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市場調查報告書

藥品商品化簡介:最適合的預算編制、時機推動品牌成功

Pharmaceutical Commercialization Profiles: Driving Brand Success with Better Budgeting and Timing

出版商 Cutting Edge Information 商品編碼 341199
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 147 Pages
商品交期: 最快1-2個工作天內
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藥品商品化簡介:最適合的預算編制、時機推動品牌成功 Pharmaceutical Commercialization Profiles: Driving Brand Success with Better Budgeting and Timing
出版日期: 2015年08月31日 內容資訊: 英文 147 Pages
簡介

本報告提供從前臨床開發到上市後2年的產品生命週期之醫藥品的新產品規劃及品牌支出相關最佳業務實踐及基準揭示。

摘要整理

依產品生命週期之品牌活動支援

由初期臨床開發之產品商品化的資源配置

為後期開發階段進入市場的準備

銷售後品牌商品化的最佳化

摘要整理

醫藥品品牌的商品化:成功的主要建議

依產品生命週期之品牌活動支援

主要的產品特徵檢討、品牌策略開發的內部資源

經由策略評估的支援、產品生命週期的活動之品牌資源投資

為了減輕課題的產品生命週期之維持彈性策略

由初期臨床開發之產品商品化的資源配置

為了最佳化市場潛力的產品開發中的初期品牌支援

初期開發品牌的支出簡介

對後期開發階段的市場進入的準備

為了最佳化市場影響的商品化資源的擴大

後期開發品牌的支出簡介

銷售後品牌商品化的最佳化

為了影響市場、導向成功的銷售後繼續高標準品牌支援

銷售後品牌支出簡介

目錄
Product Code: PH216

Pharmaceutical firms face a number of challenges moving emerging brands through development and into today's saturated commercial landscape. Brand teams must begin strategizing and determining commercialization spends early in the development process. In many cases, companies begin initial market assessments as early as pre-clinical development. However, commercialization committees need the human and financial resources to support products as they mature. This report serves as a guide to pharmaceutical companies that are undertaking new product planning or determining brand support levels and resources during pre-clinical development to two years on the market. Research highlights how brands determine resource levels - both brand spend budgets and brand commercialization committee members. Companies must also consider when to begin specific activities, especially brand and market assessments that help commercialization committees set strategies. Finally, they must allocate their brand spend across a broad spectrum of support activities, from medical affairs to market research to marketing and commercial initiatives. Because each pharmaceutical product is different, this study profiles multiple companies across three product lifecycle phases:

  • 10 companies during early brand development (pre-clinical to Phase 2 testing)
  • 11 companies during late-stage brand development (Phase 3a to registration
  • and launch)
  • 7 companies post-product launch (launch year to two years on market)

PHARMACEUTICAL BRAND COMMERCIALIZATION: KEY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SUCCESS

Cutting Edge Information analysts synthesized the following five key recommendations from the full breadth and depth of this project's research. These principles are signposts to help improve your pharmaceutical brand commercialization strategies and resources. These points emphasize this study's central and most critical concepts.

CREATE CROSS-FUNCTIONAL COMMITTEES TO COORDINATE ACTIVITIES AND MITIGATE CHALLENGES THROUGHOUT BRAND DEVELOPMENT AND COMMERCIALIZATION

Developing brands require support from several functions throughout the company. As multiple teams work on the product, they must coordinate their activities and timelines to move it more quickly to market. For many life science companies, a brand commercialization committee is responsible for making brand strategy decisions as well as coordinating brand activities throughout the product lifecycle. Regular collaboration between internal experts allows teams to take action at the most appropriate time throughout brand development.

As brands mature, brand commercialization committees often change. Not only do these committees tend to grow in size, but the teams represented on these committees may also change. As Figure E.1 shows, new product planning groups are most commonly represented during pre-clinical development - at 80% of surveyed companies. Three other teams - clinical development, legal and market research - are present at 60% of surveyed companies.

By Phase 3, each function is represented in a brand commercialization committee at more than half of surveyed pharmaceutical firms (Figure E.2). All surveyed organizations represent regulatory, pricing and marketing stakeholders during this development phase.

