Cover Image
市場調查報告書

醫藥品銷售的優先順序:建立患者連結及掌握全球性價格

Pharmaceutical Launch Sequencing: Establishing Patient Access and Understanding Global Pricing

出版商 Cutting Edge Information 商品編碼 250703
出版日期 內容資訊 英文 79 Pages, 3 Chapters, 400+ Metrics, 65+ Charts/Graphics
商品交期: 最快1-2個工作天內
價格
Back to Top
醫藥品銷售的優先順序:建立患者連結及掌握全球性價格 Pharmaceutical Launch Sequencing: Establishing Patient Access and Understanding Global Pricing
出版日期: 2016年05月30日 內容資訊: 英文 79 Pages, 3 Chapters, 400+ Metrics, 65+ Charts/Graphics
簡介

標準價格大大影響現在生物醫藥品的銷售策略。自家公司的產品價格設定中,由於各國愈來愈傾向參考其他國家的狀況,低價格市場的產品初期投入,在全球整體市場收益性非常可能降低。為了最大限度擴大產品收益,特別是創新藥劑的情況,企業更需要非常注意設定銷售市場優先順序。

本報告提供將醫藥品在全球推出時企業為了擴大其利益在市場上的優先順序調查,提供您優化發售優先順序的方法,該市場上最佳解決方案、主要趨勢、以及對內部、外部相關利益者而言決策的促進因子等相關分析。

摘要整理:收益最大化及全球市場連結的達成

透過結構·支出支援全球銷售的優先順序

  • 為了支援新興品牌發展銷售優先順序的措施
  • 通過內部結構將銷售優先順序的責任體系化
  • 決定銷售優先順序的流程·工具資源配置

成功銷售優先順序的調整

  • 銷售優先順序工具的管理
  • 銷售優先順序的開發·維持

全球銷售優先順序趨勢·實踐

  • 銷售優先順序的全球趨勢
  • 鎖定各市場上銷售的主要情形

收益最大化·全球市場連結的達成

透過結構·支出支援全球銷售的優先順序

圖表

本網頁內容可能與最新版本有所差異。詳細情況請與我們聯繫。

目錄
Product Code: PH219

MAXIMIZING REVENUE AND ACHIEVING GLOBAL MARKET ACCESS

Setting a global launch sequence for pharmaceutical products requires extensive research and planning to coordinate the launch effectively. While a launch sequence will depend on a number of factors specific to the individual product - including marketed indication(s), available evidence and competitors - there are several overall trends for companies to consider while looking to establish a successful launch sequence:

  • Early planning is critical to the success of a launch sequence, as is the need for a high-level sign-off on the final plan. Both of these steps ensure team unity as the sequence moves forward.
  • Heeding the guidance of regulatory studies and maintaining constant contact with internal regulatory groups are crucial for keeping licensing cascades on target and setting realistic launch sequences.
  • The traditional first wave mainstays - launching in the US and in major European markets - remain. But emerging markets such as Brazil and India are becoming common second wave targets.

As companies move forward with global launches in an increasingly cost-sensitive environment, small adjustments to launch sequences can result in a significant impact on revenue and overall market access.

USE OF THIS REPORT

This report is designed to help companies maximize their margins when launching products worldwide. It includes answers to specific questions on how to optimize launch sequencing and how to best allocate resources in this space. Key trends are identified in how companies approach launch sequences and what drives decision making among internal and external stakeholders.

KEY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LAUNCH SEQUENCING SUCCESS

Cutting Edge Information's analysts synthesized the following four key findings and recommendations from the full breadth and depth of this project's research. These principles are signposts to help you improve your company's strategy for pharmaceutical product launch activities. While these points are not inclusive of all elements in this report, they emphasize some of its central and most critical concepts.

ASSIGN FINAL LAUNCH SEQUENCING DECISIONS TO C-LEVEL EXECUTIVES

At many pharmaceutical firms, C-level executives have ultimate responsibility for launch sequence decisions. Because launch sequencing has such a large impact on a brand's potential revenue, these high-level executives - or in some publicly traded companies, a chairman and executive board - are best positioned to review and approve plans. “How they sequence their launch, or when they invest, is [a company's] core expense,” explained a consulting Company C executive.

Figure E.1 highlights the business unit with ultimate responsibility for approving launch sequences among surveyed companies. The majority of surveyed firms, 62%, grant launch sequencing approval to C-level executives or the company's executive board. Another 13% of surveyed companies each look to marketing teams or to specialized launch sequencing committees for final approval. Only 6% each look to market access teams or brand managers.

Though executives may have final say in launch sequencing decisions, they may not be involved in actual planning sessions. Top-level executives are typically involved during early planning stages, when committees and any consultants discuss methodology, as well as during final presentations or recommendations.

