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市場調查報告書

中國單身客群行銷

Marketing to Singles - China - June 2015

出版商 Mintel China 商品編碼 335232
出版日期 內容資訊 英文
商品交期: 最快1-2個工作天內
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中國單身客群行銷 Marketing to Singles - China - June 2015
出版日期: 2015年06月30日 內容資訊: 英文
簡介

本報告針對中國單身客群行銷提供單身的快樂煩惱、對人生的期望、娛樂生活、飲食習慣、單身種類等、單身男女個別性格詳細分析、滿足單身者特有需求的行銷策略具有極大的市場機會與商業未來性。

第1章 序

  • 定義
  • 調查方法
  • 簡稱

第2章 摘要整理

  • 單身消費者生活方式概要
  • 幸福的單身者與不幸的單身者
  • 單身者對自身的自由和獨立性感覺驕傲
  • 比起單純的婚姻更渴望浪漫的幸福
  • 單身者討厭被他人強迫
  • 對單身男性的幫助與照顧
  • Mintel China的觀察

第3章 市場課題與重點

  • 單身者幸福嗎?
    • 市場數據
    • 對市場影響
  • 單身者渴望有伴侶嗎?
  • 「有壓力的單身男性」是行銷良機
  • 解讀「獨立單身女性」

第4章 趨勢應用

  • 單身的力量
  • 性別的不公平
  • 點擊 & 連結

第5章 中國單身消費者概要

  • 超過20歲單身者人數為2億3000萬人以上
  • 單身者人口持續擴大
  • 對單身消費者而言自由的感覺是幸福的泉源
  • 單身者對個人財務管理具有高度意識

第6章 人們為何享受單身?

  • 單身者可感覺自身的自由與獨立
  • 居住於層級一都市的25歲到39歲高所得女性更加享受單身
  • 女性比男性更認同單身
  • 超過25歲的單身者更能瞭解單身的優點
  • 所得越高越傾向享受單身生活

第7章 單身者最煩惱的事情是?

  • 比起尋找伴侶的困難單身者更煩惱來自他人的壓力
  • 大多數依然期待結婚對像
  • 煩惱未來是否可以平穩的生活
  • 層級一都市的高所得者有其他顧慮
  • 情緒面的支持與幫忙受到高所得者重視

第8章 單身者對人生的期待

  • 事業有成、幸福浪漫、與良好的財務狀況
  • 高所得單身者的最優先事項是旅行
  • 願望隨各年齡層改變
  • 90年代後出生的單身者(20∼24歲): 為了自己鍛鍊各種技術
  • 85年代後出生的單身者: 為了事業準備資金
  • 30歲以上單身者: 靠旅行遠離已熟悉的環境

第9章 單身者生活娛樂

  • 單身並不阻礙人們定期的戶外休閒活動
  • 單身者的娛樂常與朋友同行
  • 以獨立單身者為目標的行銷機會
  • 以富裕單身者為目標的劇場商機

第10章 單身者飲食習慣

  • 單身者比起非單身者更常不吃早餐
  • 單身者如何攝取三餐
  • 單身者也會自行下廚
  • 全套餐廳 vs. 速食
  • 外送 vs. 外帶

第11章 各種類的單身消費者

  • 三種單身消費者
  • 享受當下的單身者
  • 追求結婚的單身者
  • 喜歡待在家中的單身者
目錄

“Single people's happiness is largely dependent upon how well they are able to support their life financially to fulfil their needs and interests. While there is great business potential lying in satisfying the advanced needs of the ‘Live in the moment singles' and the rising ‘Independent females”, there also lies opportunities for brands to pay attention to the basic needs of the less wealthy and more stressed single people - males in particular.” - Laurel Gu, Senior Research Analyst.

This report covers the following areas:

  • Are single people happy or not?
  • Are singles eager to find a partner?
  • The “stressed single males” present marketing opportunities
  • Decoding the “independent single females”

Single consumers are different from non-singles mainly in a way that their living and leisure habits are heavily influenced by their parents or close friends. Therefore, products and services targeted at mainstream singles, may play around the notion of “friendship” (eg brotherhood, close girlfriends) and single people's attachment to their parents in marketing communications.

The majority of singles are feeling optimistic and happy about life. The freedom of having more personal time and space is the major source of their happiness, while single females in particular are eager to demonstrate their independence.

Brands showing understanding and appreciation of “single women's power” can effectively appeal to the rising single females and make them feel that it is “a brand for me”.

Despite the perceived various advantages, single people do have worries and concerns. Uncertainty about life in the future is the main thing. There is an opportunity for financial companies to offer products designed for single people (eg life insurance products) to give them more reassurances in their later life.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction

  • Definition
  • Methodology
  • Abbreviations

2. Executive Summary

  • Overview of single consumers and their lifestyles
    • Figure 1: Population of single people (unmarried, widowed and divorced) aged 20 and over, China 2004-13
  • The happy and non-happy singles
    • Figure 2: Consumers segmentation based on their attitude towards life, March 2015
    • Figure 3: Consumer attitudes towards single life - % of “agree strongly” or “agree somewhat”, by psychographic group, March 2015
  • Single people find their pride in freedom and independence
    • Figure 4: Perceived advantages of being single, March 2015
  • A happy romance is more desirable than simply getting married
    • Figure 5: Most desired achievements, March 2015
  • However, the singles hate to be pushed by others
    • Figure 6: Annoyances of being single, March 2015
  • More helping hands and caring for single males
  • What we think