Figure E.1: Functions Represented on Brand Commer-cialization Committee, Pre-Clinical

image1

Figure E.2: Functions Represented on Brand Commer-cialization Committee, Phase 3

image2

Firms implement regular communication between these committee members to ensure that collaborations run smoothly. Company A, a small pharma firm operating in the US, begins holding brand commercialization meetings two years before product launch. These meetings occur once per month and continue up to 12 months post-launch. This regularity allows the group to make a thorough list of action items for the duration of the brand's lifecycle.

A Company A brand executive explained, "Just about every function at one point or another is going to be involved in the [brand] launch. For us, it's important to have a cross-functional team that meets regularly so that - when functions jump in and out of activities - everyone is already working together... It's unrealistic to think that your marketer or commercial lead will know the perfect time for each function to go into action."

DEFINE PHARMACEUTICAL BRAND BUDGETS EARLY, BUT REMAIN FLEXIBLE TO ACCOMMODATE UNEXPECTED OPPORTUNITIES

Pharmaceutical companies determine their brands' annual spend based on a number of factors - including the product's market entry, expected peak revenue and the company's own resources. Each brand is unique and requires different levels of support to optimize success. However, many brand teams draw on previous launch and support experiences to set budgets.

Pharma organizations tend to set brand spending plans early. At Company B, a pharma company supporting a prominent US brand, the brand team negotiates the product's spending during a business planning meeting early in the year. While the brand team starts the year with a structured spending plan, Company B's executives always plan to make adjustments. One surveyed consultant explained, "There is always an expectation that you would implement your plan. But opportunities arise in the marketplace and - if there is a good opportunity - you make the adjustment within your budget."

Small pharma Company C takes similar precautions. The brand team determines the expected spend for each product during specific lifecycle phases - which is determined as both necessary line items and a "vaulted budget" to cover unexpected expenses. Company C has traditionally launched products in Eastern markets, but it has recently begun commercialization in the US. During the development and commercialization process, the team has used some of its vaulted budget to cover what an interviewed Company C executive called "typical Western phenomena," or commercialization expenses unique to the US market. These factors include:

  • Patient Organization
  • Direct-to-Patient (DTC) television advertisements
  • Key Opinion Leader (KOL) engagement activities

The executive added, "I know the general [brand spend] budget for next year. However...we have little experience marketing drugs in the Western world, and we have had to make changes to our budget projections and will continue to do so as awareness develops."

BEGIN BRAND ASSESSMENT AND MARKET RESEARCH ACTIVITIES EARLY IN THE LIFECYCLE - AS SOON AS PRE-CLINICAL DEVELOPMENT

Brand assessments form the foundation for commercialization strategies as products mature. While companies can perform these activities at any time in the lifecycle, many surveyed firms first take on these assessments during early development. In some cases, brand teams begin assessing their products and commercial landscapes as early as pre-clinical development. These early assessments are instrumental as teams coordinate necessary support activities and determine best-fit budgets.

Figure E.3 shows the percentage of surveyed pharma companies completing specific brand assessment activities by developmental phase. As shown, the majority of surveyed companies report completing each brand assessment during Phase 3. However, many companies also complete activities much sooner. For example, 25% of surveyed pharma companies complete commercial risk assessments during pre-clinical development; another 38% of pharma firms complete this activity during Phase 2.

For many companies, Phase 2 is the prime time to take on brand assessment activities. Three-quarters of surveyed firms report completing disease state assessments (Figure E.3). Another 63% each of surveyed firms take on competitive landscape assessments and unmet need assessments during Phase 2.

Figure E.3: Percentage of Companies Completing Specific Brand Assessment Activities, by Development Phase

image3

PREPARE FOR DIRECT-TO-CONSUMER CAMPAIGNS AS EARLY AS PHASE 3B DEVELOPMENT

During late-stage development - Phase 3a to registration and launch - pharmaceutical companies begin to ramp up commercial support for their emerging brands. Figure E.4 shows the average percentage of marketing and commercial spend that surveyed companies allocate to specific activities. During Phase 3a, surveyed pharmaceutical companies typically divided budgets evenly across marketing and commercial activities. Promotional speaker programs claim a significantly larger percentage - an average 21% - compared to other supported activities.