A Company C consultant noted that having C-suite executives involved early in the planning process is particularly helpful to the overall process. “They make the decisions - what's the go or no-go - but they have to use the right criteria. If they don't agree with your criteria upfront, they will second-guess their team the whole way through [the planning process],” the consultant explained.

Figure E.1:
Business Unit with Ultimate Responsibility for
Approving Launch Sequence: All Companies

LOOK TO REGULATORY GUIDANCES TO DRIVE GLOBAL LAUNCH DECISIONS

Planning for a successful global launch is a complicated process. Committees must take into account a number of considerations across multiple markets. Pharmaceutical companies must be well-informed about market-specific obstacles, including regulatory requirements and price referencing schemas, to best formulate launch sequences.

Figure E.2 highlights the key tools that surveyed companies use during launch sequence development. The majority, 88% of surveyed firms, look to regulatory guidance to inform global launch planning. Both large and small pharma companies rely on guidance - at 83% and 80% of surveyed firms, respectively. Regulatory guidance informs market access teams of any requirements that companies must meet to enter specific markets. Companies learn of any groundwork they must perform and can better gauge the length of time required for market approval.

Figure E.2:
Tools Used in Launch Sequence Development: All Companies

PREPARE FOR THE GROWING IMPORTANCE OF BRIC MARKETS AS SECOND WAVE LAUNCH TARGETS

When compared with data collected in 2012, the newest finding shows an increase in the percentage of companies targeting Brazil, Russia, India, and China (BRIC) in their second wave. As Figure E.3 shows, from Brazil's 53% increase to Russia's 2% increase, the BRIC markets have become earlier targets in pharmaceutical launch sequences.

Figure E.3:
Year- Over-Year Trends in Second Wave Launches: All Companies

ENGAGE WITH REGULATORY TEAMS THROUGHOUT LAUNCH SEQUENCING PLANNING AND EXECUTION

To maintain realistic launch sequencing targets, constant contact with regulatory groups is required. Figure E.4 shows how frequently groups from different regions maintain contact with internal regulatory groups. Research on regulatory guidance, as discussed earlier, is an important aspect of any launch and should be taken in tandem with detailed internal discussions with regulatory groups.

Figure E.4:
Number of Meetings per Month with Regulatory Group About
Launch Sequences, by Group Region

Table of Contents

Executive Summary: Maximizing Revenue and Achieving Global Market Access

Supporting Global Launch Sequencing Through Structure and Spending

  • Developing Launch Sequencing Efforts to Support Emerging Brands
  • Organizing Launch Sequencing Responsibilities Through Internal Structure
  • Resourcing Launch Sequencing Processes and Tools

Coordinating Successful Launch Sequences

  • Managing Launch Sequencing Tools
  • Developing and Maintaining Launch Sequences

Trends and Practices for Global Launch Sequencing

  • Global Trends in Launch Sequencing
  • Identifying Key Aspects of Individual Market Launches

Maximizing Revenue and Achieving Global Market Access

  • Figure E.1: Business Unit with Ultimate Responsibility for Approving Launch Sequence: All Companies
  • Figure E.2: Tools Used in Launch Sequence Development: All Companies
  • Figure E.3: Year-Over-Year Trends in Second Wave Launches: All Companies
  • Figure E.4: Number of Meetings per Month with Regulatory Group About Launch Sequences, by Group Region

Supporting Global Launch Sequencing Through Structure and Spending

Developing Launch Sequencing Efforts to Support Emerging Brands

  • Figure 1.1: Average Number of Months Before Launch Companies Begin Launch Sequencing, by Group Type
  • Figure 1.2: Current and Ideal Start Times for Launch Sequencing: Top 10 and Top 50 Companies
  • Figure 1.3: Current and Ideal Start Time for Launch Sequencing: Small Companies
  • Figure 1.4: Business Unit with Ultimate Responsibility for Approving Launch Sequence: All Companies
  • Figure 1.5: Business Unit with Ultimate Responsibility for Approving Launch Sequence, by Company Size
  • Figure 1.6: Business Unit with Ultimate Responsibility for Approving Launch Sequence: Global Groups
  • Figure 1.7: Business Unit with Ultimate Responsibility for Approving Launch Sequence: US Groups
  • Figure 1.8: Business Unit with Ultimate Responsibility for Approving Launch Sequence: EU Groups
  • Figure 1.9: Business Unit with Ultimate Responsibility for Approving Launch Sequence: Emerging Markets Groups

