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市場調查報告書

醫藥品的中心客戶管理 (KAM) :建立與外部相關利益者統一的關係性

Pharmaceutical Key Account Management: Forging a Unified Relationship with External Stakeholders

出版商 Cutting Edge Information 商品編碼 355305
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 218 Pages
商品交期: 最快1-2個工作天內
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醫藥品的中心客戶管理 (KAM) :建立與外部相關利益者統一的關係性 Pharmaceutical Key Account Management: Forging a Unified Relationship with External Stakeholders
出版日期: 2016年02月16日 內容資訊: 英文 218 Pages
簡介

本報告提供製藥公司的中心客戶管理 (KAM) 計劃的開發的相關調查,成功的五個建議相關彙整。

摘要整理

中心客戶管理 (KAM) :邁向成功的5個建議

對應多樣相關利益者需求的中心客戶管理 (KAM) 團隊的建立和資源配置

  • 組織中的中心客戶管理 (KAM) 團隊的定位
  • 中心客戶管理 (KAM) 團隊的資源配置

關鍵業務經理的僱用、訓練及落實

  • 為了維持主要相關利益者的關係採用最適合的人力資源
  • 讓新人、老手的關鍵業務經理適合客戶需求的訓練
  • 為了維持重要的人力資源要確立關鍵業務經理

為了強化中心客戶 (關鍵帳號) 的關係,並使KAM的組合多樣化,有效利用整體、聚焦的KAM群組

中心客戶的關係的建立及公司內部業務

  • 醫療費付款者、醫院系統的客戶需求的應對
  • 對中心客戶管理 (KAM) 團隊來說的公司內部業務

中心客戶管理 (KAM) 團隊簡介

圖表

目錄
Product Code: PH218

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Life science companies are constantly looking to improve their communication with products' stakeholders and to maximize their revenue. In the past, these firms turned to sales representatives tasked with calling on physicians and specialists either in private practices or hospital settings. However, as a result of the US's Physician Payment Sunshine Act - and similar legislation emerging in other markets - many physicians are closing their doors to the traditional pharmaceutical sales rep. In addition to changing regulations, new stakeholders within the healthcare system - insurers, government institutions, pharmacists and nurses - now hold more influence over prescribing decisions than ever before. While sales reps are far from obsolete, many companies are beginning to look to key account management (KAM) teams to build strong relationships with commercial stakeholders.

Key account management strategy is rising in popularity as a way for pharmaceutical and device firms to drive product uptake. These KAM forces look beyond physicians to call on a number of healthcare decision makers, including nurses, pharmacists and payers. To be successful, KAMs draw upon a number of skills and talents. They must:

  • Have a breadth of knowledge that outpaces the traditional sales rep's.
  • Be able to interact and coordinate efforts with health economics, market access and sales teams.
  • Be able to develop and drive meaningful relationships with their targets, understanding what their company can do to meet their accounts' individual and evolving needs.

This report provides insight on how pharmaceutical firms are developing KAM programs. Many companies create broad-focused KAM groups under either sales or market access umbrellas. Companies should allocate the appropriate resources - both budgets and well-trained, knowledgeable FTEs - to best serve key accounts. Key accounts range from government and private payers to large physician networks and accountable care organizations. Finally, organizations should define key account management responsibilities as well as KAMs' ongoing interactions with other internal teams, including traditional sales reps and managed markets account managers.

KEY ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT: FIVE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SUCCESS

Cutting Edge Information analysts synthesized the following five key recommendations from the full breadth and depth of this project's research. These principles are signposts to help improve your key account management (KAM) teams and strategies. These points emphasize this study's central and most critical concepts.

RECRUIT KEY ACCOUNT MANAGERS FROM TOP-PERFORMING SALES REPS

Key account management is a relatively new concept in the pharmaceutical industry. Many companies have only begun implementing these KAM teams in the past five years. As such, firms are not afforded a wide array of experienced candidates. Instead, hiring managers must be able to recognize translational skills in candidates. These key skills include the capacity to understand big-picture commercial strategy and the ability to recognize client needs and translate them to profitable opportunities. Often, pharmaceutical companies look for experienced field reps - either sales reps, medical science liaisons (MSLs), health outcomes liaisons (HOLs) or managed care liaisons (MCLs) - to fill these positions.