By Phase 3b, however, surveyed companies begin targeting specific commercial activities. For these firms, many of which commercialized brands in the US market, an average 52% of total marketing and commercial spend is dedicated to direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising. This average remains similar, at 54%, during product registration and launch. For companies operating in the US - one of two world markets which allows DTC - these marketing tactics are the easiest way to reach patients with brand messages. Campaigns encompass any TV, print, radio or other mass media used to reach to end users rather than healthcare professionals. Often, these DTC campaigns are beneficial in inciting conversations about products between patients and their physicians.

Figure E.4: Average Percentage of Marketing and Commercial Spend Allocated to Specific Activities, by Phase: Phase 3a to Registration and Launch

image4

By Phase 3b, companies are well equipped to begin working on DTC campaigns that will be released once the product is approved by the FDA. At this point in development, brand teams have a good idea of what their product labels may look like; these details inform promotional messaging. Teams have also typically completed the necessary market research to begin investing in these campaigns. An executive at small pharma Company A explained, "DTC often requires more market research than physician detailing. I find that a lot of the choices around DTC depend on your market position."

As part of its DTC campaign, Company B crafted a long-term TV commercial series to support its product. A Company B consultant noted that, compared to other promotional tactics, TV campaigns consume a significant amount of total brand spend. For this reason, brand teams typically wait until a product's label is approved before finalizing these ads. "When you get into TV, you start giving up significant investments compared to the rest of your brand. The development of this campaign took hundreds of thousands of dollars - if not millions of dollars - in market research and testing different nuances." The executive also cautions brand teams to consider their target market before beginning television DTC ads. Brands intended for broader patient populations will greatly benefit from these mass media campaigns. However, those with more niche populations may require a more targeted approach.

RAMP UP PROMOTIONAL SPEAKER PROGRAM AND PROVIDER SUPPORT SPENDS AS PRODUCTS MATURE ON THE MARKET

Post-launch, companies continue to focus brand spend on marketing and commercial activities. Though brands continue to support medical affairs and market access activities, much of the groundwork for these areas has been laid pre-launch. As brands mature, pharmaceutical brand teams also adjust their marketing and commercialization focus. While surveyed brands increase DTC spending just before product launch, other promotional areas gain support as products mature in the market.

Figure E.5 shows the average percentage of marketing and commercial spend that surveyed companies allocate to specific activities. As brands mature, companies tend to decrease the percentage of total marketing and commercial spend allocated to DTC advertising. During the launch year, surveyed pharma firms allocate the largest percentage of their marketing spends - an average 77% - to DTC ads. This allocation decreases to an average 64% during the first year on the market and to an average 54% during the second year. Though DTC spending decreases, it continues to consume more than half of surveyed companies' budgets on average.

Figure E.5: Average Percentage of Marketing and Commercial Spend Allocated to Specific Activities, by Phase: Launch Year to Second Year on Market

image5

As products mature, brand teams shift some of their attention away from patient-centric avenues to direct messages to providers and healthcare professionals. While direct-to-consumer spending decreases as brands mature, surveyed companies begin contributing higher percentages of their commercial resources to provider support programs and promotional speaker programs. Provider support grows from an average 1% of commercial spend during the launch year to 9% during the second year on market. Promotional speaker programs spend increases from an average 4% during the launch year to an average 14% - the second-highest spend after DTC - during the second year on market. Both of these avenues focus on increasing physicians' knowledge and comfort with the brand.

ABOUT THIS REPORT

Cutting Edge Information conducted this research to uncover best practices and benchmarks associated with pharmaceutical new product planning and brand spend throughout the product lifecycle from pre-clinical development to two years on market. Analysts collected surveys from and consulted with more than 30 pharmaceutical executives at a number of top life science companies and consultants in the development of this report. Executives taking part in this research range from senior-level and C-suite executives to consultants working on the front lines of pharmaceutical brand commercialization.