Organizing Launch Sequencing Responsibilities Through Internal Structure

  • Figure 1.10: Organization of Launch Sequencing Responsibilities: All Companies
  • Figure 1.11: Organization of Launch Sequencing Responsibilities, by Company Type
  • Figure 1.12: Organization of Launch Sequencing Responsibilities, by Group Region
  • Figure 1.13: Average Number of FTEs on Launch Sequencing Committees, by Committee Type
  • Figure 1.14: Members of Ad Hoc Launch Sequencing Committees: Top 10 and Top 50 Companies
  • Figure 1.15: Members of Ad Hoc Launch Sequencing Committees: Small Companies
  • Figure 1.16: Groups Involved in Ad Hoc Launch Sequencing Committees: All Companies
  • Figure 1.17: Groups Involved in Ad Hoc Launch Sequencing Committees: Top 10 and Top 50 Companies
  • Figure 1.18: Groups Involved in Ad Hoc Launch Sequencing Committees: Small Companies
  • Figure 1.19: Number of FTEs on Dedicated Launch Sequencing Committees: All Companies
  • Figure 1.20: Funding of Dedicated Launch Sequencing Committees: All Companies

Resourcing Launch Sequencing Processes and Tools

  • Figure 1.21: Spending in 2015 on Global Launch Sequencing Activities: All Companies
  • Figure 1.22: Tools Used in Launch Sequence Development: All Companies
  • Figure 1.23 Tools Used in Launch Sequence Development: Top 10 and Top 50 Companies
  • Figure 1.24: Tools Used in Launch Sequence Development: Small Companies
  • Figure 1.25: Tools Used in Launch Sequence Development: US Groups
  • Figure 1.26: Tools Used in Launch Sequence Development: EU Groups

Coordinating Successful Launch Sequences

  • Figure 2.1: Approach to Building Launch Sequence: All Companies
  • Figure 2.2: Approach to Launch Sequence, by Company Type
  • Figure 2.3: Approach to Launch Sequence, by Group Region

Managing Launch Sequencing Tools

  • Figure 2.4: Spending on Launch Sequencing Tools: All Companies
  • Figure 2.5: Spending on Launch Sequencing Tools, by Company Type
  • Figure 2.6: Spending on Launch Sequencing Tools: Pricing Studies, by Company
  • Figure 2.7: Spending on Launch Sequencing Tools: Regulatory Guidance, by Company
  • Figure 2.8: Spending on Launch Sequencing Tools: Payer Advisory Boards, by Company
  • Figure 2.9: Spending on Launch Sequencing Tools: Market Research, by Company
  • Figure 2.10: Total Spending on a Single Launch Sequence, by Company
  • Figure 2.11: Allocation of Spending on a Single Launch Sequence: All Companies
  • Figure 2.12: Allocation of Spending on a Single Launch Sequence: Top 10 and Top 50 Companies
  • Figure 2.13: Allocation of Spending on a Single Launch Sequence: Small Companies

Developing and Maintaining Launch Sequences

  • Figure 2.14: Number of Working Hours to Develop Custom Launch Sequences: Top 10 and Top 50 Companies
  • Figure 2.15: Number of Working Hours to Develop Custom Launch Sequences: Small Companies
  • Figure 2.16: Number of Working Hours to Develop Custom Launch Sequences, by Portfolio Size
  • Figure 2.17: Frequency of Launch Sequencing Group Communication with Regulatory Teams: All Companies
  • Figure 2.18: Number of Meetings per Month with Regulatory Group About Launch Sequences: All Companies
  • Figure 2.19: Number of Meetings per Month with Regulatory Group About Launch Sequences, by Company Type
  • Figure 2.20: Number of Meetings per Month with Regulatory Group About Launch Sequences, by Group Region
  • Figure 2.21: Frequency of Launch Sequence Reassessments: All Companies
  • Figure 2.22: Frequency of Launch Sequence Reassessments, by Company Type
  • Figure 2.23: Frequency of Launch Sequence Reassessments, by Group Region

Trends and Practices for Global Launch Sequencing

  • Figure 3.1: Prototypical Launch Sequence for Pharmaceutical Products

Global Trends in Launch Sequencing

  • Figure 3.2: Cumulative Percentage of Companies Launching Products in US and Major Five EU Markets,* by Launch Wave
  • Figure 3.3: Division of Countries by Launch Wave: US and Major Developed Markets
  • Figure 3.4: Division of Countries by Launch Wave: Asian Markets
  • Figure 3.5: Division of Countries by Launch Wave: Latin American Markets
  • Figure 3.6: Year-Over-Year Trends in First Wave Launches: All Companies
  • Figure 3.7: Year-Over-Year Trends in Second Wave Launches: All Companies

Identifying Key Aspects of Individual Market Launches

  • Figure 3.8: Percentage of Companies per Launch Wave: US Launches
  • Figure 3.9: Percentage of Companies per Launch Wave: UK Launches
  • Figure 3.10: Percentage of Companies per Launch Wave: Germany Launches
  • Figure 3.11: Percentage of Companies per Launch Wave: France Launches
  • Figure 3.12: Percentage of Companies per Launch Wave: Spain Launches
  • Figure 3.13: Percentage of Companies per Launch Wave: Italy Launches
Back to Top