Surveyed pharmaceutical firms were asked to rate specific professional backgrounds for KAMs by preference, shown in Figure E.1. For these data, a rating of 1 is the most preferred background and 7 is the least preferred. The majority of surveyed companies rank candidates with sales rep backgrounds as the best-fit for key account manager roles. Middle East- and Africa-based groups unanimously rank sales rep the most preferred background, at an average 1 out of 7. EU-based groups rank sales reps 1.20 out of 7. Surveyed US and Latin American groups also rank sales reps the best-fit background, at an average 2.17 and 2.67, respectively. Compared to EU and EMEA groups surveyed, US and Latin American teams prefer more variety among their candidates.

The second most-preferred background among surveyed companies is MSLs. Average rankings range from 2.67 out of 7 at Latin American teams to 3.40 at EU-based teams. Like sales reps, these candidates are experienced in working with companies' stakeholders to meet their needs and forge long-term relationships. HOLs and MCLs follow. These candidates also have experience working with multiple stakeholder accounts.

RESOURCE TEAMS TO PROVIDE COMPETITIVE COMPENSATION FOR KEY ACCOUNT MANAGERS

KAM teams support a number of customers and stakeholders. To meet a variety of needs, these groups take on a number of activities. They require sufficient budgets to drive customer-focused initiatives, as well as meet other expenses - including compensation, training, travel and tools.

For many surveyed firms, key account management compensation is a major driver of KAM team expenses (Figure E.2). Because experienced pharmaceutical KAMs are difficult to find, teams offer competitive salaries and bonuses to retain their account managers. At US-based general teams, KAM compensation claims an average 28% of budgets. For surveyed Latin America groups and Middle East or Africa-based groups, these percentages increase to an average 38% and 48%, respectively. EU teams surveyed report the highest average, with 58% of budgets going toward KAM compensation.

Travel expenses claim the second largest allocation of surveyed teams' average budgets. Because much of KAMs' responsibilities require face-to-face interactions with their stakeholders, teams must resource this activity. Among surveyed groups, average travel allocations range from 15% at US and Latin American teams to 17% at EU, Middle East and Africa groups. Teams must also allocate adequate budgets to training. These allocations range from an average 5% (EU teams) to 15% (Middle East and Africa teams).

CONSIDER MARKET SHARE AND POTENTIAL SALES TO DEFINE KEY ACCOUNTS

As pharmaceutical companies define the scope of responsibility for KAM teams, they should also define key accounts. This process of determining which of their external contacts require key account managers can be daunting. Companies consider a number of factors to define their key accounts, including each account's market share and sales potential.

Surveyed life science companies were asked to rate specific factors used to determine key account designations in order of importance. For these data, surveyed companies ranked factors on a scale from 1 to 6, in which 1 is the most important. General KAM teams surveyed rank market share and sales potential as most important, at an average 2.18 out of 6. Surveyed KAM groups also look at account leadership's level of formulary control (2.76) and the range of specialties treated (3.06). The least important factors are current account relationships and account complexity, at an average 4.29 and 4.94, respectively.

DESIGN KEY ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT ROLES TO INCLUDE SIGNIFICANT PLANNING AND COORDINATION

KAMs' main targets are typically C-suite executives or other high-level managers who are responsible for making strategic decisions for their companies. As a result, KAMs need to be able to access a wide range of information on accounts. They also should take the time before visits to ensure that meetings are tailored to maximize their faceto- face time with key executives. Successful KAM groups account for the amount of information required and ensure that the role is designed to allow for extensive preparation before meetings.

LOOK TO INVOLVE KEY ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT GROUPS IN SHAPING ACCOUNT ENGAGEMENT STRATEGIES

A large part of the KAM role is interfacing directly with accounts to address their needs and then disseminating important information within the organization. However, successful KAM groups also work with other field forces - ranging from sales reps to HOLs - to provide an overall strategy to the account. In fact, many surveyed companies see the ideal KAM involvement in the strategic role.