DATA COLLECTION

This study collected data from knowledgeable pharmaceutical industry executives about a single brand commercialization experience. These data reflect commercialization practices and spend employed for a single product and may not reflect average practices at a company.

Analysts developed the information upon which this study is based through both primary and secondary sources. Cutting Edge Information's process for collecting and analyzing information encompasses two distinct tools: quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews. Both tools are necessary for understanding not only the hard metrics included in this study, but also the reasoning behind the metrics.

Cutting Edge Information analysts began developing the quantitative survey tool used in this study by working closely with pharmaceutical industry executives. Once the research team completed the survey design, analysts recruited study participants from pharmaceutical firms commercializing products in the US as well as ex-US markets to collect data on commercialization teams, activities and spending. The research team collected all survey data through primary research with pharmaceutical commercialization executives. Altogether Cutting Edge Information collected and analyzed data sets from 31 companies of all sizes working in markets worldwide. Study participants included product managers, vice presidents and directors of new business development and product marketing and C-suite executives, as well as industry experts working for high-level consultancies.

Because of the cross-functional nature of brand commercialization and support, not all survey participants were able to provide complete spending breakouts. In some instances where incomplete brand data were provided, research analysts used statistical modeling to complete brand spend profiles. For modeling purposes, analysts considered the individual company's reported data and trends across all lifecycle phases as well as data reported for similar companies, brands and markets.

Once study participants submitted a survey, analysts used qualitative interviews to uncover more detailed information. Cutting Edge Information used telephone interviews with pharma executives to understand challenges and solutions to meeting the demands of new product planning and early commercialization. By interviewing a selection of survey respondents, Cutting Edge Information gained a deeper understanding of pharmaceutical brand commercialization. In return for these parties' contributions, they received the study results.

COMPANY BLINDING

To ensure that Cutting Edge Information protects the identities and privacy of all study participants, this research does not name the companies or products it examines, nor does it link specific companies with therapeutic areas. Company blinding is a critical device that allows survey respondents to comfortably provide accurate data for studies such as this one.

COMPANY SIZE

This study divides surveyed companies into three categories to differentiate by size. Within the pharmaceutical industry, analysts divided the surveyed firms into four sizes Pharmaceutical Executive magazine's 2013 assessment. The categories used to analyze the data are:

  • Top 10 Companies: Pharmaceutical and biotech companies ranked in the Top 10 according to Pharmaceutical Executive. Generally, these companies achieve annual drug revenues above $10 billion.
  • Top 50 Companies: Pharmaceutical and biotech companies ranked between 11 and 50. Generally, these companies achieve annual drug revenues greater than $2 billion.
  • Small Companies: Pharmaceutical companies that ranked outside of the Top 50. Generally, these companies achieve annual drug revenues less than $2 billion.
  • Biotech Companies: Life science companies that focus on biotechnology and that are ranked outside of the Top 50.

SPENDING CATEGORIES

To compare like numbers across a wide range of brands and companies, this report distills commercialization resources into three large umbrellas: medical affairs, market access and marketing, and commercial. Under each umbrella, this study provides resource spending for several subcategories, outlined below, to provide a more detailed brand spend. This study breaks out budget resources into the following spending categories:

MEDICAL AFFAIRS

  • Medical Education: This subcategory includes all resource allocations associated with delivering accredited and non-accredited continuing medical education (CME) and promotional education programs, including strategy development, program selection, grant application management and decision making, vendor selection and management, and program management.
  • Medical Information: Function within medical affairs that is responsible for disseminating and communicating label information, medical data, off-label information, etc. to physicians, payers and consumers.
  • MSL Activities: This subcategory includes all resources allocations associated with thought leader identification, development and engagement.
  • Medical Publications: Function within medical affairs that is responsible for creating and distributing abstracts and manuscripts to scientific and medical journals.

