Ground-Level Speaker Program Activities Are Strategically Planned to Bring Success
  • 24 Figure 2.1: Percentage of Companies Utilizing Specific Types of Speaker Program
  • 25 Figure 2.2: Typical Attendance of Speaker Programs
  • 26 Figure 2.3: Typical Attendance of Speaker Programs: Urban Setting
  • 27 Figure 2.4: Typical Attendance of Speaker Programs: Suburban Setting
  • 27 Figure 2.5: Typical Attendance of Speaker Programs: Rural Setting
  • 28 Figure 2.6: Average Cost per Speaker Program Attendee
  • 29 Figure 2.7: Upper Limit of Company Cost per Attendee
  • 30 Figure 2.8: Average Cost of Speaker Programs: Urban Setting
  • 31 Figure 2.9: Average Cost of Speaker Programs: Suburban Setting
  • 31 Figure 2.10: Average Cost of Speaker Programs: Rural Setting
  • 32 Figure 2.11: Typical Duration of Speaker Programs, by Type
  • 33 Figure 2.12: Best Time of Day to Conduct Speaker Programs, by Type
  • 33 Figure 2.13: Worst Time of Day to Conduct Speaker Programs, by Type
  • 34 Figure 2.14: Typical Preparation Time for Speaker Programs, in Hours
  • 35 Figure 2.15: Lifecycle Stage when Speaker Programs Begin to Support Product
  • 36 Figure 2.16: Lifecycle Stage when Speaker Programs Are Most Effective
  • 37 Assessing Speaker Program Effectiveness to Overcome Industry Challenges
  • 38 Figure 2.17: Rating of Effectiveness and Satisfaction with Company's Overall Speaker Program Initiative
  • 38 Figure 2.18: Average Perceived Effectiveness of Speaker Programs at Companies 9 Through 15
  • 39 Figure 2.19: Perceived Effectiveness of Speaker Programs Now as Compared to Five Years Ago
  • 41 Figure 2.20: Ratings of Speaker Program Challenges: Companies 1 Through 7
  • 41 Figure 2.21: Ratings of Speaker Program Challenges: Companies 8 Through 14
  • 42 Partnering with Top-Tier Thought Leaders Through Competitive Compensation
  • 43 Considering Engagement Requirements and Company Policies to Compensate Speakers
  • 43 Figure 3.1: Means of Compensating Speakers
  • 44 Figure 3.2: Minimum and Maximum Allowed Compensation for Speakers Paid a Flat Fee
  • 46 Figure 3.3: Typical Flat Fee for Speaker Compensation
  • 47 Figure 3.4: Compensation for Speakers Paid an Hourly Rate
  • 48 Figure 3.5: Percentage of Companies that Include Travel Costs in Speaker Compensation
  • 49 Figure 3.6: Typical Compensation for Travel
  • 51 Figure 3.7: Percentage of Companies with an Annual Cap for Compensation to an Individual Speaker
  • 51 Figure 3.8: Maximum Annual Payment Allowed for a Single Speaker
  • 52 Figure 3.9: Functions to Which the Annual Cap Applies
  • 53 Equipping Speaker Programs with Adequate Financial and Staffing Resources
  • 54 Figure 4.1: Overall Speaker Program Budget, by Company
  • 54 Dedicating Substantial Funding to Drive Speaker Programs
  • 56 Figure 4.2: Regional Allocation of Speaker Program Budget
  • 57 Figure 4.3: Percentage of Budget Outsourced
  • 58 Figure 4.4: Functions that Contribute to Speaker Programs
  • 59 Figure 4.5: Percentage of Speaker Program Budget Accounted for by Each Function
  • 60 Filling Varying Roles to Support Speaker Program Teams
  • 61 Figure 4.6: Placement of Speaker Program FTEs on Team
  • 62 Figure 4.7: Number of FTEs Involved with Speaker Programs at Different Levels
  • 63 Continuing Medical Education: Contributing to the Medical Community's Growing Knowledge Base
  • 65 Figure 5.1: Company 15: Structure and Organization
  • 66 Figure 5.2: Company 15: Resources and Activities
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