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Key Account Management: Five Recommendations for Success

Structuring and Resourcing Key Account Management Teams to Meet Diverse Stakeholder Needs

  • Positioning Key Account Management Teams Within the Organization
  • Resourcing Key Account Management Teams

Hiring, Training and Compensating Key Account Managers

  • Recruiting Best-Fit Personnel to Maintain Key Stakeholder Relationships
  • Training New Hire and Veteran KAMs to Best Meet Customer Needs
  • Compensating Key Account Managers to Retain Top Talent

Leverage General and Targeted KAM Groups to Bolster Key Account Relationships and Diversify KAM Portfolios

Building Key Account Relationships And Internal Operations

  • Meeting Account Needs at Payer and Hospital Systems
  • Internal Operations for Key Account Management Teams

Key Account Management Team Profiles

Executive Summary

Key Account Management: Five Recommendations for Success

  • Figure E.1: Best Professional Background for Key Account Managers: General Groups
  • Figure E.2: Average Percentage of Total KAM Resources Allocated to Specific Activities
  • Figure E.3: Importance of Specific Factors in Determining Key Account Designation: General Groups
  • Figure E.4: Percentage of KAMs' Time Dedicated to Specific Activities: Targeted Groups
  • Figure E.5: Percentage of KAM Groups Currently and Ideally Involved in Shaping Overall Strategy for Approaching Accounts, by Field Force

Structuring and Resourcing Key Account Management Teams to Meet Diverse Stakeholder Needs

Positioning Key Account Management Teams Within The Organization

  • Figure 1.1: Age of Key Account Management Team: General Groups, US
  • Figure 1.2: Age of Key Account Management Team: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 1.3: Age of Key Account Management Team: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 1.4: Age of Key Account Management Team: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 1.5: Department with Functional Oversight of Key Account Management Teams: General Groups
  • Figure 1.6: Executive with Direct Oversight of KAM Team: General Groups
  • Figure 1.7: Executive with Ultimate Oversight of KAM Team: General Groups
  • Figure 1.8: Executive with Direct Oversight of KAM Team: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 1.9: Executive with Ultimate Oversight of KAM Team: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 1.10: Key Account Management Team Staffing: General Groups, US
  • Figure 1.11: Key Account Management Team Staffing: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 1.12: Key Account Management Team Staffing: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 1.13: Key Account Management Team Staffing: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 1.14: Key Account Management Team Staffing Changes: General Groups, US
  • Figure 1.15: Key Account Management Team Staffing Changes: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 1.16: Key Account Management Team Staffing Changes: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 1.17: Key Account Management Team Staffing Changes: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 1.18: Impact of Specific Factors on Key Account Management Team Staffing: General Groups
  • Figure 1.19: Structural Changes Due to Fluctuating Key Account Management Headcount: General Groups
  • Figure 1.20: Ratio of KAMs to Field Managers: General Groups, US
  • Figure 1.21: Ratio of KAMs to Field Managers: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 1.22: Ratio of KAMs to Field Managers: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 1.23: Ratio of KAMs to Field Managers: Targeted Groups

Resourcing Key Account Management Teams

  • Figure 1.24: Total Annual KAM Team Resources: General Groups, US and EU
  • Figure 1.25: Total Annual KAM Team Resources: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 1.26: Total Annual KAM Team Resources: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 1.27: Average Annual Cost per KAM: General Groups, US and EU
  • Figure 1.28: Average Annual Cost per KAM: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 1.29: Average Annual Cost per KAM: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 1.30: Percentage of Total KAM Resources Allocated to Specific Activities: General Groups, US
  • Figure 1.31: Percentage of Total KAM Resources Allocated to Specific Activities: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 1.32: Percentage of Total KAM Resources Allocated to Specific Activities: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 1.33: Percentage of Total KAM Resources Allocated to Specific Activities: Targeted Groups