MARKET ACCESS AND DECISION SUPPORT

  • Pricing and Reimbursement: This subcategory includes resource allocations associated with the design and execution of pricing studies as well as work concerning strategic pricing decisions. Resource levels also include resource allocations associated with securing reimbursement for the brand from third-party payers. Included are costs for marketing to and negotiating formulary placement with payer organizations such as insurance companies, local and federal government agencies, HMOs and other groups.
  • Health Economics and Outcomes Research: This subcategory includes investments in the study of health economics and health outcomes associated with the use of pharmaceutical products.
  • Market Research: This subcategory includes resource allocations associated with the design and execution of market research studies, such as primary and secondary research and message testing.
  • Competitive Intelligence: This subcategory includes resource allocations associated with tracking market trends and competitor moves.

MARKETING AND COMMERCIAL

  • Detail Aids and Materials: This subcategory includes resource allocations associated with development and creation of posters, brochures, promotional items, supplements and other promotional tools.
  • Print Journal Ads: This subcategory includes all resource allocations associated with the creation and placement of journal ads.
  • Promotional Speaker Programs: This subcategory includes all resource allocations associated sponsorship and promotional speaking engagements. This category excludes resources allocated to educational speaker programs.
  • Conference Promotions: This subcategory includes all resource allocations associated with sponsorship and presence at conferences, symposia, and congresses.
  • Digital Marketing: This subcategory includes all resource allocations associated with the creation and maintenance of websites, social media, mobile health and paid search campaigns.
  • Provider Support: This subcategory includes all resources allocations associated with physician support and education programs.
  • Targeted Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) Ads: This subcategory includes all resource allocations associated with the creation and running of direct-to-consumer advertising.
  • Patient Communication/Education: This subcategory includes all resource allocations associated with educating patients, including programs for patient outreach, patient advocacy, adherence and disease management.

Table of Contents

8 Executive Summary

  • 9 Pharmaceutical Brand Commercialization: Key Recommendations for Success

22 Supporting Brand Activities Throughout the Product Lifecycle

  • 23 Consider Key Product Attributes and Internal Resources to Develop Brand Strategies
  • 35 Invest Brand Resources to Support Strategic Assessments and Activities Throughout the Product Lifecycle
  • 51 Maintain Flexible Strategies Throughout the Product Lifecycle to Mitigate Challenges

52 Resourcing Product Commercialization through Early Clinical Development

  • 53 Support Brands Early During Product Development to Optimize Market Potential
  • 64 Early Development Brand Spend Profiles

85 Preparing for Market Entry During Late-Stage Development

  • 86 Increase Commercialization Resources to Optimize Market Impact
  • 98 Late-Stage Development Brand Spend Profiles

121 Optimizing Brand Commercialization Post-Launch

  • 122 Continue High-Level Brand Support Post-Launch to Guide Market Impact and Success
  • 133 Post-Launch Brand Spend Profiles

8 Executive Summary

9 Pharmaceutical Brand Commercialization: Key Recommendations for Success

  • 10 Figure E.1: Functions Represented on Brand Commercialization Committee: Pre-Clinical
  • 10 Figure E.2: Functions Represented on Brand Commer-cialization Committee, Phase 3
  • 13 Figure E.3: Percentage of Companies Completing Specific Brand Assessment Activities, by Development Phase
  • 15 Figure E.4: Average Percentage of Marketing and Commercial Spend Allocated to Specific Activities, by Phase: Phase 3a to Registration and Launch
  • 16 Figure E.5: Average Percentage of Marketing and Commercial Spend Allocated to Specific Activities, by Phase: Launch Year to Second Year on Market

22 Supporting Brand Activities Throughout the Product Lifecycle

23 Consider Key Product Attributes and Internal Resources to Develop Brand Strategies

  • 28 Figure 1.1: Functions Represented on Brand Commer-cialization Committee: Pre-Clinical
  • 28 Figure 1.2: Functions Represented on Brand Commercialization Committee: Phase 1
  • 29 Figure 1.3: Functions Represented on Brand Commer-cialization Committee: Phase 2
  • 29 Figure 1.4: Functions Represented on Brand Commercialization Committee: Phase 3
  • 31 Figure 1.5: Number of FTEs Serving on Brand Commercialization Committees During Pre- Clinical Development, by Function
  • 31 Figure 1.6: Number of FTEs Serving on Brand Commercialization Committees During Phase 1 Development, by Function
  • 32 Figure 1.7: Number of FTEs Serving on Brand Commercialization Committees During Phase 2 Development, by Function
  • 32 Figure 1.8: Number of FTEs Serving on Brand Commercialization Committees During Phase 3 Development, by Function