3. Issues and Insights

  • Are single people happy or not?
  • The facts
  • The implications
  • Are singles eager to find a partner?
  • The facts
  • The implications
  • The “stressed single males” present marketing opportunities
  • The facts
  • The implications
    • Figure 7: Etude House's hand cream packaging featuring mood lifting mood lifting messages, South Korea, 2013
  • Decoding the “independent single females”
  • The facts
  • The implications

4. Trend Application

  • The Power of One
    • Figure 8: Example of convenient stores (FamilyMart) offering entertainment devices on its in-store dining table, Shanghai, 2015
  • The Unfair Sex
  • Click and Connect

5. Overview of Single Consumers in China

  • Key points
  • Over 230 million singles over 20
    • Figure 9: Marital status among people aged over 20, China, 2013
  • Single population is continuously expanding
    • Figure 10: Percentage of single people amongst total population over 20, China, 2013
  • Sense of freedom is the source of happiness for single consumers
    • Figure 11: Selected attitudes towards life, by relationship status, March 2015
  • Singles are as conscious in personal finance management
    • Figure 12: Selected attitudes towards spending and future plans, by relationship status, March 2015

6. Why Do People Enjoy Being Single?

  • Key points
  • Single people see themselves being free and independent
    • Figure 13: Perceived advantages of being single, March 2015
  • Females, aged 25-39, high earners and those living in tier one cities are more likely to enjoy being single
    • Figure 14: Average number of perceived advantages of being single, by demographics, March 2015
  • Females hold a more positive attitude towards being single than males do
    • Figure 15: Perceived advantages of being single, by gender, March 2015
    • Figure 16: Example of Baileys' marketing communications on its Irish cream liqueur, China, 2015
    • Figure 17: Example of Baileys' marketing communications on its Irish cream liqueur, China, 2015
  • The over 25s see more benefits from being single
    • Figure 18: Perceived advantages of being single, by age, March 2015
  • The more you earn, the more you enjoy singlehood
    • Figure 19: Perceived advantages of being single, by monthly personal income, March 2015

7. What Annoys Single People the Most?

  • Key points
  • Pressure from others annoys them more than the difficulty in finding a partner
    • Figure 20: Annoyances of being single, March 2015
    • Figure 21: Consumers who are concerned about the pressure from friends/family to find a partner/get married, by demographics, March 2015
  • The majority still look forward to finding a partner
    • Figure 22: Consumers who are concerned about the difficulty in finding a partner as they get older, by demographics, March 2015
  • Security of life in the future still exists
    • Figure 23: Consumers who are concerned “may miss the best childbearing age as getting older”, by age, March 2015
  • High earners in tier one cities have other concerns
    • Figure 24: Average number of concerns about being single chosen, by demographics, March 2015
  • Emotional support and a helping hand can appeal to high earners
    • Figure 25: Selected annoyances of being single, by income, March 2015

8. Single People's Aspirations in Life

  • Key points
  • Career achievements, a happy romance and better financial situation are most desired
    • Figure 26: Most desired achievements, March 2015
  • Travelling is also on top of the mind of the high earning singles
    • Figure 27: Consumers who chose “to travel to more unknown places” amongst the top three desired achievements, by demographics, March 2015
  • Aspirations vary by generations:
    • Figure 28: Most desired achievements, by age, March 2015
  • The post-90s singles (aged 20-24): develop skills to better themselves
    • Figure 29: Examples of brands' marketing communications interpreting future aspirations of the post 90s generation, China, 2015
  • The post-85s singles: hold on to career and get financially prepared
    • Figure 30: Examples of brands' marketing communications interpreting future aspirations of the singles aged 25-29, China, 2015
  • Singles who are above 30: travel to escape the world they know
    • Figure 31: Examples of brands' marketing communications interpreting future aspirations of the singles aged above 30, China, 2015

9. Single People's Leisure Life

  • Key points
  • Being single does not bar people from regular out-of-home leisure activities
    • Figure 32: Leisure activities done in the past six months, by relationship status, March 2015
  • Single people tend to be bounded with their friends during leisure hours
    • Figure 33: Who to go with in leisure activities, by relationship status, March 2015
    • Figure 34: Percentage of consumers who have done these leisure activities with their friends in the past six months, by gender, March 2015
  • Opportunities for targeting the independent singles
    • Figure 35: Percentage of consumers who have done these leisure activities alone in the past six months, by gender, March 2015
  • The show business to target wealthy singles
    • Figure 36: Consumers who have watched live shows / events (eg football games, concerts) in the past six months, by age and income, March 2015

10. Single People's Dining Habits

  • Key points
  • Singles are more likely to skip breakfast than non-singles
    • Figure 37: Meal habits, March 2015
    • Figure 38: Single consumers who are used to skipping breakfast, by demographics, March 2015
  • How singles have their three meals
  • Singles do cook for themselves
    • Figure 39: Ways of having three meals, March 2015
  • Full service restaurants versus fast food restaurants
  • Food delivery versus buying takeaway

11. Different Types of Single Consumers

  • Key points
  • Three types of single consumers
    • Figure 40: Consumers segmentation based on their attitude towards life, March 2015
    • Figure 41: Consumer attitudes towards life (% of “agree strongly” or “agree somewhat”), by psychographic group, March 2015
  • Live in the moment singles
    • Figure 42: Demographic features of “Live in the moment singles”, by psychographic group, March 2015
    • Figure 43: Advantages of being single, by psychographic groups, March 2015
  • Marriage seekers
    • Figure 44: Demographic features of “Marriage seekers”, by psychographic group, March 2015
    • Figure 45: Ways of doing leisure activities - percentage of consumers who have done the activities with friends over the past six months, by psychographic groups, March 2015
  • Homebodies
    • Figure 46: Selected leisure activities done in the past six months, by psychographic groups, March 2015
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