Hiring, Training and Compensating Key Account Managers

Recruiting Best-Fit Personnel to Maintain Key Stakeholder Relationships

  • Figure 2.1: Best Professional Background for Key Account Managers: General Groups
  • Figure 2.2: Best Professional Background for Key Account Managers: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 2.3: Percentage of KAM Force with Specific Professional Backgrounds: General Groups, US
  • Figure 2.4: Percentage of KAM Force with Specific Professional Backgrounds: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 2.5: Percentage of KAM Force with Specific Professional Backgrounds: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 2.6: Percentage of KAM Force with Specific Professional Backgrounds: Targeted Groups

Training New Hire and Veteran KAMs to Best Meet Customer Needs

  • Figure 2.7: Hours of Training for New Key Account Managers: General Groups, US
  • Figure 2.8: Hours of Training for New Key Account Managers: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 2.9: Hours of Training for New Key Account Managers: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 2.10: Hours of Training for New Key Account Managers: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 2.11: Hours of Annual Training for Veteran Key Account Managers: General Groups, US
  • Figure 2.12: Hours of Annual Training for Veteran Key Account Managers: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 2.13: Hours of Annual Training for Veteran Key Account Managers: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 2.14: Hours of Annual Training for Veteran Key Account Managers: Targeted Groups

Compensating Key Account Managers to Retain Top Talent

  • Figure 2.15: Annual KAM Compensation for General Teams: No Experience
  • Figure 2.16: Annual KAM Compensation for General Teams: 2-4 Years of Experience
  • Figure 2.17: Annual KAM Compensation for General Teams: 4-6 Years of Experience
  • Figure 2.18: Annual KAM Compensation for General Teams: 6-8 Years of Experience
  • Figure 2.19: Annual KAM Compensation for General Teams: 8-10 Years of Experience
  • Figure 2.20: Annual KAM Compensation for General Teams: 10 or More Years of Experience
  • Figure 2.21: Annual KAM Compensation for Targeted Teams: No Experience
  • Figure 2.22: Annual KAM Compensation for Targeted Teams: 2-4 Years of Experience
  • Figure 2.23: Annual KAM Compensation for Targeted Teams: 4-6 Years of Experience
  • Figure 2.24: Annual KAM Compensation for Targeted Teams: 6-8 Years of Experience
  • Figure 2.25: Annual KAM Compensation for Targeted Teams: 8-10 Years of Experience
  • Figure 2.26: Annual KAM Compensation for Targeted Teams: 10 or More Years of Experience

Leverage General and Targeted KAM Groups to Bolster Key Account Relationships and Diversify KAM Portfolios

  • Figure 3.1: Number of Products Supported by KAM Team: General Groups, US
  • Figure 3.2: Number of Products Supported by KAM Team: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 3.3: Number of Products Supported by KAM Team: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 3.4: Number of Products Supported by KAM Team: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 3.5: Number of Key Accounts Supported: General Groups, US
  • Figure 3.6: Number of Key Accounts Supported: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 3.7: Number of Key Accounts Supported: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 3.8: Number of Key Accounts Supported: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 3.9: Average Number of Key Accounts per KAM: General Groups, US
  • Figure 3.10: Average Number of Key Accounts per KAM: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 3.11: Average Number of Key Accounts per KAM: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 3.12: Average Number of Key Accounts per KAM: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 3.13: Types of Accounts Supported by KAM Teams: General Groups
  • Figure 3.14: Types of Accounts Supported by KAM Teams: General Groups, US
  • Figure 3.15: Types of Accounts Supported by KAM Teams: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 3.16: Types of Accounts Supported by KAM Teams: General Groups, Middle East/ Africa
  • Figure 3.17: Types of Accounts Supported by KAM Teams: General Groups, Latin America
  • Figure 3.18: Key Account Portfolio Composition: General Groups, US
  • Figure 3.19: Key Account Portfolio Composition: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 3.20: Key Account Portfolio Composition: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 3.21: Types of Accounts Supported by KAM Teams: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 3.22: Key Account Portfolio Composition: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 3.23: Importance of Specific Factors in Determining Key Account Designation: General Groups
  • Figure 3.24: Importance of Specific Factors in Determining Key Account Designation: General Groups, US
  • Figure 3.25: Importance of Specific Factors in Determining Key Account Designation: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 3.26: Importance of Specific Factors in Determining Key Account Designation: General Groups, Middle East/Africa
  • Figure 3.27: Importance of Specific Factors in Determining Key Account Designation: General Groups, Latin America
  • Figure 3.28: Importance of Specific Factors in Determining Key Account Designation: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 3.29: Frequency of Key Account Review and Revisions: General Groups, US
  • Figure 3.30: Frequency of Key Account Review and Revisions: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 3.31: Frequency of Key Account Review and Revisions: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 3.32: Level of Executive with Final Say of Key Account Status: General Groups
  • Figure 3.33: Frequency of Key Account Review and Revisions: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 3.34: Level of Executive with Final Say of Key Account Status: Targeted Groups