35 Invest Brand Resources to Support Strategic Assessments and Activities Throughout the Product Lifecycle

  • 36 Figure 1.9: Percentage of Companies Completing Specific Brand Assessment Activities, by Development Phase
  • 37 Figure 1.10: Company Spending (in USD) on Specific Brand Assessment Activities
  • 39 Figure 1.11: Percentage of Companies Completing Specific Brand Strategy and Planning Activities, by Development Phase
  • 40 Figure 1.12: Company Spending (in USD) on Specific Brand Strategy and Planning Activities
  • 42 Figure 1.13: Percentage of Companies Completing Specific Brand Commercialization Activities, by Development Phase
  • 43 Figure 1.14: Company Spending on Specific Brand Commercialization Activities

51 Maintain Flexible Strategies Throughout the Product Lifecycle to Mitigate Challenges

52 Resourcing Product Commercialization through Early Clinical Development

53 Support Brands Early During Product Development to Optimize Market Potential

  • 54 Figure 2.1: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Region: Pre- Clinical
  • 54 Figure 2.2: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Region: Phase 1
  • 55 Figure 2.3: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Region: Phase 2
  • 56 Figure 2.4: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Company Size: Pre-Clinical
  • 57 Figure 2.5: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Company Size: Phase 1
  • 57 Figure 2.6: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Company Size: Phase 2
  • 59 Figure 2.7: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Market Entry: Pre- Clinical
  • 59 Figure 2.8: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Market Entry: Phase 1
  • 60 Figure 2.9: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Market Entry: Phase 2
  • 61 Figure 2.10: Brand Spend v. Expected Peak Revenue: Pre-Clinical
  • 61 Figure 2.11: Brand Spend v. Expected Peak Revenue: Phase 1
  • 62 Figure 2.12: Brand Spend v. Expected Peak Revenue: Phase 2
  • 63 Figure 2.13: Percentage of Change in Total Brand Spend Across Early Development

64 Early Development Brand Spend Profiles

  • 65 Figure 2.14: Company 1 Brand Background and Spend
  • 66 Figure 2.15: Company 1 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 67 Figure 2.16: Company 2 Brand Background and Spend
  • 68 Figure 2.17: Company 2 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 69 Figure 2.18: Company 3 Brand Background and Spend
  • 70 Figure 2.19: Company 3 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 71 Figure 2.20: Company 4 Brand Background and Spend
  • 72 Figure 2.21: Company 4 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 73 Figure 2.22: Company 5 Brand Background and Spend
  • 74 Figure 2.23: Company 5 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 75 Figure 2.24: Company 6 Brand Background and Spend
  • 76 Figure 2.25: Company 6 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 77 Figure 2.26: Company 7 Brand Background and Spend
  • 78 Figure 2.27: Company 7 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 79 Figure 2.28: Company 8 Brand Background and Spend
  • 80 Figure 2.29: Company 8 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 81 Figure 2.30: Company 9 Brand Background and Spend
  • 82 Figure 2.31: Company 9 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 83 Figure 2.32: Company 10 Brand Background and Spend
  • 84 Figure 2.33: Company 10 Spending By Category and Development Phase

85 Preparing for Market Entry During Late-Stage Development

86 Increase Commercialization Resources to Optimize Market Impact

98 Late-Stage Development Brand Spend Profiles

  • 87 Figure 3.1: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Region: Phase 3a
  • 88 Figure 3.2: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Region: Phase 3b
  • 88 Figure 3.3: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Region: Registration and Launch
  • 90 Figure 3.4: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Company Size: Phase 3a
  • 90 Figure 3.5: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Company Size: Phase 3b
  • 91 Figure 3.6: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Company Size: Registration and Launch
  • 93 Figure 3.7: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Product Type: Phase 3a
  • 93 Figure 3.8: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Market Entry: Phase 3b
  • 94 Figure 3.9: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Market Entry: Registration and Launch
  • 95 Figure 3.10: Brand Spend v. Expected Peak Revenue: Phase 3a
  • 95 Figure 3.11: Brand Spend v. Expected Peak Revenue: Phase 3b
  • 96 Figure 3.12: Brand Spend v. Expected Peak Revenue: Registration and Launch
  • 97 Figure 3.13: Percentage of Change in Total Brand Spend Across Late-Stage Development
  • 99 Figure 3.14: Company 11 Brand Background and Spend
  • 100 Figure 3.15: Company 11 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 101 Figure 3.16: Company 12 Brand Background and Spend
  • 102 Figure 3.17: Company 12 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 103 Figure 3.18: Company 13 Brand Background and Spend
  • 104 Figure 3.19: Company 13 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 105 Figure 3.20: Company 14 Brand Background and Spend
  • 106 Figure 3.21: Company 14 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 107 Figure 3.22: Company 15 Brand Background and Spend
  • 108 Figure 3.23: Company 15 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 109 Figure 3.24: Company 3 Brand Background and Spend
  • 110 Figure 3.25: Company 3 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 111 Figure 3.26: Company 16 Brand Background and Spend
  • 112 Figure 3.27: Company 16 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 113 Figure 3.28: Company 17 Brand Background and Spend
  • 114 Figure 3.29: Company 17 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 115 Figure 3.30: Company 18 Brand Background and Spend
  • 116 Figure 3.31: Company 18 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 117 Figure 3.31: Company 19 Brand Background and Spend
  • 118 Figure 3.32: Company 19 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 119 Figure 3.33: Company 20 Brand Background and Spend
  • 120 Figure 3.34: Company 20 Spending by Category and Development Phase

121 Optimizing Brand Commercialization Post-Launch

122 Continue High-Level Brand Support Post-Launch to Guide Market Impact and Success

  • 123 Figure 4.1: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Region: Launch Year
  • 124 Figure 4.2: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Region: First Year on Market
  • 124 Figure 4.3: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Region: Second Year on Market
  • 126 Figure 4.4: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Company Size: Launch Year
  • 126 Figure 4.5: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Company Size: First Year on Market
  • 127 Figure 4.6: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Company Size: Second Year on Market
  • 128 Figure 4.7: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Market Entry: Launch Year
  • 129 Figure 4.8: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Market Entry: First Year on Market
  • 129 Figure 4.9: Percentage of Budget Dedicated to Specific Spending Categories, by Market Entry: Second Year on Market
  • 130 Figure 4.10: Brand Spend v. Expected Peak Revenue: Launch Year
  • 131 Figure 4.11: Brand Spend v. Expected Peak Revenue: First Year on Market
  • 131 Figure 4.12: Brand Spend v. Expected Peak Revenue: Second Year on Market
  • 132 Figure 4.13: Percentage of Change in Total Brand Spend From Launch Through the Second Year on Market

133 Post-Launch Brand Spend Profiles

  • 134 Figure 4.14: Company 11 Brand Background and Spend
  • 135 Figure 4.15: Company 11 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 136 Figure 4.16: Company 12 Brand Background and Spend
  • 137 Figure 4.17: Company 12 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 138 Figure 4.18: Company 21 Brand Background and Spend
  • 139 Figure 4.19: Company 21 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 140 Figure 4.20: Company 22 Brand Background and Spend
  • 141 Figure 4.21: Company 22 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 142 Figure 4.22: Company 13 Brand Background and Spend
  • 143 Figure 4.23: Company 13 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 144 Figure 4.24: Company 14 Brand Background and Spend
  • 145 Figure 4.25: Company 14 Spending by Category and Development Phase
  • 146 Figure 4.26: Company 23 Brand Background and Spend
  • 147 Figure 4.27: Company 23 Spending by Category and Development Phase
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