Building Key Account Relationships and Internal Operations

Meeting Account Needs at Payer and Hospital Systems

  • Figure 4.1: Average Number of Visits per Quarter to Specific Key Accounts, by Type: General Groups, US and EU
  • Figure 4.2: Average Number of Visits per Quarter to Specific Key Accounts, by Type: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 4.3: Average Number of Visits per Quarter to Specific Key Accounts, by Type: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.4: Tiering of Specific KAM Hospital System Targets: General Groups
  • Figure 4.5: Tiering of Specific KAM Hospital System Targets: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.6: Number of Visits per Quarter to Top Targets, Hospital Systems: General Groups, US
  • Figure 4.7: Number of Visits per Quarter to Top Targets, Hospital Systems: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 4.8: Number of Visits per Quarter to Top Targets, Hospital Systems: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 4.9: Number of Visits per Quarter to Top Targets, Hospital Systems: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.10: Tiering of Specific KAM Government and Private Payer Organization Targets: General Groups
  • Figure 4.11: Tiering of Specific KAM Government and Private Payer Organization Targets: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.12: Number of Visits per Quarter to Top Targets, Payer Organizations: General Groups, US
  • Figure 4.13: Number of Visits per Quarter to Top Targets, Payer Organizations: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 4.14: Number of Visits per Quarter to Top Targets, Payer Organizations: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 4.15: Number of Visits per Quarter to Top Targets, Payer Organizations: Targeted Groups

Internal Operations for Key Account Management Teams

  • Figure 4.16: Percentage of KAMs' Time Dedicated to Specific Activities: General Groups, US
  • Figure 4.17: Percentage of KAMs' Time Dedicated to Specific Activities: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 4.18: Percentage of KAMs' Time Dedicated to Specific Activities: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 4.19: Percentage of KAMs' Time Dedicated to Specific Activities: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.20: Key Decisions Influenced via KAM Interactions with Accounts: General Groups
  • Figure 4.21: Key Decisions Influenced via KAM Interactions with Accounts: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.22: Key Decisions Influenced via KAM Interactions with Accounts: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.23: Current Level of KAM and Sales Rep Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.24: Current Level of KAM and Sales Rep Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.25: Current Level of KAM and Sales Rep Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.26: Current Level of KAM and Managed Markets Account Manager Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.27: Current Level of KAM and Managed Markets Account Manager Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.28: Current Level of KAM and Managed Markets Account Manager Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.29: Current Level of KAM and MSL Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.30: Current Level of KAM and MSL Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.31: Current Level of KAM and MSL Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.32: Current Level of KAM and HOL Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.33: Current Level of KAM and HOL Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.34: Current Level of KAM and HOL Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.35: Current Level of KAM and MCL Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.36: Current Level of KAM and MCL Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.37: Current Level of KAM and MCL Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.38: Current Level of KAM and HEOR Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.39: Current Level of KAM and HEOR Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.40: Current Level of KAM and HEOR Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.41: Current Level of KAM and Pricing Team Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.42: Current Level of KAM and Pricing Team Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.43: Current Level of KAM and Pricing Team Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.44: Current Level of KAM and Medical Information Team Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.45: Current Level of KAM and Medical Information Team Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.46: Current Level of KAM and Medical Information Team Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.47: Ideal Level of KAM and Sales Reps Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.48: Ideal Level of KAM and Sales Reps Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.49: Ideal Level of KAM and Sales Reps Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.50: Ideal Level of KAM and Managed Markets Account Manager Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.51: Ideal Level of KAM and Managed Markets Account Manager Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.52: Current Level of KAM and Managed Markets Account Managers Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.53: Ideal Level of KAM and MSL Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.54: Ideal Level of KAM and MSL Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.55: Ideal Level of KAM and MSL Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.56: Ideal Level of KAM and HOL Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.57: Ideal Level of KAM and HOL Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.58: Ideal Level of KAM and HOL Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.59: Ideal Level of KAM and MCL Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.60: Ideal Level of KAM and MCL Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.61: Ideal Level of KAM and MCL Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.62: Ideal Level of KAM and HEOR Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.63: Ideal Level of KAM and HEOR Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.64: Ideal Level of KAM and HEOR Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.65: Ideal Level of KAM and Pricing Team Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.66: Ideal Level of KAM and Pricing Team Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.67: Ideal Level of KAM and Pricing Team Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.68: Ideal Level of KAM and Medical Information Team Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups
  • Figure 4.69: Ideal Level of KAM and Medical Information Team Interactions and Collaborations: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.70: Ideal Level of KAM and Medical Information Team Interactions and Collaborations: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.71: Percentage of KAM-to-Field Rep Communication via Specific Channels: General Groups, US
  • Figure 4.72: Percentage of KAM-to-Field Rep Communication via Specific Channels: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 4.73 Percentage of KAM-to-Field Rep Communication via Specific Channels: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 4.74: Percentage of KAM-to-Field Rep Communication via Specific Channels: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.75: Frequency of KAM-to-Field Rep Communication: General Groups, US
  • Figure 4.76: Frequency of KAM-to-Field Rep Communication: General Groups, EU
  • Figure 4.77: Frequency of KAM-to-Field Rep Communication: General Groups, Rest of World
  • Figure 4.78: Frequency of KAM-to-Field Rep Communication: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.79: Type of CRM System Used by KAM Team: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.80: Type of CRM System Used by KAM Team: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.81: Teams with CRM System Access: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.82: Teams with CRM System Access: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.83: Key CRM System Uses: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.84: Key CRM System Uses: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.85: KAM Performance Evaluation Metrics Collected: General Groups
  • Figure 4.86: KAM Performance Evaluation Metrics Collected: General Groups, by Region
  • Figure 4.87: KAM Performance Evaluation Metrics Collected: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.88: Methods of Key Account Satisfaction Feedback: General Groups
  • Figure 4.89: Methods of Key Account Satisfaction Feedback: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.90: KAM Qualities Measured via Feedback Surveys: General Groups
  • Figure 4.91: KAM Qualities Measured via Feedback Surveys: Targeted Groups
  • Figure 4.92: Percentage of Key Account Feedback Surveys Returned: General Groups
  • Figure 4.93: Percentage of Key Account Feedback Surveys Returned: Targeted Groups

Key Account Management Team Profiles

  • Figure 5.1: Company A: Company Background and KAM Structure
  • Figure 5.2: Company A: KAM Resources and Compensation
  • Figure 5.3: Company A: Account Management Details
  • Figure 5.4: Company B: Company Background and KAM Structure
  • Figure 5.5: Company B: KAM Resources and Compensation
  • Figure 5.6: Company B: Account Management Details
  • Figure 5.7: Company C: Company Background and KAM Structure
  • Figure 5.8: Company C: KAM Resources and Compensation
  • Figure 5.9: Company C: Account Management Details
  • Figure 5.10: Company D: Company Background and KAM Structure
  • Figure 5.11: Company D: KAM Resources and Compensation
  • Figure 5.12: Company D: Account Management Details
  • Figure 5.13: Company E: Company Background and KAM Structure
  • Figure 5.14: Company E: KAM Resources and Compensation
  • Figure 5.15: Company E: Account Management Details
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